bergman season at NFT: what movies do I go to see? + C/D

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there's a bergman season. it goes up to feb 28th:

http://www.bfi.org.uk/showing/nft/bergman/calendar/index.php

I won't have time to see them all so what should I go to see (pick a few faves)?

and C/D of course.

Julio Desouza (jdesouza), Wednesday, 8 January 2003 17:21 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

is that a new print of Persona? Doesn't say in the blurb, but given it's showing every day for 2 weeks, I guess it must be. Go see that anyway.

Jeff W, Wednesday, 8 January 2003 17:33 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Well of course "Wild Strawberries" is the OPO/POO, prob'ly ("Seventh Seal" running a close second but WS = much clearer) "Port of Call" is very early so not v. "deep" but is a really enjoyable movie in lush gorgeous b&w. Tuesday 21 January on that site is a WONDERFUL double feature of "The Devil's Eye" and "The Virgin Spring": wouldn't miss that, v. mystical & great movies those two. "Winter Light" is one of my favorites but is pretty uneventful: it's about a priest losing his faith. Closing scene in it is spectacular though if you've gotten way into the priest's struggle w/faithlessness. "The Silence" is around a similar theme (the title refers to the fact that God has now been totally silent for at least 2000 years according to Xity) and is a good underrated one, nice pairing with Winter Light on 30 Jan. Lots of people really love Persona as it's slightly "experimental" but it doesn't do for me what "Cries and Whispers" does i.e. devastate me completely. Autumn Sonata & Life of the Marionettes are both great, Fanny and Alexander is v. long but incredibly beautiful, I seem to remember The Serpent's Egg striking me as quite cool & very different from normal Bergman (it was filmed in Germany), and that's about enough Bergman-worship out of me. If you only saw two nights I'd go with The Devil's Eye/Virgin Spring nite and Cries & Whispers/Sunday's Children -- even though I haven't seen Sunday's Children -- but with this strategy you get one canonical Bergman classic (Virgin Spring) one uncharacteristic & surprisingly great religious comedy (Devil's Eye) and one completely wrenching journey into pain (Cries and Whispers).

My God that's a wordy paragraph. Sorry. I heart Ingmar Berman :)

J0hn Darn13ll3 (J0hn Darn13ll3), Wednesday, 8 January 2003 17:38 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

And come to think of it I'm going to be in town one of those nights! (we're doing a Peel session somewhere around the end of Jan.) I may get to go to this wonderful festival after all instead of just being jealous of Julio hooray!

J0hn Darn13ll3 (J0hn Darn13ll3), Wednesday, 8 January 2003 17:40 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

thanks for that wonderful post john.

Julio Desouza (jdesouza), Wednesday, 8 January 2003 17:42 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Another vote for 'Persona', here, w/ 'Cries and Whispers' a v. close 2nd.

Andrew L (Andrew L), Thursday, 9 January 2003 10:43 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Well Wild Strawbs is one for an extended run so I'm going to see that some time this week.

Pete (Pete), Thursday, 9 January 2003 10:49 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

prob go to see WB tomorrow. and its the first time I'll be going to the NFT as well.

Julio Desouza (jdesouza), Thursday, 9 January 2003 11:03 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

I know this is straight out of the Gospel according to Thomson, but I MUCH prefer 60s Bergman to 50s Bergman: 'Wild Strawberries' in particular always struck me as a bit bogus/sentimental ('Virgin Spring' is gd, tho', if only 'cos it 'inspired' Last House on the Left...) I'm looking forward to Pete and Julio's reports back on WS, to see what they make of it...

Andrew L (Andrew L), Thursday, 9 January 2003 11:14 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

what abt you andrew. are you gonna watch anything?

Julio Desouza (jdesouza), Thursday, 9 January 2003 11:18 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

I really like "Summer with Monika", which rarely seems hailed as a "classic". And obviously you should see "Fanny and Alexander".

Tag, Thursday, 9 January 2003 11:24 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

I think he was just copying Woody Allen, but forgot to put in any gags.

Martin Skidmore (Martin Skidmore), Thursday, 9 January 2003 18:19 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Fanny & Alexander is a good one to see in the theater when you get a chance to.

felicity (felicity), Thursday, 9 January 2003 18:21 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

''I know this is straight out of the Gospel according to Thomson, but I MUCH prefer 60s Bergman to 50s Bergman: 'Wild Strawberries' in particular always struck me as a bit bogus/sentimental ('Virgin Spring' is gd, tho', if only 'cos it 'inspired' Last House on the Left...) I'm looking forward to Pete and Julio's reports back on WS, to see what they make of it...''

so I went to NFT and saw 'wild Strawberries'. my first Bergman movie.

I can see abt the 'sentimentality' here but I thought it was required. The doctor is v cold (brilliant career but a failed marriage) but toward the end of his life he needs his memories of his chilhood/adolescence to offer him some comfort.

Bergman sets up this situation so he can use 'sentimentality'. and he was receiving an award for his work so its only natural that he would spend that time on the journey to Lund reflecting on his life (besides the fact that when we grow old we might become nostalgic).

''I think he was just copying Woody Allen, but forgot to put in any gags.''

um, was Woody allen making films before bergman (WB is from 1957)? what was the earliest bergman? also WB is really funny. the gags are good here.

I also like the fact that he didn't explore the relationship to his son but to his son's wife.

only thing I didn't like was the way that his son and wife seemed to patch up their differences just like that. almost as if he was running out of time.

Julio Desouza (jdesouza), Saturday, 11 January 2003 14:17 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

though i'll need to see some of his other movies. i would guess the same isuues crop again and it would be interesting to see how he treats them.

Julio Desouza (jdesouza), Saturday, 11 January 2003 14:25 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

I was joking about Woody, who is a major Bergman fan and pasticheur at times. His worst films are those most like Bergman - Interiors, most obviously.

Martin Skidmore (Martin Skidmore), Saturday, 11 January 2003 15:33 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

I rented "Cries and Whispers" once, and shut it off in a record 10 minutes, or thereabouts. The tone of it just really put me off. Of course, I realize that was unfair, you can't judge a film in the first 10 minutes, and I may have just been in a bad mood. But still.

Sean (Sean), Saturday, 11 January 2003 16:17 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

well rent it and watch it again sean.

(we were given a piece of paper with bergman's thoughts on it which I i only got round to reading it today but it first has a quote from Woody Allen).

Julio Desouza (jdesouza), Saturday, 11 January 2003 20:25 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

'Interiors' is one of Woody's best films. It's when he rips of Fellini that you're really in troub.

Bergs I wld like to see: 'Hour of the Wolf', 'Shame', 'The Rite' and 'A Passion'.

Andrew L (Andrew L), Saturday, 11 January 2003 21:37 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

they are showing all of those apart from the last one (unless you mean, 'the passion of anna').

Julio Desouza (jdesouza), Saturday, 11 January 2003 22:04 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

one year passes...
Revive!

First let me be heretical: Wild Strawberries bored me wildly. However, Bermgan is still firmly entrenched as one of my favorite filmmakers on the basis of Seventh Seal, Cries & Whispers and to a slightly lesser extent Persona. So what next must I see? John's description of Silence sounds like the best candidate.

vleeetrmx21 (Leee), Tuesday, 8 June 2004 21:15 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

He boounds wildly with me. I thought Strawberries never really topped that first dream sequence, and Smiles on a Summer Night was the least funny comedy I think I've ever seen. His fat miniseries work seems to be quite awesome, though.

Eric H. (Eric H.), Wednesday, 9 June 2004 04:03 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

one year passes...
i'd never seen an ingmar bergman film till about a month ago as i'd always had the impression they were all really boring. um, i stand corrected. he's got one of the most engaging visual styles i've ever seen, very clean and simple yet filled with shots i find it hard to get out of my mind - enough so that i actually feel excited about watching movies again after like five months of feeling indifferent to them (one of the sad side-effects of taking film classes, i've found). of the three i've seen, wild strawberries is as moving a film as i've ever seen (boring? sentimental? sheesh!), persona is a masterpiece beyond reproach, and hour of the wolf is pretty goofy but still worth watching. so i'll be checking everything else out ASAP.

J.D. (Justyn Dillingham), Monday, 2 January 2006 09:51 (twelve years ago) Permalink

I think Smiles of a Summer Night is a great sex comedy (so break the tie between me and Eric).

On my Underappreciated list are The Magician and After the Rehearsal.

Dr Morbius (Dr Morbius), Monday, 2 January 2006 17:10 (twelve years ago) Permalink

two months pass...
Check out the new Criterion DVD of The Virgin Spring.

Alfred, Lord Sotosyn (Alfred Soto), Tuesday, 28 March 2006 21:37 (twelve years ago) Permalink

here is my somewhat hem hem encrypted review of "the silence" which everyone -- inc.d4rni3lle above -- seems keen to describe v.weirdly: look what it is ABOUT is it is entirely from the POV of a KID who doesn't really understand the adults round him, anyway i love it

i am a wee bit hard on glass darkly and winter light in it (innit), but the silence is MUCH more must-see i think

mark s (mark s), Tuesday, 28 March 2006 21:52 (twelve years ago) Permalink

The only way we can accept The Silence is thru the child's point of view. Bitchy lesbian incest and dwarves sounds like proto-David Lynch, no?

Alfred, Lord Sotosyn (Alfred Soto), Tuesday, 28 March 2006 22:07 (twelve years ago) Permalink

I heart The Silence too. Much more successful at showing what Bergman characters sometimes seem to be only talking about in his other films. Also one of the best uses ever of the usually tired trope of "teh little people." I am a little afraid to click on link and have sinkah's incisive thoughts drive out my fuzzy ones, but here I go.

(xpost)

The Day The World Turned Dayglo Redd (Ken L), Tuesday, 28 March 2006 22:10 (twelve years ago) Permalink

haha NOT THAT INCISIVE i don't think -- more like distractedly scribbled

mark s (mark s), Tuesday, 28 March 2006 22:15 (twelve years ago) Permalink

I haven't seen Winter Light in many years but it struck me as too arid.

My favorite: Shame, which took the austerity of his chamber dramas in a bold and frightening direction. It's probably the most convincing depiction of a postwar environment on film.

Alfred, Lord Sotosyn (Alfred Soto), Tuesday, 28 March 2006 22:18 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Hour Of The Wolf has kind of a bad reputation, but there is a kind of campiness and conventional ghost story aspect to it that in some ways make it more enjoyable than some of the others with loftier reputations.

The Day The World Turned Dayglo Redd (Ken L), Tuesday, 28 March 2006 22:29 (twelve years ago) Permalink

proto-David Lynch

not to forget the constant (air conditioner?) humming in the background (which, in retrospect, might have been the bad print i saw)

Yawn (Wintermute), Tuesday, 28 March 2006 22:30 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Really? I thought it was really hot in that Behind-The-Iron-Curtain hotel, and that there was no A/C.

The Day The World Turned Dayglo Redd (Ken L), Tuesday, 28 March 2006 22:38 (twelve years ago) Permalink

it is more Behind-the-Eric-Ambler-Curtain, i think (ie not really a geographical-historical place so much as an menacing idea of a politics)

eraserhead meets touch of evil meets eloise

mark s (mark s), Tuesday, 28 March 2006 22:50 (twelve years ago) Permalink

"in sweden, everything is fi-ine"

http://ludovicmaubreuil.hautetfort.com/images/medium_eraserhead.jpg

mark s (mark s), Tuesday, 28 March 2006 22:52 (twelve years ago) Permalink

it is more Behind-the-Eric-Ambler-Curtain
Indeed. The eldest son of that hotel waiter was soon to grow up to be a Mastermind pretender.

The Day The World Turned Dayglo Redd (Ken L), Wednesday, 29 March 2006 11:47 (twelve years ago) Permalink

I just re-saw the early '60s trilogy and Through a Glass Darkly and Harriet Andersson still rule.

Dr Morbius (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 29 March 2006 13:20 (twelve years ago) Permalink

The Passion of Anna – worth renting? Quick!

Alfred, Lord Sotosyn (Alfred Soto), Friday, 31 March 2006 18:21 (twelve years ago) Permalink

yes

Dr Morbius (Dr Morbius), Friday, 31 March 2006 19:07 (twelve years ago) Permalink

three years pass...

ullman series at BAM, which should i go see

Shame
Persona
Hour of the Wolf
Scenes from a Marriage
Saraband
Faithless (Trolösa)
The Passion of Anna (En passion)
Cries and Whispers (Viskningar och rop)
The Serpent’s Egg
Autumn Sonata (Höstsonaten)

max, Wednesday, 18 November 2009 22:32 (nine years ago) Permalink

see persona, it's one of the 4-5 best movies ever. then probably cries and whispers. i haven't seen a bad one yet.

(The Other) J.D. (J.D.), Thursday, 19 November 2009 00:26 (nine years ago) Permalink

Shame Shame Shame

Chris L, Thursday, 19 November 2009 01:43 (nine years ago) Permalink

Persona's great, but seems to screen fairly often in NY. I'd vote for *Cries & Whispers* or *Scenes,* esp. if you're up for some uncomfortable intensity. (The former made me gasp out loud at home). Skip *Saraband* (unless you've already scene *Scenes*--it's a sequel) and Faithless (Ullman directed, from a Bergman script).

uninspired girls rejoice!!! (Hoot Smalley), Thursday, 19 November 2009 02:15 (nine years ago) Permalink

eleven months pass...

Sat down tonight intending to watch Wild Strawberries, but looked at this thread and decided to go with Persona instead.

thankig u, ilx

Unfrozen Caveman Board-Lawyer (WmC), Wednesday, 17 November 2010 04:24 (eight years ago) Permalink

six years pass...

it is more Behind-the-Eric-Ambler-Curtain, i think (ie not really a geographical-historical place so much as an menacing idea of a politics) eraserhead meets touch of evil meets eloise

Love this. Wish the link to sinkah's full FT review hadn't gone missing.

Under Heaviside Manners (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 15 July 2017 13:54 (one year ago) Permalink

fwiw

mark s, Saturday, 15 July 2017 14:01 (one year ago) Permalink

Thanks!

Under Heaviside Manners (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 15 July 2017 18:31 (one year ago) Permalink

Bonus points for Old Skool Halliwell quote.

Under Heaviside Manners (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 15 July 2017 18:44 (one year ago) Permalink

Shame holds up so well.

the Rain Man of nationalism. (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 15 July 2017 18:55 (one year ago) Permalink

cries & whispers, wild strawberries and persona are all on MUBI right now, none of which i've seen: which should i watch?

(none of them tonight: ferrera's king of new york feat.cwalken leaves at midnight and i haven't seen it since it came out)

mark s, Saturday, 15 July 2017 19:10 (one year ago) Permalink

All of them, with caveats

the Rain Man of nationalism. (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 15 July 2017 19:12 (one year ago) Permalink

I'd go with Wild Strawberries, though its been ages since I've seen the other two.

some sad trombone Twilight Zone shit (cryptosicko), Saturday, 15 July 2017 19:15 (one year ago) Permalink

Persona

Bernie Lugg (Ward Fowler), Saturday, 15 July 2017 19:29 (one year ago) Permalink

I watched king of New York for the first time today and understood for the first time why my gay mum fancies Christopher Walken

Cueing up wild strawberries now, which I've also never seen

blog haus aka the scene raver (wins), Saturday, 15 July 2017 19:31 (one year ago) Permalink

xpost

but yes, Shame is amazing

Bernie Lugg (Ward Fowler), Saturday, 15 July 2017 19:32 (one year ago) Permalink

you should def watch all of them

(The Other) J.D. (J.D.), Saturday, 15 July 2017 20:07 (one year ago) Permalink

cries & whispers, wild strawberries and persona are all on MUBI right now, none of which i've seen: which should i watch?

(none of them tonight: ferrera's king of new york feat.cwalken leaves at midnight and i haven't seen it since it came out)


You must be talking about Mubi UK

Under Heaviside Manners (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 15 July 2017 20:10 (one year ago) Permalink

i am yes

mark s, Saturday, 15 July 2017 20:14 (one year ago) Permalink

sorry

mark s, Saturday, 15 July 2017 20:14 (one year ago) Permalink

Watch all of them, yes - my favourite is Cries & Whispers (its just my fave Bergman full stop)

Through a Glass Darkly also on MUBI so I'll try and watch that.

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 15 July 2017 21:54 (one year ago) Permalink

yep i have TaGD on ancient crappy video

mark s, Saturday, 15 July 2017 22:04 (one year ago) Permalink

i missed wild strawberries thru bein dumm

watching the 3-hr fanny & alexander now: so great

ewa fröling just screaming at her husband's death right now

mark s, Saturday, 22 July 2017 20:35 (one year ago) Permalink

and then the funeral, and we're thrown back into something half victorian, half-medieval

mark s, Saturday, 22 July 2017 20:36 (one year ago) Permalink

gunn wållgren as the grandmother is terrific: she was more or less the matriarch of swedish film at this point also, and died only a year after the film came out

mark s, Saturday, 22 July 2017 21:08 (one year ago) Permalink

Through a Glass Darkly was excellent though I'm still digesting it. Take him for granted, need to re-watch some more.

xyzzzz__, Monday, 24 July 2017 17:27 (one year ago) Permalink

What an amazing streak between at least 1953 and 1982. It would be far more difficult to determine what's not worth seeing… but fwiw Bergman himself considered the comedy All These Women aka Now About These Women a relative failure. My least favorite in that period would be The Touch, the English-language one with Elliott Gould.

Josefa, Monday, 24 July 2017 17:53 (one year ago) Permalink

five months pass...

15 years on and we have another. Its not called the NFT anymore.

Saw Winter Light yesterday (the only one of the so-called Trilogy of Silence I hadn't seen). So so much to say - for a start Nykvist's cinematography was just something else (I mean I knew that but to encounter it on the big screen for the first time in well, 15 years, as oposed to seeing it on TV screens). Could spend a long-time just looking at those shots. Then Bergman's writing is so good - just no fat whatsoever, the editing infuses it with mystifications, the in-built subtle play with causation as the day unfolds. Then there's the acting, which is so good - although you also fear it came at a cost to all concerned. To think there was another 30 years of this, when it was all so THERE.

Ones I am going to see: The Passion of Anna, Autumn Sonata and possibly All These Women (the last one is a comedy).

xyzzzz__, Tuesday, 2 January 2018 22:16 (eleven months ago) Permalink

This time around its spread over three months as oposed to two and the BFI are organising it in these strands - so if you want to see his films on love, well you know where to go for the heartbreak.

xyzzzz__, Tuesday, 2 January 2018 22:20 (eleven months ago) Permalink

one month passes...

Went to a three hour screening of the complete TV version of Face to Face and what is it? So much of a culmniation of everything up to that moment with a look forward to the rest of it - the failure of talk to cure the ills (Persona), those inventive and yet tough dream sequences (Wild Strawberries), the aborted at birth relationships (The Passion of Anna), his obsession with the tick-tock of time and the games with death. Shades of Amour with Jenny's grandparents (sans sadism) (and Ullmann for Huppert). Its the kind of thing that makes me want to re-watch a dozen Bergman features and take note of what he is doing just here. It felt inexaustible.

And to top it off the couple behind me were divided on it - one seemed to like it, the other hated it. That's always funny to me.

xyzzzz__, Sunday, 25 February 2018 20:48 (nine months ago) Permalink

In Bergman's book Images, he reveals he thinks he utterly failed with F to F, esp re dreams/reality compared to Wild Strawberries.

ice cream social justice (Dr Morbius), Sunday, 25 February 2018 21:22 (nine months ago) Permalink

IB:

Dino di Laurentiis was delighted with the film, which received rave reviews in America. Perhaps it did present something new that had never been tried before. Now when I see Face to Face, I remember an old farce with Bob Hope, Bing Crosby, and Dorothy Lamour. It's called The Road to Morocco (David Butler, 1942). They have been shipwrecked and come floating on a raft in front of a projected New York in the background. In the final scene, Bob Hope throws himself to the ground and begins to scream and foam at the mouth. The others stare at him in astonishment and ask what in the world he is doing. He immediately calms down and says, 'This is how you have to do it if you want to win an Oscar.'

When I see Face to Face and Liv Ullmann's incredibly loyal effort on my behalf, I still can't help thinking on The Road to Morocco.

(Ullmann got the second of her two Oscar nominations for the film.)

http://www.ingmarbergman.se/en/production/face-face

ice cream social justice (Dr Morbius), Sunday, 25 February 2018 21:36 (nine months ago) Permalink

Yeah there was an excerpt of that part from Images in the programme notes.

xyzzzz__, Sunday, 25 February 2018 21:54 (nine months ago) Permalink


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