S & D: Iranian film

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I just saw Baran and thought it was amazing. Other's I have seen include: A Taste of Cherry, The Color of Paradise, The Wind Will Carry Us, Djomeh, and Gabbeh. They've all been great. What esle is there?

A Nairn (moretap), Monday, 4 November 2002 02:52 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Thread kind of begins and ends with Abbas Kiarostami, dunnit?

JM, Monday, 4 November 2002 03:26 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

More to a point, I wasn't impressed with Cherry, and it seems to me this falls under the heading of critics thinking '...it's much more important that the film be done by an underrepresented culture than if the film is shit or not.'

JM, Monday, 4 November 2002 03:27 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

WIth Baran, the story, characters and cinematography were great without it even mattering that the movie came from an underrepresented culture.

A Nairn (moretap), Monday, 4 November 2002 04:23 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

has anyone seen Pari? I'm not completely sure of the title, but it's supposedly an adaptation of Franny and Zooey. I'd really love to see that.

Justyn Dillingham (Justyn Dillingham), Monday, 4 November 2002 04:55 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

With Baran, the story, characters and cinematography were great without it even mattering that the movie came from an underrepresented culture

Pete to thread!

Martin Skidmore (Martin Skidmore), Monday, 4 November 2002 12:36 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Hmm - yes I am aware of Baran and its obvious appear to make me like it. Iranian films I have loved The Apple, Blackboards, The White Balloon, Ten. There are a few I haven't cared for though that bored me. Its a difficult line to tread - they are needfully often allagorical or abstruse in their dealings of political subjects which often make them appear more sophisticated than they otherwise would be if they could come out straight and talk about - say - the role of women in Irainian society - or the treatment of the Kurdish minority.

I think the position of non-Western cinema even reaching Western audiences is one bundled up with so many contradictions (Iranian films are now - due to their success getting a fair amnount of co-production money which then feeds the industry). But if you think of the films released in the UK last year, the fifth largest exporter of titles was Iran. This is being concentrated around four or five directors - one cannot help but wonder if their are othe rnational cinemas who could also blossom with this kind of critical interest.

Not to do down the quality of any of the Iranian films I've liked.

Pete (Pete), Monday, 4 November 2002 12:48 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

I don't know their names, but I've loved all the Iranian films I've seen, except one about mine clearance, which was dead boring apart from the sequences of burned out tanks. My favourite one is the one about a little girl on a bus. Little kids are the key to the overall appeal of Iranian films, where else do they make films about little kids nowadays? These films are also solely responsible for me *liking* Iran, so well done to all Iranian filmmakers.

PJ Miller (PJ Miller), Monday, 4 November 2002 19:33 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Kiarostami!

david h (david h), Monday, 4 November 2002 19:36 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

C4 showed an iranian film abt a little girl and her search for a goldfish. it was really nice.

Julio Desouza (jdesouza), Monday, 4 November 2002 19:39 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

That's exactly the kind of thing I'm talking about, Julio.
Has anyone read this book?
http://images-eu.amazon.com/images/P/1860648045.02.LZZZZZZZ.jpg
Doesn't the little girl look sad? Don't worry, love, it might never happen.

PJ Miller (PJ Miller), Tuesday, 5 November 2002 18:49 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

PJ that's the girl from the movie! is it a good book?

Julio Desouza (jdesouza), Tuesday, 5 November 2002 22:31 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

I admire Kiarostami, but I'll be damned if I can watch a single of one his movies without my attention wandering for long periods of time. Maybe it's my own fault.

I also have a suspicion that his movies are so slow because he may have nothing to say. But Close-Up = total masterpiece.

ryan, Wednesday, 6 November 2002 03:26 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

In addition to the films already mentioned I would also recommend 'Bashu, The Little Stranger' a film about a boy from the Persian Gulf area who escapes from war, stows away on a truck and accidentally finds himself in another part of Iran entirely, one in which he cannot understand much of the language spoken.

Mentioned above is the amazing film 'The Apple'. It tells the real story of two sisters who've been locked up by their father for their entire life until rescued by welfare authorities and it stars the family involved.

Amarga (Amarga), Wednesday, 6 November 2002 10:31 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Julio, I haven't read it yet, but I've ordered it. There is a chapter about children in Iranian films, so I'm looking forward to that. The film is 'The White Balloon', which I'd seen, but I didn't remember it was a goldfish she was after.

PJ Miller (PJ Miller), Wednesday, 6 November 2002 18:58 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

yeah what is with iranian films & kids? almost every one i've seen has been about kids - specifically kids looking for something they've lost or trying to figure out how to obtain some kind of significant object (shoes, goldfish, textbook, etc.). what does this mean?

are kids used as subjects to go under the radar of state censorship? and why always the quest theme - i mean I know it's not unique to Iranian cinema but just seems so prevalent.

Fritz Wollner (Fritz), Wednesday, 6 November 2002 19:16 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

I think it probably is a way round the censors, but there are plenty of films without kids too, and a fair few seem hellbent on raising the shackles of conservatives, like 'The Circle', which is about some women who've just been let out of prison. I think the quest theme enables them to tackle elemental matters, a bit like folk stories à la Pinocchio, etc. Plus everyone loves films about kids. Hopefully I'll be more coherent when I've digested that book.

PJ Miller (PJ Miller), Wednesday, 6 November 2002 20:21 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

''Julio, I haven't read it yet, but I've ordered it. There is a chapter about children in Iranian films, so I'm looking forward to that. The film is 'The White Balloon', which I'd seen, but I didn't remember it was a goldfish she was after.''

the girl wants a goldfish. she haggles her mother for the money and then she loses it down the drain and she needs to get ppl to help her.

OK i saw it a long time ago and my memory isn't as good these days but that's how i remember it.

Julio Desouza (jdesouza), Thursday, 7 November 2002 11:10 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

I think she gets distraXORted by a snakecharmer or something.

PJ Miller (PJ Miller), Thursday, 7 November 2002 19:45 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

yeah, she does eventually get the money out. but yeah its one of those movies that makes you feel all warm inside (just like the article on FT abt skateboarding, in fact).

Julio Desouza (jdesouza), Thursday, 7 November 2002 21:12 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

ten months pass...
The films of Abbas Kiarostami.

David. (Cozen), Wednesday, 17 September 2003 22:11 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

eleven months pass...
what a badass

http://www.mastersofcinema.org/pics/kiarostami_28_08_04.jpg

amateur!!st, Wednesday, 1 September 2004 18:58 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

hey yo, whats crimson gold like?
i wann a see it, but it doesnt seem to be out on dvd in the uk.

ambrose (ambrose), Thursday, 2 September 2004 08:21 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

I still haven't read that book, but it is on my shelf.

PJ Miller (PJ Miller), Thursday, 2 September 2004 08:43 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

'crimson gold' is v. good, ambrose. the guy who plays the male lead is like an iranian andre the giant and the long shots of him riding on his moped are v. pretty etc. there's a great scene, couldn't quite work it out, where he delivers a pizza to a v. rich guy who invites him in and befriends him, it's not so much awkward as wtf. I liked it though.

cºzen (Cozen), Thursday, 2 September 2004 09:56 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

its too late nayway, i just ordered it off amazon. Yay for multiregion!

ambrose (ambrose), Thursday, 2 September 2004 10:39 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

"crimson gold" was amazing. the lead actor turned out to be a paranoid-schizophrenic, thus much trouble on set.

amateur!!st, Thursday, 2 September 2004 16:23 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

the scene cozen mentions is absolutely stunning.

amateur!!st, Thursday, 2 September 2004 16:23 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

agreed.

cºzen (Cozen), Thursday, 2 September 2004 16:26 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

For some reason, I can't get the scene where the camera simply observes Hussein in his dingy apartment out of my head. It was the most depressing-looking apartment I've probably ever seen in a film.

The conversation with the purse-snatcher in the second scene was pretty funny.

Eric H. (Eric H.), Thursday, 2 September 2004 16:27 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

have you seen 'the deserted station', amst?

cºzen (Cozen), Thursday, 2 September 2004 16:27 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

no, what's that?

iranian films are HUGE in paris. there were often 10 of them in theaters at once. i had a hard time following all the new releases. inevitably the euphoria of first disocovery has worn off a bit, and i've seen a few that didn't impress me at all.

amateur!!st, Thursday, 2 September 2004 16:39 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

something about the mobius-strip construction bugged me a bit, it seemed a little pat as a narrative device. but that's sort of a minor cavil. most scenes had an exciting, revelatory quality. esp. when hussein gets detained outside the party and offers his pizza to the others waiting outside, including the very young soldier.

amateur!!st, Thursday, 2 September 2004 16:40 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

'the deserted station' was released this year (?? maybe last), it's based on a short story of abbas kiarostami's and it stars (the outstanding) (the beautiful) leila hatami who takes charge of a town school while the resident mayor-teacher-mechanic helps fix her husband's car. I saw it around the time I saw 'crimson gold', I fell in love with hatami.

cºzen (Cozen), Thursday, 2 September 2004 16:43 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

The other book I read ended by saying Iranian films were starting to seek approval from international audiences and were therefore losing their bite. Judging from the last couple I've seen, he was right. And I thought he was just a moaning minnie when I read it. No doubt there are still good films, but it's no longer a near-guarantee of quality.

PJ Miller (PJ Miller), Thursday, 2 September 2004 16:45 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

International festival audiences or international mainstreamish-arthouse-hybrid audiences? There's a world of difference, I'm to understand, between say Crimson Gold and Children of Heaven.

Eric H. (Eric H.), Thursday, 2 September 2004 18:27 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

The other book I read ended by saying Iranian films were starting to seek approval from international audiences and were therefore losing their bite.

i don't think the second part of this sentence follows from the first

amateur!!st, Thursday, 2 September 2004 18:29 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

I like the notion that, at first, Iranian films were implicitly fleeing from int. audience's approval.

Eric H. (Eric H.), Thursday, 2 September 2004 18:34 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

the story of iranian art cinema's appearance and success in the west is long and complicated and involves the french.

amateur!!st, Thursday, 2 September 2004 18:36 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

involves the french

As does everything involved in film.

Eric H. (Eric H.), Thursday, 2 September 2004 18:38 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

What do people think of Close-Up? that's a wild one. Kiarostami is brilliant.

Reed Moore (diamond), Thursday, 2 September 2004 18:41 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

It's the author's argument, not mine. I didn't agree with it at first, in fact I thought he was as mad as some of you seem to think I am, but now I think he might have a point. They weren't fleeing from international approval, but their funding didn't rely on acceptance at Cannes or wherever. I've had a look for the book but I haven't got it here. The cover is black.

PJ Miller (PJ Miller), Thursday, 2 September 2004 19:10 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

eight months pass...
kiarostami though!

cozen (Cozen), Thursday, 5 May 2005 19:30 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Fave Iranian film: Mohsen Makhmalbaf's A Moment of Innocence (aka The Bread and the Vase) (c. 1996)

Dr Morbius (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 5 May 2005 19:42 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

seeing CLose-up really makes me want to see a Makhmalbaf movie.

A Nairn (moretap), Thursday, 5 May 2005 20:21 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

A Moment of Innocence is getting a R1 DVD release in June!

Eric von H. (Eric H.), Friday, 6 May 2005 04:34 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

There is a Channel 4 season starting next week, innit.

PJ Miller (PJ Miller), Friday, 6 May 2005 09:21 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

there is a lot of bollocks spoken about kiarostami.

N_RQ, Friday, 6 May 2005 09:30 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

such as?

the insert to the bfi VHS?

cozen (Cozen), Friday, 6 May 2005 13:45 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

nanni moretti?

cozen (Cozen), Friday, 6 May 2005 13:45 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Yeah, Closed Curtain was the best film of 2013. People should go check it out.

Frederik B, Monday, 21 July 2014 22:54 (four years ago) Permalink

SSSSPPPPPOOILLLEEEEERRRRRRRRRRRRRRRSSS

i do feel slightly constrained, with un film nist acting as an obvious comparison to this; it's obviously so much tighter, & more complete a metaphor. but i loved this & found it so affecting. frustrating reading the various blurbs by brody et al & knowing that the arrival of the third character is announced in advance; it was a real moment, for me, much as what happens in the mirror felt like a fresh, unexpected way of making films. has been awhile since i saw this, but i could still draw a blueprint of the layout of his house. so much to like about it, the smaller roles, the woman bringing food, & obviously the dog.

schlump, Monday, 21 July 2014 23:03 (four years ago) Permalink

Hopefully this will be in London soon.

xyzzzz__, Tuesday, 22 July 2014 09:49 (four years ago) Permalink

wow. i love that trailer. looks great.

cajunsunday, Tuesday, 22 July 2014 10:15 (four years ago) Permalink

felt a wee bit of old-fashioned dog awwwwws going in this, at least if Asta in The Thin Man was watching TV footage of slaughtered dogs.

son of a lewd monk (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 22 July 2014 13:54 (four years ago) Permalink

five months pass...

http://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/museums/iranian-film-festival-at-freer-gallery/2014/12/31/b526295e-8f72-11e4-a900-9960214d4cd7_story.html

Mokri said that at first it was difficult to get “Fish & Cat” screened in Iran, in part because authorities had interpreted the mention of the year 1998, the movie’s reference to the restaurant scandal, as an allusion to a period of political killings in Iran. But after Hassan Rouhani (who has been described as a relative moderate) became president in 2013, “we had no problems, and we screened the film,” Mokri said.

Censorship was and is “very strong in Iran, both in terms of what you can make and what you can see,” Vick said. But more recently, he added, “because everybody can sneak around the rules and see things online or on satellite dishes,” Iranian directors have been able to enter more fully into dialogue with world cinema.

curmudgeon, Friday, 2 January 2015 18:36 (three years ago) Permalink

the iranian festival that's happening somewhere soon - at the mfa, maybe? - looks really great. still dying to see fish & cat.

tender is the late-night daypart (schlump), Friday, 2 January 2015 18:47 (three years ago) Permalink

The Washington D.C. showings at the Freer Gallery: Mokri is scheduled to appear at the Jan. 16 screening of “Fish & Cat,” which also airs Jan. 18.) Another festival highlight: “Manuscripts Don’t Burn,” by director Mohammad Rasoulof, who shot the thriller in 2013 despite being banned by Iranian authorities from filmmaking for 20 years.

http://www.asia.si.edu/events/films.asp

curmudgeon, Friday, 2 January 2015 19:56 (three years ago) Permalink

http://www.mfa.org/programs/series/boston-festival-films-iran-0

Boston fest and DC one are showing some of the same films

curmudgeon, Friday, 2 January 2015 19:58 (three years ago) Permalink

seven months pass...

Surprise: Taxi is yet another masterpiece from Jafar Panahi, who at this point doesn't really make anything less than that. A bit bewildering since there is a multitude of characters and voices, and a lot of them are reflections of characters in Panahi's earlier films, and I'm still not entirely sure of what some of it means. But it's so inventive, funny and humanistic.

Frederik B, Wednesday, 19 August 2015 10:11 (three years ago) Permalink

so hyped

tender is the late-night daypart (schlump), Wednesday, 19 August 2015 11:03 (three years ago) Permalink

yup!

xyzzzz__, Thursday, 20 August 2015 10:05 (three years ago) Permalink

Hey, trailer!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eM2tblIkL4g

I love this film. Especially the warmth between Panahi and his niece. Who was also the one who received the Bear in february:
http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2015/02/14/25AEAC4300000578-0-image-a-57_1423946700438.jpg

Frederik B, Thursday, 20 August 2015 20:09 (three years ago) Permalink

I don't know where to post this - perhaps we need a 'best scenes at the moment'-thread - so I'm posting this here. Found this clip from A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night, so far and away the best scene in the film, and one of the best scenes of the year imo (It's a 2015 release in Denmark).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WuN4wcDGlIc

(and I don't even like thinking of it as strictly an 'Iranian' film. It IS Iranian, of course, in it's own way, but also American, and also exile-Iranian)

Frederik B, Tuesday, 1 September 2015 10:57 (three years ago) Permalink

two months pass...

im a fan of panahi's earlier work, but didnt quite see the worth in taxi (or this is not a film either), beyond their very creation, and the lengths he had to go through to make them, which of course makes them an achievement of some merit, but im not sure the actual content measures up to their surreptitious conception. it took me a while to get past the fact he is basically just remaking ten, and really as memorably. all the old tropes of panahi's and his peers' old films are there (cutesey kids, bluring of docu realism and fiction, a drawing attention to the nature of film making itself), which i suppose is forgiveable, he is allowed to revisit himself, but it was all done without much in the way of surprise. there was also something weirdly smug and self regarding about the whole feel of the film as well, which got trying after a while. it touches on lots of interesting topics/themes, probably most memorably the idea of unscreenable films, which again is not a new theme for anyone familiar with iranian movies/directors, but this at least was explored more than the other characters, whose stories didnt really seem to add up to much, and were just minor glimpses that we are expected to read into more than they actually allow us to. in terms of that generation of iranian directors, makhmalbaf's the president was more impressive (though oddly got worse reviews). and if you want a real sequel/reprisal of ten, mania akbari's 10+4 was also better.

StillAdvance, Monday, 16 November 2015 10:24 (two years ago) Permalink

*really not as memorably

StillAdvance, Monday, 16 November 2015 10:24 (two years ago) Permalink

I really don't want to do this but..

Panahi's niece had a very meaty part. She wasn't cute but by turns manipulative and argumentative. Funny but no more than the adults. Panahi used their interactions to make points about making film as a practice. It was the opposite of 'cutesy' when he trotted out two nattering old ladies for The White Baloon re-creation.

You talk about the idea of unscreenable films as some abstract notion that he must 'make new' and refresh and innovate. But the reason these are rough-ish is precisely because these idiotic set of rules have been used to stop Panahi from making films the way he wants to. The stories didn't 'add up to much' because maybe they would need a wider scenario that couldn't be shot? But actually I found most of it quite coherent. Was it 'smug and self-regarding' to have the lawyer come in and talk about how her practice and work are being stopped by the Iranian government? The rose to the camera was applying a sentiment of solidarity in a similar way to Makhmalbaf's A Moment of Innocence".

This was better than The President (although the ending almost made-up for the slluggish story) and liked it more than Ten although I need to re-watch that.

xyzzzz__, Monday, 16 November 2015 10:52 (two years ago) Permalink

i said her part was given the most room for exploration (though argumentative and manipulative kids in iranian films is not a new thing), compared to the others, so we agree there. obviously her section had the most resonance, which im not disputing, but even though it does still hold weight, the fact is that you didnt really learn anything new about it, or anything fresh. i know its prob churlish to criticise it in light of how it was produced, and maybe im being a bit mean spirited, but for a director who comes from a generation of filmmakers who are quite expert in getting mileage out of constraints and working around what they have to deal with, i still think there was room for the film to go somewhere else, or to do more, say a bit more.

StillAdvance, Monday, 16 November 2015 11:05 (two years ago) Permalink

I really disagree with pretty much everything you are saying, not least because even most of the audience who have seen more than half a dozen Iranian films wouldn't really know then ins-and-outs of unscreenable films or the rules Panahi is meant to have broken beyond talking about things that he shouldn't have in his films. Your bigger mistake is in the notion of the way films break ground. Because I think these are doing just that at a very micro-level, in tiny steps, and in a way Panahi would never have gotten to if this ban wasn't imposed on him.

Think this trilogy of films as such really covers new ground in terms of constraint - its quite an act to flip these constraints around in the way he has and in the end actually re-boot the old-ish dynamic of totalitarian regime against the lone artist (Panahi has become a really great actor through these, although again its all playing with the notion of what is and isn't acted or planned).

I really can't recall such a grown-up conversation between a main actor and a child in most films so I don't think we agree where you think we agree.

xyzzzz__, Monday, 16 November 2015 11:48 (two years ago) Permalink

The full story - how Panahi has managed to make two films post This is not a Film hasn't quite been told (or I haven't heard it) but that's for another time.

xyzzzz__, Monday, 16 November 2015 11:49 (two years ago) Permalink

"I really can't recall such a grown-up conversation between a main actor and a child in most films so I don't think we agree where you think we agree."

you should check out ten again then, and 10+4

StillAdvance, Monday, 16 November 2015 11:58 (two years ago) Permalink

That's two films, one of which was made over a decade ago, which Panahi clearly drew on..

xyzzzz__, Monday, 16 November 2015 12:15 (two years ago) Permalink

to be fair, i think the film is charming, amusing, playful, and all the stuff i expected it to be, which should be enough, but perhaps i just expected more.

"Your bigger mistake is in the notion of the way films break ground. Because I think these are doing just that at a very micro-level, in tiny steps, and in a way Panahi would never have gotten to if this ban wasn't imposed on him."

"Think this trilogy of films as such really covers new ground in terms of constraint - its quite an act to flip these constraints around in the way he has and in the end actually re-boot the old-ish dynamic of totalitarian regime against the lone artist"

id be interested to hear more on this.

StillAdvance, Monday, 16 November 2015 12:20 (two years ago) Permalink

not sure i would go so far as to call him a great actor, though he does do a good line in strained smiling

StillAdvance, Monday, 16 November 2015 12:28 (two years ago) Permalink

With the first quote you pulled out - its in the way you come across as wanting a film to break ground as almost a seismic shift in the way things are done. Funny because these are certainly not normal films where you can demand that kind of expectation. otoh its arguable that the specific contraints imposed on Panahi pushed him to make choices and film subjects in a way he wouldn't have done.

(There is an aside for thinking around other directors and the ways in which they dodged the censor (Tarkovsky in the Soviet Union) but it needs more thinking/fleshing out.)

Did you or did you not expect more? So is it an 'amusing, charming' film that is worthless at the same time? I'm confused. Can you think more about what you are typing before you do? I know you don't have to.

xyzzzz__, Monday, 16 November 2015 12:41 (two years ago) Permalink

"otoh its arguable that the specific contraints imposed on Panahi pushed him to make choices and film subjects in a way he wouldn't have done." this is obvious but I think the results have given some highs and very different colours and moods: Closed Curtain, which has this darkness to it, where Panahi is dabbling in a form of destruction.

Quite shocking to go from that to the comic in Taxi

xyzzzz__, Monday, 16 November 2015 12:52 (two years ago) Permalink

A bit late to the party, but some thoughts:

The switch from Closed Curtain to Taxi is indeed quite big, but it's also quite logical. In Closed Curtain Panahi not only depicts his suicidal thoughts, he also wins over them, and leave them in the seaside villa, while he himself drives off. So the next film opens with him more cheerful, in another car!

The lawyer at the end says that the regime is jailing people, not to punish those specific people, but to make all of Iran feel like a prison. Well, Panahi responds, not just by turning his Taxi into a place of free discussion, but also by turning all of Teheran into a playground through cinematography. At times the spiritual equivalent of this film is more something like Playtime. As in the scene where the niece is trying to film the wedding couple, while the beggar walks around as well, that's just marvelous choreography.

I don't think there's anything particularly seismic about these three films, Panahi is working in a typical Iranian form that he himself helped define. He talks in This Is Not a Film about The Mirror, about the moment of 'throwing off the cast'. Well, the new thing about these films is that Panahi is also, through circumstances, forced to throw down the gauntlet. Not so much in This is Not a Film, that's still an attempt to create art within the limitations. These other two films are fighting films, though. And while they're techniques are wellknown, from Panahi and Makhmalbaf and others, Panahi now uses them differently, and creates new things with them.

I consider this trilogy to be the most important thing in world cinema this decade. I quite simply love it. It's not a complete statement, it's a discussion, with himself, his filmmaking and now the rest of his country. There are things that might not be true, that Panahi later discards. But this discussion is so so important, in a world where questions of free speech, censorship and art continue to be important. And Taxi Teheran responds with the most triumphant and warm voice to all the inhibitions put in his way.

Frederik B, Tuesday, 17 November 2015 16:03 (two years ago) Permalink

And while they're techniques are wellknown, from Panahi and Makhmalbaf and others, Panahi now uses them differently, and creates new things with them.

That's it - definitely a shift. Again all through a partic set of circumstances that meant he had to use techniques there are well-known in different ways.

Is this a trilogy? Just get a sense of Panahi carrying on in whatever way he can. Closed Curtain felt like it was filmed a particularly depressing time.

xyzzzz__, Tuesday, 17 November 2015 16:30 (two years ago) Permalink

Wishful thinking... I so want the ban to be lifted so he'll only make three films this way.

Frederik B, Tuesday, 17 November 2015 16:34 (two years ago) Permalink

one month passes...

http://www.asia.si.edu/events/films.asp

20th anniversary Iranian film fest in W. DC and Maryland started last weekend and goes through spring. Old and newer films include: The Cow; The President; Taxi; Avalanche; Wolkaan; Monir; Melbourne; 316; Atomic Heart

http://www.asia.si.edu/events/films.asp

curmudgeon, Wednesday, 6 January 2016 16:48 (two years ago) Permalink

http://www.washingtoncitypaper.com/blogs/artsdesk/general/2016/01/14/exile-censorship-and-pink-floyd-a-qa-with-curator-tom-vick-on-the-iranian-film-festival/

TV: I would say that this year's batch is quite varied. Films like Avalanche and Melbourne are typical of the style many people associate with Iranian cinema, but Taxi, 316, and Atomic Heart, for instance, take more experimental approaches. The first two comment in different ways on censorship in Iran. Atomic Heart (whose title comes from an obscure Pink Floyd album) shows a side of Iranian life most Americans wouldn't be familiar with. The two films made by Iranians living abroad (Bahar Noorizadeh and Mohsen Makhmalbaf) both reflect on their makers' exile.

curmudgeon, Friday, 15 January 2016 14:50 (two years ago) Permalink

Saw Makhmalbaf's "The President" at a packed National Gallery of Art in W. DC showing Sunday (people sitting in the aisles; many DC area living Iranian families). Big 500 seat theatre too.

I thought it was very impressive. Good blend of satire and seriousness in this tale of a dictator.

curmudgeon, Tuesday, 19 January 2016 15:57 (two years ago) Permalink

You can see "The President" in Boston tonight, as part of the MFA's end of January Iranian Film Fest

http://www.mfa.org/programs/series/the-boston-festival-of-films-from-iran

curmudgeon, Thursday, 21 January 2016 17:58 (two years ago) Permalink

It's showing in Copenhagen as well this week. Think I'll go tomorrow.

Frederik B, Thursday, 21 January 2016 22:38 (two years ago) Permalink

four months pass...

The President sneaking into one New York theater today for a week

we can be heroes just for about 3.6 seconds (Dr Morbius), Friday, 3 June 2016 20:12 (two years ago) Permalink

its brilliant i think. underrated, actually.

StillAdvance, Saturday, 4 June 2016 08:06 (two years ago) Permalink

hafta say i thought it was a misfire, kinda hated the moppet (American child actors really are the best)

some good scenes of course, mostly in the last third

we can be heroes just for about 3.6 seconds (Dr Morbius), Friday, 10 June 2016 15:28 (two years ago) Permalink

I liked it. Thought the kid was kinda universal in some ways

curmudgeon, Friday, 10 June 2016 16:07 (two years ago) Permalink

one month passes...

ICA in London are doing a makhmalbaf season. 35mm prints of salaam cinema and moment of innocence (only ever seen them on dvd so hoping to make it), and digital screenings of some of his more recent stuff - i dont know much about the gardener or daddys school but they sound interesting (though as they are only about an hour long, would have been nice to have had them as a double bill).

https://www.ica.org.uk/whats-on/season/mohsen-makhmalbaf-focus

StillAdvance, Monday, 1 August 2016 10:22 (two years ago) Permalink

six months pass...

http://www.asia.si.edu/events/films.asp

Iranian Film Fest has been going on in DC area (continues to March 1). Lots of Kiarostami. Plus I saw this:

Reza Dormishian’s latest, Lantouri, is a harrowing, suspenseful effort about the relationship between a criminal rehabilitation activist and a troubled member of a cold-blooded gang of thieves who falls in love with her. Some scenes that graphically invoke the legal concept of “an eye for an eye” are gruesome, while others, employing a range of speakers, will test the viewer’s ability to read subtitles quickly. Reportedly influenced by Jean-Luc Godard and Iranian documentaries, Dormishian’s confrontational work addresses women’s and human rights and questions how far the notion of forgiveness should go

and this:

For longtime followers of Iranian cinema, brilliant actress Leila Hatami needs no introduction. Feted with awards around the world for her performances in such films as Leila and A Separation, she is one of Iran’s most recognizable and compelling performers. In Soheil Beiraghi’s debut, she plays the force-of-nature queen of Tehran’s underground, a ruthless and enigmatic fixer, staying one step ahead of the law as she forges passports, moves illicit booze, and effortlessly emasculates a musical protégé. Me (aka I) is an eye-opening depiction of Tehran’s surprisingly robust underworld. (Soheil Beiraghi, 2016, Persian and English with subtitles, 84 minutes

curmudgeon, Thursday, 23 February 2017 18:44 (one year ago) Permalink

Wonder if I should see "Taste of Cherry" Saturday? It seems to be a hate or love it effort.

curmudgeon, Thursday, 23 February 2017 18:49 (one year ago) Permalink

Only one way to find out! :) I loved it, personally, and think it's one of his best.

Great bill, this festival.

Le Bateau Ivre, Thursday, 23 February 2017 18:58 (one year ago) Permalink

Taste of Cherry is awesome

pointless rock guitar (Michael B), Thursday, 23 February 2017 19:03 (one year ago) Permalink

seven months pass...

The Saless retro looks like a must

xyzzzz__, Friday, 20 October 2017 13:46 (one year ago) Permalink

Don't know him at all, and neither does anyone in my Letterboxd feed except Jonathan Rosenbaum. So retro here should follow.

ice cream social justice (Dr Morbius), Friday, 20 October 2017 14:09 (one year ago) Permalink

Still Life was incredible, given a one-off broadcast on TV here many years ago.

Don't know anything else so it'll be a discovery.

xyzzzz__, Friday, 20 October 2017 14:40 (one year ago) Permalink

three months pass...

https://www.freersackler.si.edu/events/films/#/?i=2

Annual Iranian Film Festival going on in DC for free. I saw Oscar nominated Film “Breath.” A sad touching effort about a young girl and her family in late 1970s end of Shah era Iran.

curmudgeon, Saturday, 27 January 2018 16:15 (eight months ago) Permalink

Kiarostami's final film "24 Frames" , made in the last 3 years before his death in 2016, is, uh, something. He took a photo of a Pieter Bruegel the Elder's 1565 painting The Hunters in the Snow and 23 of his own photos (many of them of snow-covered fields, or waves crashing on the shore) and imagined what happened before and after. He via computer tools added 4 minutes or so of action to each of the 24 shots. Some are wearying and repetitious with little happening, but others are special.

curmudgeon, Monday, 29 January 2018 15:16 (eight months ago) Permalink

I keep missing Fest films... Maybe I can make it this weekend

curmudgeon, Friday, 9 February 2018 17:38 (eight months ago) Permalink


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