Your Retirement Savings

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Poll Closing Date: Wednesday, 28 February 2018 00:00 (in 1 week)

Mentioned in the economy shitbin thread, how much have you saved for retirement? I added a few more options.

$0 saved
Less than $1,000
$1,000 to $4,999
$5,000 to $9,999
$10,000 to $50,000
$50,000 to $100,000
$100,000 or more


Jeff, Friday, 9 February 2018 11:38 (one week ago) Permalink

This will sound like gloating but in Australia 9.5% of every paycheck you ever earn goes into a superannuation fund. This seems like a good system.

American Fear of Pranksterism (Ed), Friday, 9 February 2018 11:49 (one week ago) Permalink

This will sound like gloating but in Australia 9.5% of every paycheck you ever earn goes into a superannuation fund. This seems like a good system.

American Fear of Pranksterism (Ed), Friday, 9 February 2018 11:49 (one week ago) Permalink

i won't be retiring

"oh no my cheds" man had dark to black packet (Noodle Vague), Friday, 9 February 2018 11:50 (one week ago) Permalink

my retirement plan is death

he facked his death (bizarro gazzara), Friday, 9 February 2018 11:50 (one week ago) Permalink

something to look forward to

he facked his death (bizarro gazzara), Friday, 9 February 2018 11:51 (one week ago) Permalink

My current job has a pension scheme so I assume by now it's over $1000. Banking on an early death tbh

Colonel Poo, Friday, 9 February 2018 11:52 (one week ago) Permalink

a big tent and a one-way ticket to Uzbekistan should do me

"oh no my cheds" man had dark to black packet (Noodle Vague), Friday, 9 February 2018 11:53 (one week ago) Permalink

pretty sure all tickets to uzbekistan are one-way iirc

he facked his death (bizarro gazzara), Friday, 9 February 2018 11:54 (one week ago) Permalink

Same as Ed, about 10% goes into a lol retiring fund. Thousands there I have a way better destination for rn tbh

Le Bateau Ivre, Friday, 9 February 2018 11:55 (one week ago) Permalink

Throughout the years of my working like I’ve done 10-12% or several years of nothing when I was too dumb to sign up for a 401k in my early jobs. For my new job I started last year I upped my savings per payday to 16%. 38 years old, seems prudent?

Jeff, Friday, 9 February 2018 11:55 (one week ago) Permalink

and get you showing off about buying a big tent, you’re clearly better-prepared for retirement than i am

he facked his death (bizarro gazzara), Friday, 9 February 2018 11:56 (one week ago) Permalink

I really need to get around to consolidating the last few retirement accounts from old jobs into my federal TSP

El Tomboto, Friday, 9 February 2018 11:59 (one week ago) Permalink

Defined benefit scheme so no cash value but it's a good un, presuming I don't get promoted and work til 66 I think it would be valued at that stage at something over a million

Actuarially speaking im quarter paid up so 250k I guess

I'm public sector btw but cant afford a house tbf

Alderweireld Horses (darraghmac), Friday, 9 February 2018 12:03 (one week ago) Permalink

Yeah, my retirement account is doing pretty well through no fault of my own. Paycheck to paycheck I'm tripping over my own dick.

how's life, Friday, 9 February 2018 12:14 (one week ago) Permalink

I’ve been contributing 10 to 15% of each paycheck for the last ten years to all stock funds. Company matches to a certain point and I’m full vested

calstars, Friday, 9 February 2018 12:22 (one week ago) Permalink

Much like deems, defined benefit, public sector, fully vested, etc. I’d hit 40 years service when I’m 63, another 16 years off, and if I fully cashed out then and there it would approach a million at current levels but that would also remove my medical insurance payments so no thanks — will stick with monthly payouts instead whenever I do retire.

Ned Raggett, Friday, 9 February 2018 12:47 (one week ago) Permalink

I have no idea. Nowhere near enough. Will be very disappointed if my plan to die on the job falls through.

I'm very active in the pegasus community (Old Lunch), Friday, 9 February 2018 12:57 (one week ago) Permalink

The last time I checked my account at Fidelity, it was gratifyingly robust. Then the market gyrations hit.

Polly of the Pre-Codes (j.lu), Friday, 9 February 2018 13:27 (one week ago) Permalink

I've been doing well with plugging 10% of my salary into a 401k for the past decade+. Don't yet know how any savings I've established is going to look once I send my son to college in a few years.

Moodles, Friday, 9 February 2018 14:07 (one week ago) Permalink

Fully vested public sector employee, bolstered by Roth IRAs and my own savings.

morning wood truancy (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 9 February 2018 14:22 (one week ago) Permalink

I've considered a Roth because why not. (Also suits my temper to just have the taxes paid already.) There's some supplementary money from the UC I have invested in a 401-ish setup that I treat rather casually; among other plans the UC offers a typical stocks/bonds mix that grows more conservative with time so it's sitting in that for the most part, and it'll tick over. My separate personal savings is for emergencies or some possible big purchase down the road, though with housing being what it is here, that's kinda unlikely.

Ned Raggett, Friday, 9 February 2018 14:33 (one week ago) Permalink

suicide I guess?

It's not delivery, it's Adorno! (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Friday, 9 February 2018 14:35 (one week ago) Permalink

I sure hope plasma clinics still exist by the time I'm in my sixties.

I'm very active in the pegasus community (Old Lunch), Friday, 9 February 2018 14:36 (one week ago) Permalink

I have low risk Roth IRAs (a redundant phrase, I guess), so the fluctuations of the market don't significantly affect it. Obviously it's done better in the last 15 months but not substantially so.

morning wood truancy (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 9 February 2018 14:38 (one week ago) Permalink

I do think about it. Basically I have great credit, I really try to maintain that, I think when I get old I will apply for shit loads of credit cards....legally emancipate my daughter, then filter whatever I can give to her in cash form, then sell her the house for $1 while I continue to live there. Then just use one credit card to keep paying the other minimum payments and keep that shell game going for as long as possible, then whatever declare bankruptcy or die or whatever and hopefully leave the credit card companies eating it

It's not delivery, it's Adorno! (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Friday, 9 February 2018 14:40 (one week ago) Permalink

oh yeah and also I figure while running up the credit cards if there still is social security I'll take those payments, withdraw the cash and put those in an offshore account or even safety deposit box under a different name and just go grab cash for stuff after the credit card game is up

It's not delivery, it's Adorno! (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Friday, 9 February 2018 14:45 (one week ago) Permalink

ums, how much do you charge for a retirement plan consultation, and can I pay you in pogs?

I'm very active in the pegasus community (Old Lunch), Friday, 9 February 2018 14:58 (one week ago) Permalink

Step 1: storage unit full of Beanie Babies
Step 2: ???
Step 3: retirement!

I'm very active in the pegasus community (Old Lunch), Friday, 9 February 2018 15:02 (one week ago) Permalink

I really like UMS's plan - $1 sale of the house is clever, but I think you should also budget for a good lawyer for your daughter. Legally emancipating her doesn't mean your creditors won't still try to lean on her to settle your estate.

For extra righteousness I might also say that your orgy of credit-card-fueled spending should probably shift away from local small businesses.ethically sourced whatsits, and more toward eeevil megacorps, as you get closer to financial self-immolation. Make sure all the people who get screwed over are the ones who deserve it.

I will finish what I (Ye Mad Puffin), Friday, 9 February 2018 15:16 (one week ago) Permalink

considering how much you need to retire shouldn't there either be a few more options or consolidate a bunch of these into one? is there a practical difference between having saved $3,000 or $9,000 or $15,000 or $30,000? or is that the pt? that whatever we've most likely done so far is hopelessly inadequate?

Mordy, Friday, 9 February 2018 15:17 (one week ago) Permalink

does anyone else worry about putting money aside for the future when maybe there will be no gov backing the dollar in the future?

a big tent and a one-way ticket to Uzbekistan should do me

i'd love to visit bukhara one day

Mordy, Friday, 9 February 2018 15:19 (one week ago) Permalink

Ripple guys ripple

Alderweireld Horses (darraghmac), Friday, 9 February 2018 15:20 (one week ago) Permalink

i have a meager IRA from a previous job that matched contributions, however, as i'm under 30 i wonder if i should just take that $ and use it to travel and whatnot before we go full waterworld

global tetrahedron, Friday, 9 February 2018 15:21 (one week ago) Permalink

Invest in sunscreen and swimwear.

I will finish what I (Ye Mad Puffin), Friday, 9 February 2018 15:25 (one week ago) Permalink

i have quite a bit but not as much as i should have; I withdrew a lot to buy a house six years ago, which was actually a good investment (so far). my company doesn't match unfortunately.

akm, Friday, 9 February 2018 15:29 (one week ago) Permalink

"does anyone else worry about putting money aside for the future when maybe there will be no gov backing the dollar in the future?"

all the time

akm, Friday, 9 February 2018 15:30 (one week ago) Permalink

I really like UMS's plan - $1 sale of the house is clever, but I think you should also budget for a good lawyer for your daughter. Legally emancipating her doesn't mean your creditors won't still try to lean on her to settle your estate.

For extra righteousness I might also say that your orgy of credit-card-fueled spending should probably shift away from local small businesses.ethically sourced whatsits, and more toward eeevil megacorps, as you get closer to financial self-immolation. Make sure all the people who get screwed over are the ones who deserve it.

― I will finish what I (Ye Mad Puffin), Friday, February 9, 2018 9:16 AM (thirty-seven minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

Thanks, that's good advice and also good point on screwing the big companies.

Old Lunch - sign up for my webinar "Dirtbag Retirement Planning"

Trump has been sort of...inspirational is the wrong word...but eye opening, like reading about him, it's like rich people act like crooks all the time why should I approach things like ooh save my pennies one at a time like a good little boy

Also inspired a couple of things...a friend's brother was getting divorced and they were broke as hell but his soon to be ex stayed in the house and just kept bullshitting and making payment agreements and sending them payments here and there as much as she could and it was FOUR years before she was evicted

also, my cousin does crop insurance and one of his adjusters is this older guy who went down post-Katrina with his wife in an RV to do freelance adjusting (there was obviously just shit tons of work down there)...anyway, he goes to check out this trailer park that had been destroyed, gets there and there's NOTHING left, like maybe a piece of sheet metal here and there or piece of wood, but like the things was erased...like it never existed...so like good luck trying to assess anything, he was just gonna write it up as a total loss for every person that could be shown to own a trailer there...

anyway, he's walking along the beach and he sees this sock...picks it up and it's full of cash. a lot. so he's like how the fuck would I ever trace who's money this was? so he takes it back, and him and his wife hang it up to dry like in a fuckin movie..anyway, it turns out to be more than $50,000....so he's real careful about it but it like fuck it, it's just gonna sit in some government office or something and they'll never get it to whose it was anyway...so they just keep the cash, don't buy anything crazy but just say hey this is food, groceries and clothing money...he got more than a decade out of it, just using it for those basics and paying in cash keeping the money in a safe

It's not delivery, it's Adorno! (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Friday, 9 February 2018 16:02 (one week ago) Permalink

but eye opening, like reading about him, it's like rich people act like crooks all the time why should I approach things like ooh save my pennies one at a time like a good little boy

on one hand yeah but otoh you want to be a better human than djt. not saying you can't bend the rules and be a good person (and sometimes maybe bending the rules is required to be a good person) but the way djt acts like a crook he leaves a lot of damage in his wake.

Mordy, Friday, 9 February 2018 16:03 (one week ago) Permalink

who am i damaging in my scenarios? (if you say banks or credit card companies i don't give a shit)

It's not delivery, it's Adorno! (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Friday, 9 February 2018 16:36 (one week ago) Permalink

back when i had a steady job i put 5% of every paycheck into retirement, which was matched by my employer. it is weird, now, outside of that job, to have ~$0 in my bank account but to have a decent amount stored away for "retirement" 35 years from now. hopefully i won't have to withdraw it early in order to make it through the next few decades

Karl Malone, Friday, 9 February 2018 16:50 (one week ago) Permalink

one of the many reasons I left the usa was that here I'm a civil servant with a nice pension plan. since I came here late it'll only be like 80% of my highest salary but that'll be plenty, especially since there'll be no health care costs. no college costs either (my older daughter will start higher ed this fall, if we were still in the usa I have no idea how we'd have handled that, I guess the usual loan thing)

droit au butt (Euler), Friday, 9 February 2018 16:56 (one week ago) Permalink

https://i.imgur.com/kV3v7oZ.png

this is good presumably. anyway, i play along to an extent with the conceit that in 30y time the world financial markets will still be intact. but i am p close to converting my retirement plan contribution into a canned goods and ammunition stockpile fund

Roberto Spiralli, Friday, 9 February 2018 16:58 (one week ago) Permalink

considering how much you need to retire shouldn't there either be a few more options or consolidate a bunch of these into one?

I worry that my savings are inadequate and I'm in the highest category (albeit barely)

sarahell, Friday, 9 February 2018 17:02 (one week ago) Permalink

I have a 401k, but have not been able to contribute more than a couple % of my income to it for many years. I've also borrowed from it twice, once to buy a home (stupid, I know) so I'm paying that back rather than accumulating new retirement savings. The recent fluctuations didn't hit me too badly because with the help of our company's advisor my portfolio is VERY conservative.

Millennial Whoop, wanna fight about it? (Phil D.), Friday, 9 February 2018 17:11 (one week ago) Permalink

Although last year I was getting like an 11-12% return, now I'm getting 2.66% YTD. Thanks, Trump!

Millennial Whoop, wanna fight about it? (Phil D.), Friday, 9 February 2018 17:12 (one week ago) Permalink

I am retired now. My answer will no doubt ruin the curve.

A is for (Aimless), Friday, 9 February 2018 19:01 (one week ago) Permalink

I contribute the max 18,500 every year and currently have $140K total. At 36 with a good twenty years to go I think I’m sitting pretty. Thank you Thrift Savings Plan. And I guess thank you Ohio for having such a low cost-of-living.

Mr. Snrub, Friday, 9 February 2018 19:20 (one week ago) Permalink

i have $1000 saved dollars and i am so fucked forever.

ian, Friday, 9 February 2018 19:35 (one week ago) Permalink

Oh, I almost forgot: the house must never need a new roof or major repairs!

A is for (Aimless), Saturday, 10 February 2018 18:58 (one week ago) Permalink

Also in the US there is a maximum earnings that you have to pay into social security on, that is now about a little over $100k -- so someone earning $250k, is only paying into the national retirement fund on less than half of their earned income. Is this the same in other places, or do you pay the same % no matter how much you make?

sarahell, Saturday, 10 February 2018 19:28 (one week ago) Permalink

If you retire with no savings in the USA, then the minimum Social Security combined with Medicare are just adequate to let you starve slowly in a cold house for many years, provided you own the house, can care for yourself, and live within walking distance of groceries and some basic services. Hurray for the USA!

― A is for (Aimless)

hahahaha don't be ridiculous aimless i knew by the age of 20 that social security was going to be bankrupt by my "retirement" age that and i'm never going to see a dime of the money i put into social security

ziggy the ginhead (rushomancy), Saturday, 10 February 2018 19:30 (one week ago) Permalink

so, are you 25 now?

sarahell, Saturday, 10 February 2018 19:40 (one week ago) Permalink

i started saving and investing in index funds pretty aggressively at 19 (right before dot.com bubble) after watching my parents struggle with money my entire life. so right now, on paper, things are looking ok for me. i have absolutely no faith that this will be the case 5, 10, 20 years from now. i suspect there's going to be some kind paradigm shifting global convulsion and all this 'being responsible' bullshit will have been for naught.

constitutional crises they fly at u face (will), Saturday, 10 February 2018 19:51 (one week ago) Permalink

If that’s the case though there’ll be entirely different problems tho, is what I reassure myself with

direct to consumer online mattress brand (silby), Saturday, 10 February 2018 19:59 (one week ago) Permalink

I have concluded it’s much riskier to take on a house’s worth of debt and hope that my particular house outperforms the S&P 500 over the next 40 years than it is to rent forever and be able to move if my means ever change.

You know you can sell the house though, right? And it's not like a car that automatically loses value? ... I feel like I have less potential mobility as a renter than if I owned a house, but that's largely because everything is super expensive, and I've been in the same place for 20 years and have rent control.

sarahell, Saturday, 10 February 2018 20:04 (one week ago) Permalink

houses are kind of a weird one because, as an investment, you're banking on the idea that appreciation will be higher than the combination of (upkeep + taxes + the difference between mortgage payment and rent payment)

if you buy a new or recently completely remodeled house you're paying for a lot of the upkeep up front, but I'm not that wise

mh, Saturday, 10 February 2018 20:14 (one week ago) Permalink

feel like rent vs. buy decisions are hugely influenced by where you live. i’m not too worried about the value of my house where i live but i can see it in other parts of the country.

call all destroyer, Saturday, 10 February 2018 20:16 (one week ago) Permalink

Anything I have to take care of myself is not a good investment. It’s all I can do to keep myself up and running.

Jeff, Saturday, 10 February 2018 20:17 (one week ago) Permalink

on the other hand, if you're not committed to it being an investment, you can do whatever the hell you want

I talked to a dude who bought a house on the cheap because the previous owner decided, fuck it, I don't need a living room -- I need a hot tub!
the house had a hot tub right in the middle of the living room, and there was some humidity damage and the room reeked like cigar smoke, because the previous dude literally just sat around in the hot tub smoking cigars when he was at home

there's some life lesson in here somewhere

mh, Saturday, 10 February 2018 20:18 (one week ago) Permalink

xp - having to maintain property (building, equipment, plants, livestock) teaches you valuable skills imo - I feel marginally better about my chances of surviving an economic collapse because I have basic carpentry skills and understand properties of adhesives

sarahell, Saturday, 10 February 2018 20:21 (one week ago) Permalink

xpost -- the previous dude was Rush Limbaugh?

Ned Raggett, Saturday, 10 February 2018 20:24 (one week ago) Permalink

The purely economic comparison between paying down a mortgage or renting is net cost of occupancy, and a dwelling's appreciation (or depreciation) only matters insofar as it figures into that cost. But a house isn't an investment, it's a place to live, too.

No two places to live are precisely equal in the quality of life they offer you, so you also have to factor in a lot of non-monetary imponderables when comparing them as a Prospective Place to Live Your Life. You try to figure out the best value in terms of net happiness, both short term and long term. Net cost of occupancy may be a big part of that equation, especially the poorer you are, but isn't ever the whole equation.

A is for (Aimless), Saturday, 10 February 2018 20:48 (one week ago) Permalink

Also in the US there is a maximum earnings that you have to pay into social security on, that is now about a little over $100k -- so someone earning $250k, is only paying into the national retirement fund on less than half of their earned income. Is this the same in other places, or do you pay the same % no matter how much you make?

― sarahell, Sunday, 11 February 2018 6:28 AM (one hour ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

This is similar in the UK, national insurance drops down to1% at some ridiculously low salary, £45k I want to say. NI is effectivenely just a tax, though and pensions are funded from general taxation rather than a specific government fund.

In Aus there is the age pension for low income people who never built up much of a super balance and that’s funded from taxation as well.

American Fear of Pranksterism (Ed), Saturday, 10 February 2018 20:53 (one week ago) Permalink

Anything I have to take care of myself is not a good investment. It’s all I can do to keep myself up and running.

lol otm

mookieproof, Saturday, 10 February 2018 21:11 (one week ago) Permalink

Why do I get the feeling that the "difference between mortgage and rent payment" equation above presumes that the rent is a lower figure

Alderweireld Horses (darraghmac), Saturday, 10 February 2018 21:23 (one week ago) Permalink

hey it was in a list, if a mortgage is cheaper it offsets some of the other pieces

mh, Saturday, 10 February 2018 21:25 (one week ago) Permalink

my mom's mortgage is less than half my rent

mookieproof, Saturday, 10 February 2018 21:47 (one week ago) Permalink

my mortgage payment (mortgage + escrow for rent/insurance) is cheaper than my friend's rent downtown in.. Des Moines, Iowa

they have a pool, though

mh, Saturday, 10 February 2018 21:56 (one week ago) Permalink

My brother was going to rent when he went back to school recently but then he just went ahead and bought a house instead because it was cheaper than renting.

(NB, he has already owned and sold a house and understands like financial stuff or whatever and makes good money and is an adult.)

Nonsense Ape Debones His Foot (Old Lunch), Saturday, 10 February 2018 23:21 (one week ago) Permalink

Living in SF, believe you me, I know what the cheaper option is. (And I'm very, very lucky to have it.)

Ned Raggett, Saturday, 10 February 2018 23:34 (one week ago) Permalink

Yeah but the phrase "cheaper option" when it comes to living in SF, is like the phrase "safer option" when given a choice between shooting yourself in the head or having someone else shoot you in the head.

sarahell, Sunday, 11 February 2018 01:44 (one week ago) Permalink

feel like rent vs. buy decisions are hugely influenced by where you live. i’m not too worried about the value of my house where i live but i can see it in other parts of the country.

― call all destroyer

my wife's grandparents bought a nice house on a river bank in west virginia after the war. when they died there they didn't have a backyard, it was all river.

on the other hand after living in indiana for a decade without buying, we bought a house within the first year of moving to portland. making a commitment to living in indiana wasn't something either of us wanted to do, and building equity was less important to us than the ability to get the hell out when the time came. also, every single goddamn west coast city is going the way of sf, and we figured we needed to buy while we could.

here's a good guideline about buying a house: if it's worth buying, you probably can't afford it.

ziggy the ginhead (rushomancy), Sunday, 11 February 2018 12:26 (one week ago) Permalink

I'll buy a house when I feel like it but I get sick of the smug attitudes of how i'm throwing money away. my parents had my childhood house for 31 years, and as a reward for their great investment....they got upside down, foreclosed and have filed for bankruptcy twice in a decade.

Obv context matters but to me doesn't seem like a slam dunk investment (at least not here). also I would probably burn the place down trying to make my first repair. my father's son I am not in that regard.

Hi diddley dee, hen fapper's life for me (Neanderthal), Sunday, 11 February 2018 14:06 (one week ago) Permalink

Social security is fine and is not on the verge of collapsing and sucking all our salary deductions into a babyboomer-shaped black hole by the time we're 35, btw. At least not unless the government steals all the money out of it, which is a political decision, not some kind of inevitable truth of financial instruments.

Conic section rebellion 44 (in orbit), Sunday, 11 February 2018 14:36 (one week ago) Permalink

buying a house for us was a great investment tradeoff for the money it took out of my 401k. It's more the doubled in value in the past 7 years and it's never, I don't think, going to go down below what we owe on it. I mean maybe it could, but there would have to be like, a nuclear strike on the bay area, I think, to really shift housing prices that much here.

akm, Sunday, 11 February 2018 15:51 (one week ago) Permalink

on the other hand after living in indiana for a decade without buying, we bought a house within the first year of moving to portland. making a commitment to living in indiana wasn't something either of us wanted to do,

you know that if you own a house, you don't have to live in it, you can rent it out? That's the one aspect of "mobility" that is often overlooked in the own vs. rent comparison. In expensive areas, it's often more expensive for a tenant to move than a homeowner to move and keep their house as a rental property.

sarahell, Sunday, 11 February 2018 19:11 (one week ago) Permalink

One expense of becoming a landlord is the extra work involved in managing a rental property. If you farm most of it out to a management company, then you have to pay them for that and even then it isn't work-free for the owner. And if the house sits vacant for a time, it still generates costs with no income. So, there's that to consider.

A is for (Aimless), Sunday, 11 February 2018 19:15 (one week ago) Permalink

You still own a house in indiana

Alderweireld Horses (darraghmac), Sunday, 11 February 2018 19:21 (one week ago) Permalink

And a mortgage to an indianese bank

Alderweireld Horses (darraghmac), Sunday, 11 February 2018 19:22 (one week ago) Permalink

I would never be a landlord much less of a property further away than next door or downstairs

El Tomboto, Sunday, 11 February 2018 19:27 (one week ago) Permalink

tbh that's what property management companies are for, although that definitely puts a dent in your rent income

mh, Sunday, 11 February 2018 19:29 (one week ago) Permalink

if i ever buy a house again it will definitely have a garage or basement apt/ MIL suite of some kind.

i will, of course, live in the basement apt and rent out the house

constitutional crises they fly at u face (will), Sunday, 11 February 2018 19:30 (one week ago) Permalink

I would never be a landlord much less of a property further away than next door or downstairs

Gah, no thank you. A rented property that I could see from my window would be anxiety times ten.

Not sure which would be worse, being lessor or lessee.

If my landlord's a big company way across town, I can relax. However, if my landlord lived upstairs or next door, I'd feel watched (no matter how chill the arrangement or how friendly the handshake. Was last weekend's party too loud? Am I doing the right thing with the recycling? Can I have the band over? If so, what time do we need to turn down the amps? Can I paint everything purple? Can I nail up my extensive collection of Scandinavian death metal paraphernalia?

Contrariwise, are the tenants barbecuing an endangered species in the firepit? Are they having a party where they have satanic ritual sex while swinging from the chandeliers? Are they sawing into the floorboards to anti-vampire stakes? What was that noise in the basement just now? Did someone just say "it puts the lotion in the basket"? No matter how many times I told myself to not look into their affairs, it would be hard to just never even cast a passing glance at how they were behaving inside my investment.

I will finish what I (Ye Mad Puffin), Sunday, 11 February 2018 19:55 (one week ago) Permalink

you know that if you own a house, you don't have to live in it, you can rent it out? That's the one aspect of "mobility" that is often overlooked in the own vs. rent comparison. In expensive areas, it's often more expensive for a tenant to move than a homeowner to move and keep their house as a rental property.

― sarahell

oh god, yeah, so i could deal with my tenants not making their payments on time and then saying "oh by the way i need my sink replaced, i dropped a toothbrush in it and it broke", fuck you you didn't drop a toothbrush in it you had a drunken party and somebody SAT ON my fucking sink and it collapsed and now i have to spend six months' rent to replace it, no thank you

ziggy the ginhead (rushomancy), Sunday, 11 February 2018 20:02 (one week ago) Permalink

anywhere that it's attractive to buy a house, you have no idea what that place will look like in 30 years because climate change

, Sunday, 11 February 2018 22:47 (one week ago) Permalink

anywhere that it's attractive to buy a house, you have no idea what that place will look like in 30 years because climate change

― 龜

having said that most models that don't involve total human extinction have portland coming out fairly well.

ziggy the ginhead (rushomancy), Sunday, 11 February 2018 23:33 (one week ago) Permalink

Until the cascadia fault slips

𝔠𝔞𝔢𝔨 (caek), Monday, 12 February 2018 00:31 (one week ago) Permalink

the one that's on a presumed 400 to 600 year recurrence cycle and had its last recurrence 300 years ago? compared to new madrid i'm not terribly concerned

ziggy the ginhead (rushomancy), Monday, 12 February 2018 00:41 (one week ago) Permalink

hey can we predict nuclear annihilation too & really make this thread a party

jeez guys

Squeaky Fromage (VegemiteGrrl), Monday, 12 February 2018 00:44 (one week ago) Permalink

Tbh I think climate change is good news for my retirement planning considering it makes it more likely I’ll die prematurely

direct to consumer online mattress brand (silby), Monday, 12 February 2018 00:46 (one week ago) Permalink

Lots of unlikely people will suddenly have oceanfront property,

Looking forward to living in the beach, if only for a while

I'm walking on Sondheim (Ye Mad Puffin), Monday, 12 February 2018 02:07 (one week ago) Permalink

Lots of unlikely people will suddenly have oceanfront property,

Looking forward to living in the beach, if only for a while

― I'm walking on Sondheim (Ye Mad Puffin), Sunday, February 11, 2018 6:07 PM (yesterday)

I looked at maps a while back, and if I stay in my current place ... total beach!

sarahell, Monday, 12 February 2018 18:55 (one week ago) Permalink

Some advice: don't look too closely at what's floating in the water.

A is for (Aimless), Monday, 12 February 2018 18:56 (one week ago) Permalink

Based on the smell of what is currently a lake, this is already my standard practice.

sarahell, Monday, 12 February 2018 18:57 (one week ago) Permalink

Fortunate to be about the last age group at my company with a guaranteed pension. Subsequent union contracts have eliminated the company-provided pension, while promoting personal responsibility for retirement. Didn't start my IRA until early 30s, against much advice, so am behind the curve to some of my peers, but still ahead of the national curve, I think.

Knock on wood, between personal savings, pension, retirement account w/ company match, and possibly Social Security, I should have enough to keep a SINK with a modest lifestyle set. Health is the big question mark.

the body of a spider... (scampering alpaca), Monday, 12 February 2018 20:19 (one week ago) Permalink

certainly moving will make you re-evaluate how much vinyl you want to own

remember, even if you have a pension they can evaporate! Nothing is certain. Especially if the pension is not well funded

I hope to retire selling my valuable CD collection

Dean of the University (Latham Green), Tuesday, 13 February 2018 20:51 (one week ago) Permalink


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