Sleep training

Message Bookmarked
Bookmark Removed

Baby is about 6.25 months. Right now, she sleeps in bed with my wife and I. The good thing is, she sleeps through the night, every night, waking up only a little bit to nurse. The bad thing is, she never ever sleeps unless she is in bed with my wife or on top of my wife on the couch. She has slept on me like once, and she never sleeps on her own. This means she doesn't really nap very much, maybe an hour/hour and a half per day at most, if my wife has time to sit on the couch and let her nap on top of her.

So we're talking about sleep training. The main reasons we want her to sleep in the crib or cosleeper are related to convenience for us: it would be nice if we could put her down for a nap on her own for an couple of hours each day while we get other things done, and my wife would like to be able to stretch out while she sleeps. But I'm also not sure if the baby isn't getting enough sleep, since we don't go to bed until about 10 (though the baby usually falls asleep around 9) and she doesn't really nap. She seems pretty energetic, but the baby books talk about babies going to bed at like 6:30 or 7 and napping 2-3 hours during the day.

So: should we try to sleep train or just be happy that the baby sleeps through the night? Any good sleep training tips or methods or books to recommend?

congratulations (n/a), Wednesday, 2 February 2011 02:55 (six years ago) Permalink

We're thinking about starting out by trying to sleep in the cosleeper for at least part of the night, since she'll still be able to see us and go to bed at the same time as us but hopefully get used to sleeping on her own. But maybe it's better to just go full-out and try to get her in the crib first?

congratulations (n/a), Wednesday, 2 February 2011 02:56 (six years ago) Permalink

"She seems pretty energetic, but the baby books talk about babies going to bed at like 6:30 or 7 and napping 2-3 hours during the day."

So I don't have any advice for your particular situation (as my baby is 1) younger than yours and 2) doesn't have many sleep issues at this point) but I can say that you shouldn't worry about what baby books say is the norm. If you daughter wasn't getting enough sleep you'd probably know by this point since she'd be flipping out left and right from exhaustion and you'd have torn half your hair out.

Fig On A Plate Cart (Alex in SF), Wednesday, 2 February 2011 03:33 (six years ago) Permalink

yeah probably. still would be nice to sleep train for our convenience.

last night we tried waiting until she fell asleep in bed with us then transferring her to the cosleeper, which had been warming up with a heating pad. didn't work, she basically woke up and started crying right away.

congratulations (n/a), Wednesday, 2 February 2011 14:53 (six years ago) Permalink

Actually I do have one other suggestion (gleaned from conversations from other parents at group). Assuming you have a normal routine (i.e. M-F 9-5, etc) try to make any routine changes happen on Friday evenings, that way you can make a couple of attempts (put baby down in new way, fuss, sooth, try again, etc) on a couple of nights where you can both sleep late the next day if things don't work out immediately.

Fig On A Plate Cart (Alex in SF), Wednesday, 2 February 2011 15:17 (six years ago) Permalink

going to try to put this into effect starting on Friday. kinda worried. we decided to just go all-out and try to get her to nap in the crib and sleep in at night at the same time, figured it would send fewer mixed messages. she is not going to be happy about it though.

congratulations (n/a), Tuesday, 15 February 2011 22:22 (six years ago) Permalink

well this sucks

congratulations (n/a), Saturday, 19 February 2011 02:42 (six years ago) Permalink

my wife and i did the cry it out method, cole took to that in 3 days. Of course he has been a fantastic sleeper since the day he was born.

OLD MAN YELLS AT SHOUT RAP (chrisv2010), Wednesday, 2 March 2011 21:32 (six years ago) Permalink

how's it goin n/a?

progressive cuts (Tracer Hand), Thursday, 3 March 2011 01:24 (six years ago) Permalink

ugh. i think i posted about it on another thread but we're essentially taking a break from it for now, at least for a short while. the first weekend we tried a couple of variations on no-cry solutions. it turns out they are bullshit, they pretty much all rely on some amount of crying. then we got into an issue about the noise with our upstairs neighbors that kind of put things on hold. we got that settled down, with the understanding that we'd try to keep the noise down if possible. so then we came up with a new method where first we'd try to get her used to sleeping in the cosleeper next to us, thinking maybe if she could see us and be in the bedroom with us, it might be easier. the idea was then once she was used to that, we'd move the cosleeper further from the bed, then into the next room, etc. however, my wife has trouble waking up enough to move the baby into the cosleeper continuously through the night (understandably). and now the baby is teething pretty badly, so we decided to wait until the worst of that blows over before we get back into serious sleep training. we need to figure it out. i wish we could just do a cry-it-out method but we really can't with these neighbors. we even talked about my wife taking the baby to her mom's house for a week to try and get started on real sleep training (ie crying it out).

congratulations (n/a), Thursday, 3 March 2011 02:51 (six years ago) Permalink

are you sure you want to do cry it out? read all the pro/anti articles?

Vicky, Thursday, 3 March 2011 11:29 (six years ago) Permalink

im all for the crying it out. we also bought these rockabye baby cd's which i put on my ipod and played for him which seemed to help.

and this thing called the sleep sheep.

OLD MAN YELLS AT SHOUT RAP (chrisv2010), Thursday, 3 March 2011 15:52 (six years ago) Permalink

and nick the idea of sarah taking her to her mothers seems like a viable option.

OLD MAN YELLS AT SHOUT RAP (chrisv2010), Thursday, 3 March 2011 15:52 (six years ago) Permalink

ha, we have the sleep sheep. it's not that i really want her to cry it out, i'm just not sure what else is going to work. she's so dependent on being next to my wife and nursing to be able to sleep. she literally does not sleep at all unless she is right next to my wife. and like i said, the "no-cry" solutions we looked at still involved crying, you just let the baby cry for a certain amount of time (some of them have you wait like 5 minutes, others have you pick her up as soon as she starts crying) before you comfort her. so there's going to be crying no matter what.

congratulations (n/a), Thursday, 3 March 2011 15:56 (six years ago) Permalink

thats what we did, first night 5 minutes, second night 10, etc...30 max. by night three he was out instantly.

OLD MAN YELLS AT SHOUT RAP (chrisv2010), Thursday, 3 March 2011 16:18 (six years ago) Permalink

also that is one reason why my wife and i refused to let him sleep in the bed with us since day one...cole was in his crib within a week and sleeping on his stomach. YEAH WE ARE HORRIBLE! Haha.

OLD MAN YELLS AT SHOUT RAP (chrisv2010), Thursday, 3 March 2011 16:19 (six years ago) Permalink

on his stomach?? i'm calling the police.

progressive cuts (Tracer Hand), Thursday, 3 March 2011 16:26 (six years ago) Permalink

exactly. he was completely miserable on his back.

OLD MAN YELLS AT SHOUT RAP (chrisv2010), Thursday, 3 March 2011 16:30 (six years ago) Permalink

definitely wait until the teething has passed to try anything fwiw

but yeah there's gonna be some crying. you just have to suck it up. yr neighbors have to be told to fuck off, basically.

ridiculous, uncalled for slap (Shakey Mo Collier), Thursday, 3 March 2011 19:33 (six years ago) Permalink

There is going to be crying, it's how much there is that makes the difference. Whether you agree with recent studies about the effects of prolonged crying on a baby's brain (and I don't mean 30 minutes crying, proper crying it out is shutting the door and leaving them no matter what). I agree that the neighbours need to mind their own and buy ear plugs if they're really having such a hard time with it.

Vicky, Friday, 4 March 2011 09:29 (six years ago) Permalink

"Whether you agree with recent studies about the effects of prolonged crying on a baby's brain"

It's nonsense. No one knows anything and they certainly can't isolate that three/four nights of even the most severe cry-it-out sleep training has had any long term effect on anyone. Probably all of our parents were sleep trained that way and sure they're all psychos but they aren't any whackier than the next gen of Ferberized or gentle sleep folks.

Fig On A Plate Cart (Alex in SF), Saturday, 5 March 2011 18:32 (six years ago) Permalink

Should clarify I mean that it's nonsense as it applies to sleep training or scheduling or whatever. Obviously neglecting a screaming child for hours, days on end appears to be pretty harmful.

Fig On A Plate Cart (Alex in SF), Saturday, 5 March 2011 21:34 (six years ago) Permalink

Like I said, do your reading up and reach your own conclusions (unless you're a scientist yourself!) IMO there's no right or wrong way to do it (Though obviously some things are beyond the pale) Personally I can't stand the 'it didn't do us/them/me any harm way of thinking about it without doing research, and for me personally my problem with crying it out isn't just about chemicals in the brain, I don't want to leave my baby to cry for a couple of evenings so that they get to the point where they stop crying because they know no-one's going to come to them.

As I said, other parents read the research and reach different opinions to mine? That's just fine.

n/a, did you decide what to do, did you have another crack at it this weekend?

Vicky, Monday, 7 March 2011 08:55 (six years ago) Permalink

no. i think my wife is going to take her to her mom's house next week. btw she checked out the newest edition of Ferber's book, and the whole intro is about how he thinks he has a bad rep as the "cry it out" guy, and what he really believes in is "controlled crying," which doesn't really sound that different from the no-cry methods we read about. also he says he regrets not writing more about co-sleeping in the past.

congratulations (n/a), Monday, 7 March 2011 13:58 (six years ago) Permalink

she'll come home all set.

OLD MAN YELLS AT SHOUT RAP (chrisv2010), Monday, 7 March 2011 15:13 (six years ago) Permalink

Fingers crossed here that she will.

I agree that Ferber was portrayed as the bad guy, from what I've read he definitely doesn't recommend the traditional cry it out method, I feel quite sorry for him really.

Did you read any co-sleeping books beforehand? I didn't really co-sleep with A, he slept in the moses basket next to the bed though he did often end up staying in the bed with us. I'm thinking that it would probably be safer to do it properly this time and need to find a good book or two to read...

Vicky, Monday, 7 March 2011 15:24 (six years ago) Permalink

"I don't want to leave my baby to cry for a couple of evenings so that they get to the point where they stop crying because they know no-one's going to come to them."

I'm more into my baby learning to sooth themselves to sleep so my wife and I aren't waking up every two hours to reassure him. Feel like both of us are better parents when we aren't exhausted.

"As I said, other parents read the research and reach different opinions to mine?"

What research exactly are you talking about? I've read a bit on this and I don't believe there are any studies which indicate that controlled crying/CIO sleep-training/sleep-scheduling cause "brain damage" or whatever nonsense baby fear mongers are been pedaling this week (look closely at any of the research papers cited for example by Dr Sears and you'll find every one of them basically address either a) babies who experience severe trauma and neglect or b) babies who are already on the extreme end of fussy/crying). The only study I've heard actually on this subject at all is one done in Australia recently which basically concluded that controlled crying results in better rested infants and saner parents.

Fig On A Plate Cart (Alex in SF), Monday, 7 March 2011 15:35 (six years ago) Permalink

Right, crying it out is not the same as controlled crying and all the other methods out there. Crying it out is closing the door on your LO and leaving them to it. I've done sleep training, A has cried, just not with me shutting the door and leaving him to it. Thought I'd made enough of a distinction, but obviously not.

And as for the role cortisone can play on a baby's brain

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2010/apr/21/leaving-baby-to-cry-brain-development-damage And there's a section in 'The science of parenting' book that I can't find much of a reference to online http://www.amazon.co.uk/Science-Parenting-Jaak-Panksepp/dp/0756618800

Have to go and pick A up now otherwise I'd see what else I could point to.

I really don't think we feel all that differently, just a misunderstanding over terminology...

Vicky, Monday, 7 March 2011 16:18 (six years ago) Permalink

Penelope Leach doesn't cite one study which claims controlled crying or CIO causes brain damage (because these studies do not exist). That Sunderland book is similar nonsense, I imagine, although I confess I haven't read it. I have read <a href=http://www.askdrsears.com/html/10/handout2.asp>;this</a> which gets cited quite a bit with Sunderland and it's a <a href=http://mainstreamparenting.com/2008/06/25/of-sources-and-straw-houses-the-annotated-dr-sears-handout-on-cio/>;joke</a>.

The question is not whether or not cortisol plays a part in brain development. It's whether or not the limited crying present in cry-it-out causes deleterious effects on infant brain development. And again every study indicates that it does not.

Fig On A Plate Cart (Alex in SF), Monday, 7 March 2011 16:45 (six years ago) Permalink

Penelope Leach doesn't cite one study which claims controlled crying or CIO causes brain damage (because these studies do not exist)

Oh, I must have missed the bit where I said they did. Silly me. Except I have never said that CIO causes brain damage.

Alex, do you actually believe that CIO is an acceptable method of sleep control, as opposed to controlled crying, or are you just arguing for arguing's sake?

Vicky, Monday, 7 March 2011 21:41 (six years ago) Permalink

"Except I have never said that CIO causes brain damage."

Hey you cited her article, not me. It sez it right in the url. Also you alluded to "recent studies about the effects of prolonged crying on a baby's brain", I assumed you were talking about her "recent studies".

I think people should do what they find works for them. But no I don't think even full blown night/nap time CIO is "unacceptable" in principle.

Fig On A Plate Cart (Alex in SF), Monday, 7 March 2011 22:03 (six years ago) Permalink

honestly the idea of "let them cry until they stop" seems like it could be - depending on the situation - i.e. if they're colicky or whatever that could be... two hours? - horrendously disturbing for the parents, regardless of whatever's going on with the baby. my own breaking point is probably 15 minutes at the outside.

40% chill and 100% negative (Tracer Hand), Monday, 7 March 2011 23:28 (six years ago) Permalink

listening to yr kid cry while you do nothing = the feeling that time has stopped

even so, it must be done, at least to some extent, if they are ever gonna learn to sleep without you

You hurt me deeply. You hurt me deeply in my heart. (Shakey Mo Collier), Monday, 7 March 2011 23:36 (six years ago) Permalink

i definitely feel bad about letting her cry for any extended period of time. i feel like if i was going to do a real cry it out method, it would have had to have been when she was really little. but now that she's 7+ months and understands connections a little more, i think just leaving her in her crib in the dark with no response and no phase-in would make her think either that something was wrong or that she was in trouble, making it less likely that she would fall asleep. i think my wife is going to do one of the graduated methods where you let them cry a little longer each night before responding and soothing.

congratulations (n/a), Monday, 7 March 2011 23:39 (six years ago) Permalink

^^^that was mostly what we did but even then you still have to sit through like 10 straight minutes of crying. and then 15 straight minutes of crying. and then 20 straight minutes of crying. etc. then eventually it stops and they only cry a little bit before putting themselves to sleep each night.

You hurt me deeply. You hurt me deeply in my heart. (Shakey Mo Collier), Tuesday, 8 March 2011 00:05 (six years ago) Permalink

and then eventually they don't cry at all.

You hurt me deeply. You hurt me deeply in my heart. (Shakey Mo Collier), Tuesday, 8 March 2011 00:05 (six years ago) Permalink

nick, cole was around 7-8 months when we started the cry it out with him.

OLD MAN YELLS AT SHOUT RAP (chrisv2010), Tuesday, 8 March 2011 14:37 (six years ago) Permalink

Hi.

We're going to get a pack n play for the sleep training, take it home afterwards and set it up in the nursery, and then switch her to the crib a little while later. Fingers crossed!

Vicky, I did do quite a bit of reading about cosleeping before we had the baby. I was really into attachment parenting a la Sears/Motherhood Magazine and still mostly am, but something had to give. As it is, I can't ever leave the house in the evening. No one, not even Nick, can get her to sleep. There are lots of other reasons, but anyway, yeah, I'm kind of shocked by how much I'm feeling Ferber.

KitCat, Tuesday, 8 March 2011 19:19 (six years ago) Permalink

thats how it started with cole, and we didn't do co-sleeping. we rocked him to sleep for 7 months, then my wife went out for the night and i rocked him for 4 hours straight and he would not sleep. I got in the car with him and drove around for an hour and he passed out. The next night, we started the cry it out/ferber.

OLD MAN YELLS AT SHOUT RAP (chrisv2010), Tuesday, 8 March 2011 20:08 (six years ago) Permalink

"when my wife went out for the night and i rocked him for 4 hours straight and he would not sleep"

Ouch. I'm joke around that Dalton can't stand my touch because when I lay him down to sleep he's out in minutes whereas he tortures my wife for like half an hour plus sometimes.

Fig On A Plate Cart (Alex in SF), Tuesday, 8 March 2011 20:40 (six years ago) Permalink

he'd fall asleep for two minutes, wake up, cry, fall asleep, wake up cry. I put him in and out of the crib like 15 times. I was ready to pull my hair out.

OLD MAN YELLS AT SHOUT RAP (chrisv2010), Tuesday, 8 March 2011 20:43 (six years ago) Permalink

KitCat, I'm with you on something having to give! I always fed A to sleep but it was the two hourly waking that drove me insane, to the point where I'd be walking through a park and just burst into tears I was so tired. So yeah, night 'weaning' was started when he was around 7 months old. I didn't totally night wean him, but definitely tried to ensure that he wasn't just wanting a snack out of habit! I hate how people assume that attachment parenting is rigid and can't involve any sleep training at all, it's crap. It's just how you do it.

In fact I hate the labelling that happens. You decide what works for you, some will be one style, others will be something different. Does it matter so long as you and baby are happy? I hadn't heard of attachment parenting until A was over 12 months old. It sounds as though it's quite similar to how I like to parent, but some of it is very different indeed.

Vicky, Wednesday, 9 March 2011 15:30 (six years ago) Permalink

I feel like the biggest issue I have with attachment parenting is that the many its biggest proponents (both in print and even more noticeably on parenting message boards--not a dig at anyone here seriously) strike me as completely crazy/inflexible/judgmental (not that mainstream parents on message boards are anything to write home about either--although I can understand their knee-jerk defensiveness a little better). Which is too bad because most of AP I find personally really compelling (it largely was how my mother parented me and how my wife and I are parenting out son).

Fig On A Plate Cart (Alex in SF), Wednesday, 9 March 2011 16:26 (six years ago) Permalink

parents can be self-righteous about just about anything

congratulations (n/a), Wednesday, 9 March 2011 16:33 (six years ago) Permalink

lol too true!

Fig On A Plate Cart (Alex in SF), Wednesday, 9 March 2011 16:46 (six years ago) Permalink

two weeks pass...

How did this end up going (we are rapidly approaching to the "okay you're in your room for the night and we'll see you in the morning" point ourselves)?

Fig On A Plate Cart (Alex in SF), Thursday, 24 March 2011 14:37 (six years ago) Permalink

it seems to have worked well. it was very successful while my wife and baby were at my mother-in-law's. since they've been back, we've had a couple of nights where she fell asleep very quickly and slept through most of the night without much fussing, and a couple of nights where she was a little fussier off and on (but still slept on her own). we're still figuring some things out, like what conditions are necessary, how quiet we have to be once she falls asleep, and the timing. right now we're tiptoing around the apartment and whispering once she falls asleep, which is kind of annoying. the main problems we're having now are 1) she's been waking up really early most mornings, like around 5 a.m., which is only about 9 hours of sleep, and 2) she won't nap in the cosleeper at all, no matter how tired she gets. for 1) we're trying to figure out if 9 hours is just the max she'll sleep or if other things are waking her up and she'll sleep longer once take care of them. for 2), I guess we'll need to get some blackout curtains for the nursery and then just work harder on training her to nap in the pack and play.

congratulations (n/a), Thursday, 24 March 2011 14:45 (six years ago) Permalink

fyi we ended up using the Ferber method, though as I noted above, it's not really that different from the no-cry methods. basically he gives you a table of times where each night you let them cry a little longer before going in and soothing them, but I think even at the longest, you're only letting them cry for 20 minutes.

congratulations (n/a), Thursday, 24 March 2011 14:46 (six years ago) Permalink

Yeah I've read a fair portion of the Ferber and Weissbluth books now. We're probably starting with Ferber (when I see we, I mean me, my wife despite being even more exhausted than I am has an absolutely visceral reaction to hearing the baby cry so she's sleeping upstairs for the nights while I am doing this) for at least the recommended 7-9 days. I'm not looking forward to it, but it beats where I'm at and so far our various "no-cry" interventions appear to simply be making him cry more.

Fig On A Plate Cart (Alex in SF), Thursday, 24 March 2011 14:56 (six years ago) Permalink

thats what we did nick...well done.

Get me two meatball sandwiches Utah, TWO! (chrisv2010), Thursday, 24 March 2011 16:34 (six years ago) Permalink

in my experience, you'll ultimately have to do some kind of "cry it out" method, unfortunately. there are gentler variations, like the ferber method - they take longer and are more of a pain, but they are gentler. i think you'll find that it will suck really bad for a night or two, but you'll start seeing positive changes pretty quickly.

congratulations (n/a), Thursday, 12 September 2013 16:33 (three years ago) Permalink

Marcos, nip it in the bud. Do Ferber. It's not even really healthy for your baby to be waking up every 1-2 hours at 12 months, and it's probably making it harder for you to be good parents too.

#fomo that's the motto (Hurting 2), Thursday, 12 September 2013 16:58 (three years ago) Permalink

And you have to make some rules for yourselves about the "exceptions" cuz right now it sounds like you have exceptions for everything (teething, growth spurt, bad day, etc.). I've been there buddy, but it ain't good. Sleep training is partly also about training yourselves, imo.

#fomo that's the motto (Hurting 2), Thursday, 12 September 2013 16:59 (three years ago) Permalink

And especially if he is waking up to nurse, that means his stomach is accustomed to eating every 1-2 hours. I don't think it's going to get unaccustomed to that unless you change something, or at least it will take a very very long time to happen on its own.

#fomo that's the motto (Hurting 2), Thursday, 12 September 2013 17:01 (three years ago) Permalink

agree that some version of "cry it out" has to happen. in my experience. we aren't quite all the way there yet with our lil guy (8 mos) who is still waking up at least once a night to nurse, and if he wakes up a 2nd time I put him back to sleep myself (no bottle etc.) So he'll sleep, but he needs to be held/rocked to sleep, and it will be letting go of that that I expect will involve a few nights of serious crying

what's up ugly girls? (Shakey Mo Collier), Thursday, 12 September 2013 17:13 (three years ago) Permalink

I sometimes think human babies are probably best adapted to sleeping with their moms on a mat on the floor, and not sleeping alone in their cribs, and that's probably why we do indeed need to "train" them to sleep through the night in a crib. I'm not really a big believer in the primacy of supposedly "natural" human habits though, and I think we're pretty adaptable to a wide variety of modes of living. If you can handle co-sleeping, more power to you, but we couldn't. And if you're not going to co-sleep, it seems like some kind of crying method is required.

#fomo that's the motto (Hurting 2), Thursday, 12 September 2013 17:17 (three years ago) Permalink

And especially if he is waking up to nurse, that means his stomach is accustomed to eating every 1-2 hours. I don't think it's going to get unaccustomed to that unless you change something, or at least it will take a very very long time to happen on its own.

yea based on the good nights we've had, (which only happen probably 25% of the time) there's some hope that he'd 'naturally outgrow' the need for night nursing. but i'm not confident anymore that that would happen anytime soon. night-weaning in some form has to be a serious part of this.

we don't co-sleep, which i'm grateful for. i feel like that would be an entirely different problem we'd then need to deal with -- how to get him out of our room as he grows older. at the beginning i think we liked the idea on principle but it just didn't work for any of us. not even really for J, b/c he couldn't handle us shifting positions or really moving at all. and we couldn't handle his moving, either.

marcos, Thursday, 12 September 2013 17:51 (three years ago) Permalink

also i have horror stories from my brother and his wife, who co-slept and had to "forcibly evict" their 3 year-old who still wanted to nurse throughout the night. that freaked us out enough to move j to a crib eventually in his own room around 6 months

marcos, Thursday, 12 September 2013 17:53 (three years ago) Permalink

how often does j nap? bee was a terrible sleeper until her naps were cut out. now shes often asleep in 5 minutes and for all of the night mostly. im guessing at 12 months there are probably multiple naps. can you cut out the last one?

"Max's Original Starship" Vol. 3 (sunny successor), Thursday, 12 September 2013 19:00 (three years ago) Permalink

IANAP(yet) but I was reading about sleep regression after aero's post either here or in another parenting thread and could that be part of the problem? I don't know what impact that would have on your approach but if it seems to fit, it might at least give you some hope for it being temporary.

I very very vividly remember being a small child and 1) not being able to go to sleep unless a parent was in the room with me and 2) getting up and getting in bed with my parents at every available opportunity (I even remember climbing out of my crib). It was 100% about being scared/anxious about something and there was such palpable relief at being nestled next to a parent. It was like toddler Xanax.

carl agatha, Thursday, 12 September 2013 20:37 (three years ago) Permalink

I was a generally a very worried little kid, though. I hope this child doesn't inherit that tendency, the poor thing.

carl agatha, Thursday, 12 September 2013 20:41 (three years ago) Permalink

fwiw, we've never enforced a policy of complete dead time all night or anything. We sleep in the same room for now, and we still often go to her if she calls out (which is rarely more than once a night), and if she gets completely hysterical then we absolutely go to her, but we do have a "no picking up" rule unless she's sick or something. We also found that picking her up never seemed to calm her down anyway, in fact she'd get more agitated as she came more out of sleep. But you have to learn your own child, they're all slightly different.

#fomo that's the motto (Hurting 2), Thursday, 12 September 2013 20:46 (three years ago) Permalink

how often does j nap? bee was a terrible sleeper until her naps were cut out. now shes often asleep in 5 minutes and for all of the night mostly. im guessing at 12 months there are probably multiple naps. can you cut out the last one?

― "Max's Original Starship" Vol. 3 (sunny successor), Thursday, September 12, 2013 3:00 PM Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

Wait, you went no naps at all? We did start a no naps after x hour policy at one point (now it's not an issue because she's down to one nap a day) because we found that if she woke up after 4 or so she couldn't fall asleep at night.

#fomo that's the motto (Hurting 2), Thursday, 12 September 2013 20:48 (three years ago) Permalink

also i have horror stories from my brother and his wife, who co-slept and had to "forcibly evict" their 3 year-old who still wanted to nurse throughout the night. that freaked us out enough to move j to a crib eventually in his own room around 6 months

― marcos, Thursday, September 12, 2013 1:53 PM (2 hours ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

I mean, we co-sleep and don't really have this problem. Maybe because we didn't really breastfeed, but my girl's almost 3 and sleeping with her doesn't bother us a bit. Our boy slept in the same room with us consistently until he was like 7 before we started to ween him off. I mean, as with all aspects of parenting, different people and kids are gonna have different results.

how's life, Thursday, 12 September 2013 20:49 (three years ago) Permalink

xp: if my girl falls asleep ever during the day, she's up until at least midnight. we've had an official no naps policy for almost a year now.

how's life, Thursday, 12 September 2013 20:50 (three years ago) Permalink

When are kids supposed to stop napping? Fuck.

how's life, Thursday, 12 September 2013 20:51 (three years ago) Permalink

Seeing the crazy sleep habits of the kids (and parents!) of some co-sleeping families we knew was definitely a factor in our decision not to do it, but it's so anecdotal, and I know a lot of people make it work. Anyway we were also terrified of crushing her and the few times we tried having her in the bed we couldn't fall asleep. We've occasionally had her in the bed on the road now and it's much easier because she's huge and not easily crushable.

#fomo that's the motto (Hurting 2), Thursday, 12 September 2013 20:52 (three years ago) Permalink

K does seem to like sleeping in the bed with us, or with mom anyway, she seems kind of indifferent to sleeping in the bed with me.

#fomo that's the motto (Hurting 2), Thursday, 12 September 2013 20:52 (three years ago) Permalink

evie seems to be in a transitional phase re: naps where if she takes a nap, it's a pain in the ass to get her down at night, but if she doesn't, she's loopy and passing out at 6:30. i assume she still takes a nap at school but i'm not sure.

congratulations (n/a), Thursday, 12 September 2013 20:54 (three years ago) Permalink

Our worst phase was when she was getting tired around 3 or 4 o'clock, which was right when my wife would have to take her on a long car-ride to meet me as I was getting off work/she was heading to work.

how's life, Thursday, 12 September 2013 21:00 (three years ago) Permalink

Yeah I pretty much can't tolerate K by the late afternoon if she doesn't take a nap, sorry K.

#fomo that's the motto (Hurting 2), Thursday, 12 September 2013 21:02 (three years ago) Permalink

IANAP(yet) but I was reading about sleep regression after aero's post either here or in another parenting thread and could that be part of the problem? I don't know what impact that would have on your approach but if it seems to fit, it might at least give you some hope for it being temporary.

I very very vividly remember being a small child and 1) not being able to go to sleep unless a parent was in the room with me and 2) getting up and getting in bed with my parents at every available opportunity (I even remember climbing out of my crib). It was 100% about being scared/anxious about something and there was such palpable relief at being nestled next to a parent. It was like toddler Xanax.

― carl agatha, Thursday, September 12, 2013 3:37 PM (43 minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

i think the fear of throwing abandonment on top of the anxiety stopped us from doing any kind of cry it out. both of our kids are nighttime worriers and frequent nightmare havers. Just last night bee appeared saying she had had a nightmare that she was at her grandfathers house but the house included a room from our house (our ex-office/spare room filled with crap). Her father was standing at the door to this room yelling RUN! RUN! RUN! This morning she woke up very fretful her grandparents would not show up for grandparents day lunch at her school. Poor kid. So much fretting over nothing.

"Max's Original Starship" Vol. 3 (sunny successor), Thursday, 12 September 2013 21:28 (three years ago) Permalink

<3 poor thing!

carl agatha, Thursday, 12 September 2013 21:34 (three years ago) Permalink

i mean the cry it out may well have worked fine but really i dont have the stomach for it. My parents were very anti-co-sleep and i was a very very fretful kid who had multiple nightmares per night. it wasn't an option to wake them up so i ended up pretty alone and fearful all the time getting 0-3 hours sleep a night. i cant risk even the slightest chance of that.

"Max's Original Starship" Vol. 3 (sunny successor), Thursday, 12 September 2013 21:36 (three years ago) Permalink

Yeah, I have memories of some dark, dark nights of the soul at age 4 or so.

how's life, Thursday, 12 September 2013 21:39 (three years ago) Permalink

Also, specific memories of two things that were on my parents TV when I went downstairs to tell them I missed them. One was a blonde woman in a white bikini. The other was an explosion!

how's life, Thursday, 12 September 2013 21:41 (three years ago) Permalink

I had a sleep with the light on phase around ages 4-5, but it subsided. K is relatively well adjusted and non-anxious so far, but I'm a little worried at what's going to happen when we move in a couple of months and she gets her own room.

#fomo that's the motto (Hurting 2), Thursday, 12 September 2013 21:46 (three years ago) Permalink

Marcos, nip it in the bud. Do Ferber.

^^^^^

lifesaver imo.

combination hair (underrated aerosmith bootlegs I have owned), Thursday, 12 September 2013 21:46 (three years ago) Permalink

I didn't see any immediate bad results from the sleep training we did though, and in fact once she hit about 14-15 months she started actually asking to go to sleep when she was tired, like she actually gets annoyed if we prolong putting her in the crib too much.

#fomo that's the motto (Hurting 2), Thursday, 12 September 2013 21:47 (three years ago) Permalink

Obvs can never really know if there was some deeper trauma from it though.

#fomo that's the motto (Hurting 2), Thursday, 12 September 2013 21:47 (three years ago) Permalink

that's one of the joys of parenting, never knowing if something you're doing is causing lifelong trauma until it's too late

congratulations (n/a), Thursday, 12 September 2013 21:48 (three years ago) Permalink

you can only hope that they can convert that trauma into artistic success. it's the best you can hope for.

congratulations (n/a), Thursday, 12 September 2013 21:48 (three years ago) Permalink

Anxious kid high fives to sunny and how's life.

FYI I don't think my parents did anything to make me anxious as a kid (all of their traumatic parenting mistakes came later lolol). My mom has told me that she went against all of the parenting advice of the day about not picking up crying babies, etc. I just had a lot of trouble on my tiny mind.

carl agatha, Thursday, 12 September 2013 22:03 (three years ago) Permalink

I find there's a lot of nuance to all these things that isn't really covered by any of the advice books/methods, whether Sears, Ferber, or the French asshole who runs Tribeca Pediatrics and whose name I have probably deliberately blocked out (he advocates full cry it out at 2 months). For example, there are different kinds of cries, especially when they get older and more cognizant, and you start to learn the differences. So I find the Sears idea that if you don't respond to every cry you're somehow sending a message to your child that his needs don't matter a little hysterical, and at the same time I find the idea of not responding as a policy very cold and gross. And there are also certain kinds of cries that are just hysterical, overtired or overhungry cries where your "response" doesn't matter unless it's food or putting them to sleep.

#fomo that's the motto (Hurting 2), Thursday, 12 September 2013 22:16 (three years ago) Permalink

that's one of the joys of parenting, never knowing if something you're doing is causing lifelong trauma until it's too late

― congratulations (n/a), Thursday, September 12, 2013 5:48 PM (Yesterday) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

lol otm sadly

marcos, Friday, 13 September 2013 13:23 (three years ago) Permalink

I find there's a lot of nuance to all these things that isn't really covered by any of the advice books/methods, whether Sears, Ferber, or the French asshole who runs Tribeca Pediatrics and whose name I have probably deliberately blocked out (he advocates full cry it out at 2 months). For example, there are different kinds of cries, especially when they get older and more cognizant, and you start to learn the differences. So I find the Sears idea that if you don't respond to every cry you're somehow sending a message to your child that his needs don't matter a little hysterical, and at the same time I find the idea of not responding as a policy very cold and gross. And there are also certain kinds of cries that are just hysterical, overtired or overhungry cries where your "response" doesn't matter unless it's food or putting them to sleep.

― #fomo that's the motto (Hurting 2), Thursday, September 12, 2013 6:16 PM (Yesterday) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

also otm

marcos, Friday, 13 September 2013 13:25 (three years ago) Permalink

we feel like J is in a transitional napping place right now. he still does a short morning nap around 9am or so, and a longer afternoon nap from 1:30-3pm roughly. we're thinking we'll eliminate the morning nap pretty soon, though J can still be crabby enough that it seems necessary for the time being.

marcos, Friday, 13 September 2013 13:27 (three years ago) Permalink

The long afternoon nap is a beautiful thing. I think my enjoyment of life went up like 50% once that happened -- you have more time do do stuff with the family on weekend mornings cuz you don't have to rush back, and then you get a nice long afternoon break.

#fomo that's the motto (Hurting 2), Friday, 13 September 2013 14:06 (three years ago) Permalink

yea i'm excited about going down to one nap. i remember when we we're still at 3 naps a day and it seemed like you basically couldn't do anything (though we took a lot of long walks with J sleeping in the ergo). going down to 2 naps seemed like our day totally opened up, though it doesn't feel that way anymore

marcos, Friday, 13 September 2013 14:09 (three years ago) Permalink

Obvs can never really know if there was some deeper trauma from it though.

― #fomo that's the motto (Hurting 2), Thursday, September 12, 2013 4:47 PM (Yesterday) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

i seriously doubt it. i know a lot of my fears relating to this I project on them.

For example, there are different kinds of cries, especially when they get older and more cognizant, and you start to learn the differences.

This is definitely key.

"Max's Original Starship" Vol. 3 (sunny successor), Friday, 13 September 2013 14:37 (three years ago) Permalink

Beatrice was such a terrible sleeper as an infant. she'd sleep for max an hour at a time. Usually more like 10-20 minutes. We ended up buying a miracle blanket after trying pretty much everything else and she got a solid 8-12 hrs a night from that point on. Even when she grew out of it she maybe woke up one a night.

"Max's Original Starship" Vol. 3 (sunny successor), Friday, 13 September 2013 14:45 (three years ago) Permalink

ha, the miracle blanket! it's amazing: 1) how much things change week to week, month to month, in that first year; and 2) how much i totally forget about those earlier changes! i had to think for a few minutes, "miracle blanket, miracle blanket, i know i've heard about this" and i google it and remember that, oh yea, we put J in that swaddle every day in the first 3 months. lol

marcos, Friday, 13 September 2013 14:50 (three years ago) Permalink

it really is a miracle!!

"Max's Original Starship" Vol. 3 (sunny successor), Friday, 13 September 2013 21:09 (three years ago) Permalink

its the only thing i give at baby showers and it never ever gets used. im not sure why. i did give one to pp's best friend and his wife fairly recently and when their kiddo was a few months old we got a 2am text just saying "THANK YOU"

"Max's Original Starship" Vol. 3 (sunny successor), Friday, 13 September 2013 21:11 (three years ago) Permalink

miracle blanket never did anything for us, at least no more than standard swaddling, but i know it works for lots of people

we've started a new routine where we put her down but only stay in her room for 10 minutes (telling her how much time is left), then we leave, we close her bedroom door most of the way but i sit in the hallway where she can see me but can't talk to me. it's still an incremental move to her going to sleep by herself but this way i can play on my phone while waiting for her to fall asleep instead of just sitting in the dark, which makes it more tolerable. she had an epic tantrum the first night but since then it's been pretty smooth.

congratulations (n/a), Friday, 13 September 2013 21:12 (three years ago) Permalink

I have no idea why I started reading this thread, but a couple of my friends have been won over by this. I had to google it to even find out wtf it is:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Easidream-Ewan-the-Dream-Sheep/dp/B0040JSN7Y

kinder, Sunday, 15 September 2013 16:46 (three years ago) Permalink

xp yea as i mentioned we used the miracle blanket all the time b/c it was much easier to get a cozy swaddling wrap than by using a regular blanket. so we appreciated the 4 or 5 blankets we received as gifts from people

marcos, Monday, 16 September 2013 14:16 (three years ago) Permalink

lol naps, after the first six months we should have been so lucky

Euler, Monday, 16 September 2013 14:18 (three years ago) Permalink

as to "sleep training": I'm just glad we made it out alive and still married.

Euler, Monday, 16 September 2013 14:19 (three years ago) Permalink

^^^ this

"Max's Original Starship" Vol. 3 (sunny successor), Monday, 16 September 2013 14:29 (three years ago) Permalink


You must be logged in to post. Please either login here, or if you are not registered, you may register here.