scene individable, or POLL unlimited: works of william shakespeare

Message Bookmarked
Bookmark Removed

just gonna leave this here a couple months

dates are a little arbitrary of me but within range. he really churned it out, huh

Poll Results

OptionVotes
King Lear (1605) 11
The Tempest (1611) 7
Macbeth (1606) 6
Hamlet (1602) 6
Cymbeline (1610) 4
Twelfth Night (1601) 3
Julius Caesar (1599) 2
Much Ado about Nothing (1598) 2
Othello (1603) 2
Titus Andronicus (1592) 2
Measure for Measure (1603) 1
Hate this guy 1
Henry V (1599) 1
The Winter's Tale (1609) 1
Henry IV, Part 2 (1598) 1
The Comedy of Errors (1594) 1
A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595) 1
Henry IV, Part 1 (1597) 0
Antony and Cleopatra (1606) 0
Pericles, Prince of Tyre (1607) 0
Coriolanus (1608) 0
Henry VI, Part 1 (1592) 0
Henry VI, Part 3 (1591) 0
Henry VI, Part 2 (1591) 0
Henry VIII (1612) 0
The Two Noble Kinsmen (1613) 0
I like the sonnets 0
The Taming of the Shrew (1592) 0
All's Well That Ends Well (1605) 0
Richard III (1593) 0
The Merry Wives of Windsor (1597) 0
The Merchant of Venice (1596) 0
King John (1596) 0
Romeo and Juliet (1595) 0
As You Like It (1600) 0
Richard II (1595) 0
Troilus and Cressida (1601) 0
Love's Labour's Lost (+ lost sequel Love's Labour's Won) (1595) 0
Edward III (1593) 0
The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1590 or before) 0


difficult listening hour, Saturday, 20 January 2018 04:19 (nine months ago) Permalink

Hamlet (1602)
Measure for Measure (1603)
Othello (1603)
King Lear (1605)
All's Well That Ends Well (1605)
Macbeth (1606)
Antony and Cleopatra (1606)

look fuck off

difficult listening hour, Saturday, 20 January 2018 04:20 (nine months ago) Permalink

Richard II (1595)
Romeo and Juliet (1595)
A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595)

v lyrical stretch here. trying new things

difficult listening hour, Saturday, 20 January 2018 04:24 (nine months ago) Permalink

Henry VI, Part 1 (1592)
The Taming of the Shrew (1592)
Titus Andronicus (1592)

hilariously hacky year: a prequel, a meanspirited sex comedy, and gorn

difficult listening hour, Saturday, 20 January 2018 04:28 (nine months ago) Permalink

then coming off that: richard iii. about how it plays imo.

difficult listening hour, Saturday, 20 January 2018 04:30 (nine months ago) Permalink

if henry iv were one play i might vote for it over whichever of that absolutely absurd 1602-06 sequence of tragedies i end up at. as it is, dark horses include midsummer's (presages hamlet's trippiness), julius caesar (protip for your modern production: less vulgar winking about trump, more theater of cruelty-- cinna the poet should make them carry out the sobbing toddlers they shouldn't have brought), okay 2 henry iv still (i like not such grinning honour as sir walter hath) and uh lol romeo and juliet actually (sexy potboiler for teenagers lowkey about death and time). i have v 8th-grade taste in shakespeare. if you are more sophisticated, consider richard ii or something.

difficult listening hour, Saturday, 20 January 2018 05:07 (nine months ago) Permalink

King Lear, every day of the week

Twelfth Night in the comedy subdivision

The Bridge of Ban Louis J (silby), Saturday, 20 January 2018 05:14 (nine months ago) Permalink

yeah voted lear w/o much debate

Clay, Saturday, 20 January 2018 05:19 (nine months ago) Permalink

hamlet-othello-lear is an amazing crescendo and poss even a dialectic (psychedelic deconstruction of human experience ---> okay again, BUT EVIL ---> BOTH AT ONCE??? idk) but sometimes i think (fear?) the only point to any of it is to pass thru it so as to report from the nihilistic horizon of macbeth. to return would be as tedious as to go o'er.

difficult listening hour, Saturday, 20 January 2018 05:29 (nine months ago) Permalink

(but you get to return anyway, to tony+cleo the hangover movie: lush, languorous, camp, full of sex talk and slapstick, in the end wholly commandeered by as alive an egomaniac as hamlet or iago and carried away into death to leave us to live with bureaucracy. love's like an astronaut: it comes back but it's never the same)

difficult listening hour, Saturday, 20 January 2018 05:48 (nine months ago) Permalink

(and antony, enthroned in the marketplace, did sit alone, whistling to the air, which, but for vacancy, had gone to gaze on cleopatra too, and made a gap in nature)

difficult listening hour, Saturday, 20 January 2018 05:56 (nine months ago) Permalink

A & C is generally underrated, but not quite at the top o' the heap. Lear nips in ahead, as does Hamlet. Midsummer Night's Dream in the comedy subdivision. Richard II among the English history plays.

A is for (Aimless), Saturday, 20 January 2018 06:06 (nine months ago) Permalink

this reminds me i need to watch the 1935 version of Midsummer Night's Dream. i've only really read Macbeth and R&O and that was back in high school. at any rate i still need to read most of these.

fwiw i actually spent last in a wikipedia hole reading about one of the texts that influenced King Lear, A Declaration of Egregious Popish Impostures

https://www.bl.uk/collection-items/a-declaration-of-egregious-popish-impostures-by-samuel-harsnett-1603

this lead me to read about what "popish" mean, leading me to read about the Popish Conspiracy, etc., etc., on and on and suddenly it's 2am lol

AdamVania (Adam Bruneau), Saturday, 20 January 2018 15:39 (nine months ago) Permalink

Lear or Tempest, probably the latter cos everybody loves Lear

will maintain for the rest of my life that Hamlet is a deliberate spoof on revenge tragedies

hell is auteur people (Noodle Vague), Saturday, 20 January 2018 15:51 (nine months ago) Permalink

Macbeth for me I'm a simple man of simple terrors

remember the lmao (darraghmac), Saturday, 20 January 2018 15:52 (nine months ago) Permalink

i have to think on it but i think macbeth maybe for me too

Mordy, Saturday, 20 January 2018 15:57 (nine months ago) Permalink

My Shakespeare prof at college made a really good observation (he may have been quoting someone else) that had Shakespeare's plays had not been easy for him to write they would have been impossible. The rate he cranked them out, the difficulty of revision, the consistency and quality, writing with quill, by candlelight ...

Josh in Chicago, Saturday, 20 January 2018 16:02 (nine months ago) Permalink

I read Titus Andronicus and watched the Anthony Hopkins film recently and actually loved it. Something intense about the sheer hate and brutality. Answer is probably Hamlet rn.

No purposes. Sounds. (Sund4r), Saturday, 20 January 2018 16:30 (nine months ago) Permalink

Torn between, oh, 11 or 12 of these.

Josh in Chicago, Saturday, 20 January 2018 16:33 (nine months ago) Permalink

Lear is the best but also the hardest to go back to, especially as I and mine get older

for repeat entertainment value, Macbeth (murder, horror, tight running time) just edges Hamlet (murder, horror, smartmouth emo lead, but tl;dr)

Brad C., Saturday, 20 January 2018 16:42 (nine months ago) Permalink

Is this a dragger etc

remember the lmao (darraghmac), Saturday, 20 January 2018 16:54 (nine months ago) Permalink

Tempest has the best words I don't know what else matters

hell is auteur people (Noodle Vague), Saturday, 20 January 2018 17:06 (nine months ago) Permalink

I'm pretty sick of Hamlet atm. Seen too many in the last few years.

Heavy Messages (jed_), Saturday, 20 January 2018 17:07 (nine months ago) Permalink

Hamlet 2 was pretty dope tho

AdamVania (Adam Bruneau), Saturday, 20 January 2018 17:11 (nine months ago) Permalink

I didn’t care for Polonius: A Hamlet Story

The Bridge of Ban Louis J (silby), Saturday, 20 January 2018 17:14 (nine months ago) Permalink

Voted for Lear. Macbeth and Tempest, though!

Cherish, Saturday, 20 January 2018 18:00 (nine months ago) Permalink

King Lear (Peter Brook, 1971)

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 20 January 2018 18:05 (nine months ago) Permalink

I also liked Joss Whedon's film of Much Ado About Nothing as well. Those are my two fave Shakeys on film.

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 20 January 2018 18:07 (nine months ago) Permalink

Throne of Blood might be my fav Macbeth

The Bridge of Ban Louis J (silby), Saturday, 20 January 2018 18:29 (nine months ago) Permalink

Always feeling it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wNhGhVvUcu8

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 20 January 2018 18:33 (nine months ago) Permalink

Macbeth.

I mean..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a-Y7xxnMiXg

piscesx, Saturday, 20 January 2018 19:15 (nine months ago) Permalink

for repeat entertainment value, Macbeth (murder, horror, tight running time) just edges Hamlet (murder, horror, smartmouth emo lead, but tl;dr)

For repeat entertainment value, little beats Richard III. For depth and wisdom, maybe Lear, or in some ways, maybe The Tempest, which is his most self aware and a fine sendoff.

Someone should poll all the different radical "Richard III in space" or whatever adaptations of Shakespeare.

Josh in Chicago, Saturday, 20 January 2018 19:15 (nine months ago) Permalink

The Tempest is easily the strangest of his great works. It works fantastically as an insubstantial pageant, but the allegorical elements are insufficiently meshed together to withstand scrutiny, which weakens it.

A is for (Aimless), Saturday, 20 January 2018 19:22 (nine months ago) Permalink

I've heard it described as sort of a Shakespeare's greatest hits: magic and mix-ups, romantic entanglements, father and daughter stuff ... missing the history, I guess. And Prospero's final monologue is like the Bard taking a bow.

Josh in Chicago, Saturday, 20 January 2018 19:25 (nine months ago) Permalink

t/s reading vs watching/listening

read a lot of the plays through school / undergrad but i'm not sure i really began to love Shakespeare (or even that i necessarily "got it" to any great extent) until i found torrents with the complete sets of BBC tv performances and Arkangel audio versions (god bless these latter-day Robin Hoods, whoever they are). the BBC performances are a particular treat cause they're full of performers who were all over Radio 4 in the 70s and 80s so you'll be sitting there watching e.g. Julius Caesar and you'll suddenly realise that the bloke playing Cassius was also the voice of Legolas in the Brian Sibley radio adaptation of LOTR and it's like unexpectedly meeting an old and cherished friend and i just love it

the answer to the poll is probably Lear but i'm going to throw a vote to Julius Caesar because it's in my head now and i get quite sentimental when i think of Brutus

Windsor Davies, Saturday, 20 January 2018 20:02 (nine months ago) Permalink

Got my bedtime reading for the next couple of months sorted then!

cajunsunday, Saturday, 20 January 2018 20:03 (nine months ago) Permalink

Every time I reread Anthony and Cleopatra I'm gobsmacked by the number of speaking roles -- is it his largest cast of characters? I mean, fuckin' Taurus gets a line.

morning wood truancy (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 20 January 2018 20:41 (nine months ago) Permalink

I bet one of the biggest casts is one of the Henry plays.

I know most words is Hamlet (the character) by some fair amount.

Josh in Chicago, Saturday, 20 January 2018 21:35 (nine months ago) Permalink

i have only been exposed to half the work (if that), so i would probably yield a very predictable top 5.

also best not to mention how much i like Taming of the Shrew

ice cream social justice (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 20 January 2018 23:24 (nine months ago) Permalink

post completely in character: i like hamlet the best

#TeamHailing (imago), Saturday, 20 January 2018 23:31 (nine months ago) Permalink

Ophelia is such a lovely name, it's a shame it's tough to name someone after her. Same with Desdemona, to a slightly lesser extent.

Josh in Chicago, Saturday, 20 January 2018 23:33 (nine months ago) Permalink

trying to imagine all the theatre criticks paying heed to his each new play like idk kendrick lamar albums or something nowadays

like, he drops a midsummer night's dream and everyone looks at each other - the 'richard iii guy' is legit, fucking legit

#TeamHailing (imago), Saturday, 20 January 2018 23:33 (nine months ago) Permalink

Anthony & Cleopatra is the one that I've read the most and feel like I know the best. But I love The Tempest and Midsummer Night's Dream.

jmm, Saturday, 20 January 2018 23:36 (nine months ago) Permalink

I've only seen Hamlet staged twice, well over 25 years ago, but guess who played the lead both times?

http://www.lortel.org/Archives/Production/1814

http://www.lortel.org/Archives/Production/1253

ice cream social justice (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 20 January 2018 23:48 (nine months ago) Permalink

ha!

#TeamHailing (imago), Saturday, 20 January 2018 23:50 (nine months ago) Permalink

Not to mention pre-Niles Crane as Laertes in the first one.

I've never seen a live Lear, but James Earl Jones as Othello is the greatest Shakespeare performance I've seen (1982, with Christopher Plummer as Iago).

ice cream social justice (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 20 January 2018 23:51 (nine months ago) Permalink

caught antony sher as iago as a schoolboy - really quite something

#TeamHailing (imago), Saturday, 20 January 2018 23:59 (nine months ago) Permalink

Sher is bringing his Lear to New York in the spring.

ice cream social justice (Dr Morbius), Sunday, 21 January 2018 00:05 (eight months ago) Permalink

Cymbeline

flappy bird, Sunday, 21 January 2018 00:13 (eight months ago) Permalink

Iago as schoolboy sounds interesting

remember the lmao (darraghmac), Sunday, 21 January 2018 00:41 (eight months ago) Permalink

Here's what wiki says:

The modern text of King Lear derives from three sources: two quartos, published in 1608 (Q1) and 1619 (Q2) respectively, and the version in the First Folio of 1623 (F1). The differences between these versions are significant. Q1 contains 285 lines not in F1; F1 contains around 100 lines not in Q1. Also, at least a thousand individual words are changed between the two texts, each text has a completely different style of punctuation, and about half the verse lines in the F1 are either printed as prose or differently divided in the Q1. The early editors, beginning with Alexander Pope, simply conflated the two texts, creating the modern version that has remained nearly universal for centuries. The conflated version is born from the hypothesis that Shakespeare wrote only one original manuscript, now unfortunately lost, and that the Quarto and Folio versions are distortions of that original. Others, such as Nuttall and Bloom, have identified Shakespeare himself as having been involved in reworking passages in the play to accommodate performances and other textual requirements of the play.

As early as 1931, Madeleine Doran suggested that the two texts had basically different provenances, and that these differences between them were critically interesting. This argument, however, was not widely discussed until the late 1970s, when it was revived, principally by Michael Warren and Gary Taylor. Their thesis, while controversial, has gained significant acceptance. It posits, essentially, that the Quarto derives from something close to Shakespeare's foul papers, and the Folio is drawn in some way from a promptbook, prepared for production by Shakespeare's company or someone else. In short, Q1 is "authorial"; F1 is "theatrical". In criticism, the rise of "revision criticism" has been part of the pronounced trend away from mid-century formalism

Josh in Chicago, Monday, 22 January 2018 13:27 (eight months ago) Permalink

The thing about translations of Shakespeare is that people have been doing it for hundreds of years, and some of it has entered foreign languages as well. 'At være eller ikke at være, det er spørgsmålet'

Frederik B, Monday, 22 January 2018 13:30 (eight months ago) Permalink

that's what I said to my Lyft driver last week!

morning wood truancy (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 22 January 2018 13:34 (eight months ago) Permalink

I wrote 'Frederikke B' as a hilarious linguistic zing, but then realised I was colonising the Danish language, but I'm posting it anyway

#TeamHailing (imago), Monday, 22 January 2018 13:41 (eight months ago) Permalink

I went to high school with her.

Frederik B, Monday, 22 January 2018 13:44 (eight months ago) Permalink

I think errors is hilarious

YouTube_-_funy_cats.flv (Jimmy The Mod Awaits The Return Of His Beloved), Monday, 22 January 2018 15:37 (eight months ago) Permalink

for me the really mindblowing artist's farewell is when cleo issues her orders to the snake.

Totally, and there's something uncanny about the clown in that scene: "for, indeed, there is no goodness in worm."

"If thou and nature can so gently part, the stroke of death is as a lover's pinch, which hurts, and is desired."

jmm, Monday, 22 January 2018 18:35 (eight months ago) Permalink

i was watching attack of the clones the other day, and there's that unfortunate digression where threepio's head gets switched with the head of one of the useless battle droids, and he flails around a while ruining the otherwise pretty good battle of geonosis set piece, and then artoo restores him and he stumbles to his feet and says "i've had the most peculiar dream!" and i was suddenly like, wait a second

― difficult listening hour, Monday, January 22, 2018 3:25 AM (nineteen hours ago) Bookmark

Tom Stoppard did some uncredited (shockingly) script work on the prequels

Number None, Monday, 22 January 2018 23:13 (eight months ago) Permalink

performance vs. reading is always a tough one w/ shakespeare. lear is so crushingly dark at the end, feels like no performance could do justice to that. the whole thing feels, not epic exactly, but expansive, like it's somehow taken in the whole of human experience. the end of the play feels like the end of everything. the only thing i can think of that makes me feel similarly is moby dick, tho of course that's self-consciously epic.

there are a few roles in shakespeare that seem almost beyond performing. hamlet is one -- i've seen good productions but never saw a guy doing hamlet and thought, that's the guy i imagine when i read the play. always find myself thinking that the best performances were probably from the pre-film era.

(The Other) J.D. (J.D.), Monday, 22 January 2018 23:28 (eight months ago) Permalink

I love the romantic atmosphere in Tempest, which is probably what I'll vote for -- though I'm a bit surprised that I'm the not the first to mention Cymbeline! It's kind of action-adventure with, IIRC, a female action(y) lead (Imogen!). If I'm misremembering, then she at least gets to do a lot of cool stuff.

Favorite stage performance was a college production of Coriolanus. Favorite film adaptation is a tie between Ran and Taymor's Titus. (Wish I could see her old stage Tempest -- the clips look amazing.)

Joanna NEU!some (Leee), Tuesday, 23 January 2018 02:04 (eight months ago) Permalink

(I guess I like violent spectacles.)

Joanna NEU!some (Leee), Tuesday, 23 January 2018 02:15 (eight months ago) Permalink

I have never seen a satisfying performance of Lear...the ending always destroys me even when the production is terrible, though.

horseshoe, Tuesday, 23 January 2018 10:10 (eight months ago) Permalink

Timon of Athens is missing :-(

Not that it'd win, like.

But doctor, I am Camille Paglia (Bananaman Begins), Tuesday, 23 January 2018 12:07 (eight months ago) Permalink

that's a pretty sad one! it has more of a processional, o.g. greek feel to its tragedy (as you'd imagine) and no women. good play though

#TeamHailing (imago), Tuesday, 23 January 2018 12:18 (eight months ago) Permalink

How is it possible this has never been polled before?

Matt DC, Tuesday, 23 January 2018 12:19 (eight months ago) Permalink

Another good poll would be fave secondary characters. Yr Falstaffs and Calibans and Bottoms. (Falstaff may or may not count since he got promoted to lead of his own play.)

a man often referred to in the news media as the Duke of Saxony (tipsy mothra), Tuesday, 23 January 2018 12:54 (eight months ago) Permalink

What's secondary tho

remember the lmao (darraghmac), Tuesday, 23 January 2018 13:00 (eight months ago) Permalink

How is it possible this has never been polled before?

The Beatles don't appear in any of the plays

the girl with the rub-on tattoo (Noodle Vague), Tuesday, 23 January 2018 13:08 (eight months ago) Permalink

Lear for the text.

It's not my favourite Shakespeare performance though - the Kevin R McNally performance last year was the only Lear I've seen and it was pretty good but def. missing something. The Peter Brook film also leaves me a bit cold. I do love what Kurosawa did with the structure in Ran (1985) though.

Awfully fond of Othello too. Cannot bloody wait for the André Holland and Mark Rylance performance at the Globe in August.

call me by your name..or Finn (fionnland), Tuesday, 23 January 2018 13:41 (eight months ago) Permalink

Another good poll would be fave secondary characters. Yr Falstaffs and Calibans and Bottoms. (Falstaff may or may not count since he got promoted to lead of his own play.)

Never actually read or seen Falstaff's Wedding or anything similar, I'm guessing there's an Elizabethan Joey vibe going down?

Another spin-off poll we did a few years ago:

The 2000-year period of Shakespearean tragedy is one inbred clusterfuck all happening at the same time. Who becomes king?

Matt DC, Tuesday, 23 January 2018 13:44 (eight months ago) Permalink

my campaigning for Vincentio to the general silence of all = actually I kind of stand by that

#TeamHailing (imago), Tuesday, 23 January 2018 13:54 (eight months ago) Permalink

MFM is amazing and up there with all the other best ones

#TeamHailing (imago), Tuesday, 23 January 2018 13:54 (eight months ago) Permalink

Ugh I saw Measure for Measure a couple years ago and found it almost loathesome. Maybe worth a read instead.

direct to consumer online mattress brand (silby), Tuesday, 23 January 2018 15:46 (eight months ago) Permalink

MacDuff becomes king but only offstage after

remember the lmao (darraghmac), Tuesday, 23 January 2018 15:49 (eight months ago) Permalink

MFM is surely loathsome - it is about how a dictator cements his power using underhand tactics, and redoubles his popularity into the bargain

#TeamHailing (imago), Tuesday, 23 January 2018 15:51 (eight months ago) Permalink

The total rancidity of Measure for Measure is its main virtue imo.

Matt DC, Tuesday, 23 January 2018 16:02 (eight months ago) Permalink

exactly

#TeamHailing (imago), Tuesday, 23 January 2018 16:09 (eight months ago) Permalink

in which shakespeare bodies politics ancient and modern

#TeamHailing (imago), Tuesday, 23 January 2018 16:10 (eight months ago) Permalink

Currently teaching Macbeth again. I should probably whisper it but this is the first time it's felt, I don't know, a bit two dimensional. Maybe it's me.
I bloody love the Tempest, and on balance it probably has my favourite lines, but there's too much of the mistaken identity faff arseing around in between.
I've never read or seen Lear. I'm ashamed of this.
Of the minor plays, I think Pericles is my favourite.

I'd have to go for Hamlet, even if I think I might be on the cusp of falling away from it.

The shard-borne beetle with his drowsy hums (Chinaski), Friday, 26 January 2018 19:42 (eight months ago) Permalink

I’m seeing a production of Timon of Athens in a couple days, I know next to nothing about it.

JoeStork, Friday, 26 January 2018 19:46 (eight months ago) Permalink

basically: if you're having money troubles you shouldn't see it

imago, Friday, 26 January 2018 19:49 (eight months ago) Permalink

Did anyone watch the show Slings and Arrows, set at a Canadian theatre modeled after the Stratford Festival? It’s kind of an uneven show but has a number of really fantastic moments that dig into what makes these plays work and the difficulty in staging them effectively. The second season revolves around a production of MacBeth, which the director admits he dislikes - a side character argues that it only shows you evil, and teaches you nothing about it. Which I wouldn’t necessarily agree with, but I should reread the play.

JoeStork, Friday, 26 January 2018 19:53 (eight months ago) Permalink

Belated post but The Globe's summer theater season tickets are available as of a couple days ago. The groundling tickets for a fiver cannot be beaten for value if you don't mind standing for three hours (I'm happy to do it at gigs for a better view so why not the theatre?).

Hamlet, The Two Noble Kinsmen and As You Like it booked for when I'm down in June. Haven't actually read the latter two yet, but will hopefully get round to it soon.

Othello in August is what I'm looking forward to the most though (Mark Rylance as Iago, oh boy).

call me by your name..or Finn (fionnland), Thursday, 1 February 2018 10:02 (eight months ago) Permalink

Super-envious of Rylance as Iago. I saw the National's slightly-less-than-satisfactory production a few years ago, and while I didn't love the cramped staging, I did love Rory Kinnear as Iago.

I am seeing three Macbeths this year. Very excited for all of them.

trishyb, Thursday, 1 February 2018 11:26 (eight months ago) Permalink

Oh I saw Kinnear in Young Marx last year and he was superb! Isn't he playing the lead in one of your anticipated Macbeths? I'm guessing the National production.

call me by your name..or Finn (fionnland), Thursday, 1 February 2018 12:20 (eight months ago) Permalink

We'll be in Ashland, Oregon this summer during their epic Shakespeare fest, but I forget which play might be going on on our exact date. Twelfth Night, maybe?

Josh in Chicago, Thursday, 1 February 2018 14:09 (eight months ago) Permalink

Oof, Rylance as Iago. Have booked a couple of yard tickets. Thanks for the heads up.

The shard-borne beetle with his drowsy hums (Chinaski), Thursday, 1 February 2018 16:50 (eight months ago) Permalink

Timon of Athens was nicely performed but really weird, I get the sense WS wasn’t in a great place when he wrote (or co-wrote, I guess) this one. There’s a strange lack of drama to the entire thing, Timon doesn’t seem to be particularly important or notable even when he’s rich, and his character arc is just cheerful——>hate u all with nothing in between and no moment of greater understanding. Artimaeus’s endless shit-talking is pretty fun but i was a little puzzled as to why anyone invited him to their parties.

JoeStork, Thursday, 1 February 2018 17:34 (eight months ago) Permalink

From this (as usual, v funny) Thomas Bernhard play:

http://shirtysleeves.blogspot.co.uk/2018/02/an-alternative-translation-of-minetti.html

It was a real conquest
to get me to play Lear
one more time
and also a crowning moment
Just one more performance madam
then never again
I’ve sworn it
never again
just one more performance
Thirty years I’ve shunned the stage
thirty years of nothing
I have renounced all classic literature
except Lear
Now just one more time I’ll play Lear
in Ensor’s mask
My nerves are frayed
it’s this appalling climate you see

xyzzzz__, Sunday, 11 February 2018 22:25 (eight months ago) Permalink

one month passes...

Automatic thread bump. This poll is closing tomorrow.

System, Wednesday, 14 March 2018 00:01 (seven months ago) Permalink

Automatic thread bump. This poll's results are now in.

System, Thursday, 15 March 2018 00:01 (seven months ago) Permalink

We'll be in Ashland, Oregon this summer during their epic Shakespeare fest, but I forget which play might be going on on our exact date. Twelfth Night, maybe?

― Josh in Chicago, Thursday, February 1, 2018 2:09 PM (one month ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

I'd want to see this there - https://www.osfashland.org/productions/2018-plays/manahatta.aspx

Moo Vaughn, Thursday, 15 March 2018 00:04 (seven months ago) Permalink

I'm not certain what my favorite is, but probably would have voted for As You Like It on the correct assumption it would get relatively little attention from others

Moo Vaughn, Thursday, 15 March 2018 00:08 (seven months ago) Permalink

Whoa @ 4 whole Cymbeline voters!

MarmiteGrrrl (Leee), Thursday, 15 March 2018 00:18 (seven months ago) Permalink

that play is trash xp

YouTube_-_funy_cats.flv (Jimmy The Mod Awaits The Return Of His Beloved), Thursday, 15 March 2018 00:29 (seven months ago) Permalink

manahatta I mean

YouTube_-_funy_cats.flv (Jimmy The Mod Awaits The Return Of His Beloved), Thursday, 15 March 2018 00:30 (seven months ago) Permalink

surprised to see the tempest so high and the dream so low

i think i voted hamlet, corny but that's where my head's at rn. v happy with the hamlet/macbeth tie, a deadlock

wish i'd thrown tony+cleo a vote tho jeez

difficult listening hour, Thursday, 15 March 2018 23:02 (seven months ago) Permalink

No shame in Hamlet stanning.

My favorites are probably Measure for Measure, Winter's Tale, Twelfth Night, As You Like It, Hamlet.

I had a friend in college who lit into me about preferring Ham to Lear, saying "Hamlet is the 19th century man's play. Look to Lear. The problems of Lear are the problems we're concerned with in the 20th century."

It was 1990 then, so the play of the 21st century had yet to be determined.

Starlight Express, maybe?

I leprecan't even. (Ye Mad Puffin), Thursday, 15 March 2018 23:09 (seven months ago) Permalink

hamlet again

difficult listening hour, Thursday, 15 March 2018 23:17 (seven months ago) Permalink

(nah it's macbeth obv.)

difficult listening hour, Thursday, 15 March 2018 23:18 (seven months ago) Permalink


You must be logged in to post. Please either login here, or if you are not registered, you may register here.