North Korea

Message Bookmarked
Bookmark Removed
North Korea: Bush is ``half-baked hooligan bereft of any personality as a human being . . . and a Philistine whom we can never deal with.’’

Pyongyang's state-run news agency responded over the weekend with a quote from an unnamed ministry spokesman calling Mr. Bush a "dictator," a "cowboy" and a "half-baked man in terms of morality.”

I know they're shadowy Stalinists or whatnot, but they sure keep brinksmanship colorful.

andy --, Monday, 2 May 2005 21:39 (twelve years ago) Permalink

that thing in the new yorker a few weeks back about n. korea kidnapping a director so big kim could make godzilla movies made me fall in love with them all over again

strng hlkngtn, Monday, 2 May 2005 21:42 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Stalinist North Korea has stepped up its campaign against long hair and untidy attire which its media says represents a "corrupt capitalist" lifestyle, reports said.

North Korean state television, radio and newspapers have led the grooming drive, urging people to cut their hair short and to dress tidily, the BBC said in a dispatch citing broadcasts from Pyongyang.

Men were asked to have crew cuts with hair growing up to five centimeters (two inches) in a twice-a-month visit to the barber, it said.

http://secure.designerz.com/news-image.php?i=shared/lifestyle/SGE.AAB65.090105183816.photo00.quicklook.default-185x245.jpg
A North Korean soldier combs his hair at the truce village of Panmunjom

Not only health and hygiene but also intelligence was cited by the North Korean media as reasons for the crackdown on appearance.

Pyongyang television noted long hair "consumes a great deal of nutrition" and could thus rob the brain of energy, according to the BBC.

But another serious reason came from state radio which said tidy attire "is important in repelling the enemies' maneuvers to infiltrate corrupt capitalist ideas and lifestyle" in North Korea, it said.

The ruling communist party newspaper, Rodong Sinmun, even warned inappropriate appearance under foreign influence could lead to national decay.

"People who wear other's style of dress and live in other's style will become fools and that nation will come to ruin," Rodong was cited as saying.

Some North Korean TV broadcasts adopted a hidden-camera style video of longhaired men on various locations throughout Pyongyang in an unprecedented break with their usual approach.

andy --, Monday, 2 May 2005 21:50 (twelve years ago) Permalink

man, you gotta wonder just what is *really* going on over there, what daily life is like, etc. so bizarre.

Shakey Mo Collier, Monday, 2 May 2005 21:52 (twelve years ago) Permalink

There's a really great book I read recently on North Korea, let me dig up the info when I can (gotta catch my bus now, though).

Ned Raggett (Ned), Monday, 2 May 2005 22:00 (twelve years ago) Permalink

In the meantime, Tombot to thread.

Ned Raggett (Ned), Monday, 2 May 2005 22:00 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Ned's catching a bus... to a North Korean penitentiary!

donut debonair (donut), Monday, 2 May 2005 22:02 (twelve years ago) Permalink

sorry, but when Ned said he had to catch a bus I pictured him saying it at the top of his lungs in a Barney Gumble voice while wearing mismatched shoes and an oversized Tweety t-shirt.

Shakey Mo Collier, Monday, 2 May 2005 22:06 (twelve years ago) Permalink

nighty night!

g e o f f (gcannon), Monday, 2 May 2005 22:08 (twelve years ago) Permalink

it's not so hard to figure out what daily life is like! it's sort of like living in a cold dark country where the state makes you get your fucking hair cut and also you're starving.

g e o f f (gcannon), Monday, 2 May 2005 22:15 (twelve years ago) Permalink

It looks like S. Korea is wasting power, while N Korea is conserving natural resources, for Mother Earth's sake.

andy --, Monday, 2 May 2005 22:18 (twelve years ago) Permalink

"it's not so hard to figure out what daily life is like! it's sort of like living in a cold dark country where the state makes you get your fucking hair cut and also you're starving. "

so we're told, but that's bound to be a generalization, and doesn't get at how such a society sustains itself or functions internally - what do people do all day? is everyone starving to death except for some narrow upper-class echelon of rulers? if things are so horrible, why don't the people rebel? is there any resistance at all, any underground, black market? what is holding everything in place, etc.?

Shakey Mo Collier, Monday, 2 May 2005 22:21 (twelve years ago) Permalink

what is holding everything in place, etc.?

umm....the blood of the proletariat? Guns?

giboyeux (skowly), Monday, 2 May 2005 22:23 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Holy shit their official site is the slowest I've seen in years:
http://www.korea-dpr.com/

But it does have an esperanto section, unlike KFC's.

andy --, Monday, 2 May 2005 22:23 (twelve years ago) Permalink

I really do think that N. Korea is probably one of those places where it really IS as bad as you might think.

giboyeux (skowly), Monday, 2 May 2005 22:23 (twelve years ago) Permalink

yeah, but we don't know. it's just a black hole. the fact that information is so tightly controlled, and that what does actually get out is so goddamned weird and preposterous, means we're left projecting our own fears and assumptions on them... we don't *really* know what's going.

Shakey Mo Collier, Monday, 2 May 2005 22:25 (twelve years ago) Permalink

yeah, but we don't know. it's just a black hole. the fact that information is so tightly controlled, and that what does actually get out is so goddamned weird and preposterous, means we're left projecting our own fears and assumptions on them... we don't *really* know what's going on.

Shakey Mo Collier, Monday, 2 May 2005 22:25 (twelve years ago) Permalink

asiatimes reported there was a riot at a world cup qualifier recently, the police were powerless. first civil disobedience in decades.

g e o f f (gcannon), Monday, 2 May 2005 22:25 (twelve years ago) Permalink

http://www.korea-dpr.com/index_r1_c1.jpg

Hurting (Hurting), Monday, 2 May 2005 22:27 (twelve years ago) Permalink

x-post Shaky

Oh absolutely. I still think that--unlike the USSR or China--shit is really, really bad in N. Korea. Someone already linked through this article (the nighttime pic), but it's still worth reading.

giboyeux (skowly), Monday, 2 May 2005 22:28 (twelve years ago) Permalink

that thing in the new yorker a few weeks back about n. korea kidnapping a director so big kim could make godzilla movies made me fall in love with them all over again

you only just now found out about this, strongo?!?

Eisbär (llamasfur), Monday, 2 May 2005 22:29 (twelve years ago) Permalink

It's funny how we were able to get a rover on Mars before we were able to get a photo of evidence of dissent in North Korea.

donut debonair (donut), Monday, 2 May 2005 22:29 (twelve years ago) Permalink

haha - that's awesome. Soccer, the people's sport, the great leveller...

Shakey Mo Collier, Monday, 2 May 2005 22:29 (twelve years ago) Permalink

An oldie, but a goodie about life on the north side.

Pleasant Plains /// (Pleasant Plains ///), Monday, 2 May 2005 22:34 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Well, didn't some American defector finally leave to South Korea? Like his wife was kidnapped from the South and the North finally granted them permission to emigrate? The US was interested in pressing charges against the guy, but it'd be cool to hear from him how shit really is.

andy --, Monday, 2 May 2005 22:34 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Does anyone have images of soccer riots?

A homunculus of Darby Crash, .... created for the purposes of *EVIL* (ex machina, Monday, 2 May 2005 22:39 (twelve years ago) Permalink

the written word is a tool of the imperialist wolves, cast it away or the nation shall rot.

g e o f f (gcannon), Monday, 2 May 2005 22:59 (twelve years ago) Permalink

we don't *really* know what's going on.

i don't think that's *completely* true. a number of journalists have managed to get in and get some information out despite having to be herded around by government "translators."

i sort of imagine there not being any public dissent, at all. as for private dissent, well... i get the sense that the people of north korea have been fed a very strict regimen of limited info for over 50 years and thus don't really have much sense of the outside world, or other ideologies they could counterpose to that of their nation's. so if there is private dissent i'm guessing it takes a weird intra-ideological form that we wouldn't recognize or be very happy with.

Amateur(ist) (Amateur(ist)), Tuesday, 3 May 2005 00:35 (twelve years ago) Permalink

the people of north korea totally need to pitch in and get a new server.

mark p (Mark P), Tuesday, 3 May 2005 01:19 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Well, didn't some American defector finally leave to South Korea? Like his wife was kidnapped from the South and the North finally granted them permission to emigrate? The US was interested in pressing charges against the guy, but it'd be cool to hear from him how shit really is.

He left to Japan. His wife was kidnapped from Japan in the 1970s along with about a dozen others. She came from a town next to the Japan Sea, and she was abducted by North Korean agents and whisked back to North Korea. It's another completely bizarre episode.

The American was in the army serving in South Korea in the 1960s. He claims that he was afraid of being sent to Vietnam, so defected to the North. The U.S. army convicted him of dissertion a few months ago, and he served a very lenient sentence that was like community service.

He did an interview with Japanese TV and described his life in North Korea in general terms. His most memorable quote was saying, "I lived like a dog." He also blasted the North Korean government for all the obvious reasons.

supercub, Tuesday, 3 May 2005 01:19 (twelve years ago) Permalink

why can I not figure out italics in HTML? Somebody please help me.

supercub, Tuesday, 3 May 2005 01:20 (twelve years ago) Permalink

it's a tricky one. you have to use i. a good way to remember this is by remembering that the first four letters of 'italics' and 'italy' and interchangeable, and interchangeable starts with i.

mark p (Mark P), Tuesday, 3 May 2005 01:26 (twelve years ago) Permalink

like ithis?

supercub, Tuesday, 3 May 2005 01:28 (twelve years ago) Permalink

hahaha! I'm such an idiot!

supercub, Tuesday, 3 May 2005 01:28 (twelve years ago) Permalink

iidiot

(ok, I'll stop now)

supercub, Tuesday, 3 May 2005 01:29 (twelve years ago) Permalink

i'm kind of amazed that you even attempted that.

mark p (Mark P), Tuesday, 3 May 2005 01:30 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Yeah, so am ii.

supercub, Tuesday, 3 May 2005 01:30 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Look, I'm smart

supercub, Tuesday, 3 May 2005 01:33 (twelve years ago) Permalink

There was an in depth article in Harpers a year or two ago worth finding, really brutal eye-opening stuff. And the New Yorker had that segment about the director, but I think there was a more complete article some time ago? One thing I remember reading is that it is of course impossible to stop radio transmissions coming over the border from South Korea, but most North Koreans have been taught that what they are receiving are all lies, capitalist propaganda.

Dan Selzer (Dan Selzer), Tuesday, 3 May 2005 01:45 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Actually, although it is impossible to completely stop radio transmissions from South Korea, I believe that all radios sold (legally) in South Korea are required to be specially equipped to receive only the state frequency.

Hurting (Hurting), Tuesday, 3 May 2005 02:14 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Actually, although it is impossible to completely stop radio transmissions from South Korea, I believe that all radios sold (legally) in North Korea are required to be specially equipped to receive only the state frequency.

Hurting (Hurting), Tuesday, 3 May 2005 02:14 (twelve years ago) Permalink

It is a great thread title, and another grasshopper thing.

Eyeball Kicks (Eyeball Kicks), Tuesday, 3 May 2005 02:33 (twelve years ago) Permalink

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1111/is_1830_305/ai_94044069

I assume this is the Harper's piece mentioned upthread. It's a pretty hard read.

Daniel Cohen (dayan), Tuesday, 3 May 2005 08:36 (twelve years ago) Permalink

five months pass...
http://www.metroblogging.com/NKDelegation2005.swf

Alba (Alba), Wednesday, 19 October 2005 17:07 (twelve years ago) Permalink

http://www.korea-dpr.com/kfa2006/KFADELEGATION05.wmv also good.

Alba (Alba), Wednesday, 19 October 2005 17:11 (twelve years ago) Permalink

one year passes...

http://www.jonhs.net/freemovies/welcome_to_north_korea.htm

This is good - it's from 2001 so some may have already seen it.

Hurting 2, Monday, 16 July 2007 03:33 (ten years ago) Permalink

also good:

http://www.yhchang.com/CUNNILINGUS_IN_NORTH_KOREA.html

c sharp major, Monday, 16 July 2007 11:36 (ten years ago) Permalink

one year passes...

N. Korea Says It Is Holding Reporters

SEOUL, South Korea — North Korea confirmed Saturday that it had detained two American journalists on charges of “illegally intruding” into the North through its border with China.

The journalists, Laura Ling, a Chinese-American, and Euna Lee, a Korean-American, both working for Current TV, were on a reporting trip along the border when they were detained by North Korean border guards, according to human rights activists and a South Korean news report. Their colleague, Mitch Koss, and their Chinese guide were reported to have been detained by Chinese border guards.

“A competent organ is now investigating the case,” the North’s official news agency, KCNA, said.

skamokawa WA (jergins), Saturday, 21 March 2009 19:30 (eight years ago) Permalink

two weeks pass...

in this world i take a moment to google the distance from earth to the moon, in km, just in case

Karl Malone, Tuesday, 28 November 2017 19:56 (one month ago) Permalink

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DPv1UfRXUAE-7eG.png

calzino, Tuesday, 28 November 2017 20:57 (one month ago) Permalink

the question is what happens when they get fully capable nukes and then do something nobody wants them to do or ask for something nobody is prepared to give them.

Josh in Chicago, Tuesday, 28 November 2017 20:59 (one month ago) Permalink

They are capable enough now. But there wasn’t a good military solutio even if we went back in time and asked that question. Also important to remember that China and Russia became nuclear states and it’s probably good that our negotiating position wasn’t as unrealistic as our current “denuclearize” terms w DPRK.

Nerdstrom Poindexter, Tuesday, 28 November 2017 22:05 (one month ago) Permalink

Well, Russia going nuclear dictated the terms of US foreign policy for almost half a century, and in that conflict we came as close to nuclear Armageddon as ever before, so there's that.
But assuming NK behaves like every other nuclear power, more or less, then a nuclear NK won't be any different than a non-nuclear NK. They'll just keep to themselves and do their thing.

Josh in Chicago, Tuesday, 28 November 2017 22:09 (one month ago) Permalink

DPRK engages in a fair amount of military provocation and saber rattling. These are likely to continue as part of 'doing their thing', but so far these have only led to minimal bloodshed outside its own borders.

A is for (Aimless), Tuesday, 28 November 2017 22:50 (one month ago) Permalink

Pretty much. The audience for the launches, the saber rattling, and the reports of belicosity from the U.S., is the North Korean people.

Kim et al knows that they launch a nuke and a dozen will fly back. Their intention is to a) maintain domestic war footing propaganda, and b) deter a preemptive American strike. Game theory wise, its a pretty stable situation so long as NK maintains deterrence, and outsiders don't try to start the coup ending the rule of Kim and his allied elites. It's a pity for those trapped within.

It's obvious that the Pentagon is not so keen on preemptive strikes. Plus, major parts of the defense budget are predicated on hostilities with this imp.

Sanpaku, Tuesday, 28 November 2017 23:09 (one month ago) Permalink

genocidal rhetoric https://t.co/WTFpvMYSGl

— Adam H. Johnson (@adamjohnsonNYC) November 29, 2017

ice cream social justice (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 29 November 2017 16:26 (one month ago) Permalink

Holodomor-ica.

Wes Brodicus, Wednesday, 29 November 2017 20:09 (one month ago) Permalink

Xpost Sanctions on that level would be indefensibly evil and definitely start a world war.

Nerdstrom Poindexter, Wednesday, 29 November 2017 20:42 (one month ago) Permalink

Sanctions on that level would be an act of war.

A is for (Aimless), Wednesday, 29 November 2017 20:46 (one month ago) Permalink

DPRK would call it an act of war and people wouldn’t realize the serious level of escalation we were at because they’ve been calling various things an “act of war” for years now.

Nerdstrom Poindexter, Wednesday, 29 November 2017 21:02 (one month ago) Permalink

dprk continues to develop icbm nuclear capability juche military first ideology
increasing free market liberalization on the dl
u.s. imperialist saber rattling
everything is fine
20 years later
we're all
friends

XxxxxxxXxxxxxxxxXxxxx (dylannn), Wednesday, 29 November 2017 21:04 (one month ago) Permalink

is there a thread for missile defense? i don't really want to start a new one, but this NYT article about how a recent SCUD missile from Yemen almost certainly was NOT shot down by Saudi defense batteries - contrary to what was claimed at the time - reminded me of my general anxiety about how unlikely it is that a nuclear weapon could successfully be intercepted, especially given the amount of time that would elapse before a countershot would even be fired (since the defender would probably want to be absolutely certain that it wasn't a false alarm before launching a counterattack).

my (obviously and admittedly limited ) understanding is that the "star wars"/SDI defense system was deeply flawed and basically a complete failure despite massive investment. have things changed since then?

Karl Malone, Monday, 4 December 2017 21:35 (one month ago) Permalink

dprk continues to develop icbm nuclear capability juche military first ideology
increasing free market liberalization on the dl
u.s. imperialist saber rattling
everything is fine
20 years later
we're all
friends

― XxxxxxxXxxxxxxxxXxxxx (dylannn), Wednesday, 29 November 2017 Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

eating plums
out of the icebox
so sweet and
so cold
delicious

xyzzzz__, Monday, 4 December 2017 23:11 (one month ago) Permalink

depends who you ask, Karl.

xp

Lyudmila Pavlichenko (dandydonweiner), Monday, 4 December 2017 23:51 (one month ago) Permalink

Hush! The fact that the SDI missile defense is a deeply flawed, massively expensive complete failure is classified information which must be kept from our enemies.

A is for (Aimless), Tuesday, 5 December 2017 01:26 (one month ago) Permalink

SDI is probably a complete failure compared to its initial goal of permitting a US nuclear first strike against the Soviet Union. There would be way too much radar clutter in the commies retaliatory strike from first/second stage debris for targeting, and it isn't difficult to add indistinguishable decoys to the payloads. Plus building bullet to hit another bullet is just intrinsically hard.

Against NK, there's a chance that the redundancy of launch phase and midcourse interceptors would work against a single launch. Which is why if I were NK, my retaliation would already be sitting in a basement somewhere in LA or NY.

On the other hand, military research boondoggles are how we fund a lot of basic science and engineering education in the US.

Sanpaku, Tuesday, 5 December 2017 02:06 (one month ago) Permalink

Another data point: Saudi Arabia's upgraded Patriot missiles failed to intercept Houthi launched ballistic missile in 5 out of 5 launches.

Sanpaku, Tuesday, 5 December 2017 23:35 (one month ago) Permalink

When not operated by US crews, the Patriot and its descendants perform poorly, it’s true.

El Tomboto, Wednesday, 6 December 2017 00:15 (one month ago) Permalink

military research boondoggles are how we fund a lot of basic science and engineering education in the US.

which makes them sort of not boondoggles? No more so than that fusion reactor that 20 some odd countries are building in the south of France or wherever

El Tomboto, Wednesday, 6 December 2017 00:17 (one month ago) Permalink

you mean ITER? not a boondoggle.

the late great, Wednesday, 6 December 2017 00:27 (one month ago) Permalink

Buck Turgidson lives

Using plausible estimates, I find that (under optimistic assumptions) 87% of western pundits are functionally insane https://t.co/NZ12E2IgfL by @kevinrogerjames pic.twitter.com/ydbiRmvRr7

— Jon Schwarz (@schwarz) December 6, 2017

ice cream social justice (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 6 December 2017 18:17 (one month ago) Permalink

oof. i guess i'm glad @kevinrogerjames only has about a dozen followers on twitter

Karl Malone, Wednesday, 6 December 2017 18:24 (one month ago) Permalink

the thin line between satire and reality in dr strangelove is quickly dissolving

Karl Malone, Wednesday, 6 December 2017 18:25 (one month ago) Permalink

it was always mighty thin... the only reason the film is a comedy is they tried to write it 'straight' and kept laughing.

ice cream social justice (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 6 December 2017 18:29 (one month ago) Permalink

not sure how substantive a shift this actually is but this seems positive to me

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said tonight the U.S. would be willing to enter negotiations with North Korea without requiring that it agree beforehand to give up its nuclear weapons program.

— NPR (@NPR) December 12, 2017

global tetrahedron, Tuesday, 12 December 2017 22:59 (one month ago) Permalink

Some disagreements on that. Interesting back and forth in this thread from NK watchers.

Don't strain yourself too hard looking for change in NK policy from Tillerson. 1) Nothing he's said is new for the US position, and 2) nobody believes Tillerson speaks for Trump, not least NK

— Van Jackson (@WonkVJ) December 12, 2017

Nerdstrom Poindexter, Tuesday, 12 December 2017 23:23 (one month ago) Permalink

FFS

White House says not right time for North Korea talks, despite Tillerson overture https://t.co/rmT79dOTXg pic.twitter.com/rGEdw9c4SL

— Reuters Top News (@Reuters) December 13, 2017

Nerdstrom Poindexter, Wednesday, 13 December 2017 19:50 (one month ago) Permalink

While we are playing, people starve

xyzzzz__, Monday, 18 December 2017 15:08 (four weeks ago) Permalink

there's been for the past few years, a disagreement on how much north korea is suffering, with people like lankov on one side N Korea and the myth of starvation arguing that upwards of 70% of people are making money in private market ventures / food is being exported to china / reforms in agriculture have fixed a few lingering problems -- but even he agrees that most people are chronically malnourished and some regions of the country have remained basically as shitty as they were a decade before-- and aid workers, who still report that people are starving.

i hope it comes across on this thread but i'm sympathetic to north korea. i think sanctions should be lifted. the u.s. trying to starve out the kim regime isn't working and is unnecessarily cruel.

but at the same time the government of the dprk has a history of using starvation as a weapon against the north korean people. In North Korea, hunger isn’t a function of production, but of state policy -- so, like lankov is right and things are improving, for example, people are being allowed to tend their own private plots, but those harvests have often been seized by the state. and these private plots are only sorta tolerated Farmers Baffled by Order Reversal / North Korea orders all privately cultivated crops to be cut down even though they're feeding at least half of all north koreans: State policy controls how much food is imported, how much is spent on things like fertilizer and machinery, who can grow what and where, what can be sold, how much is seized from those who grow and sell it, where the harvest goes once it’s collected, who gets a ration and how much, and how effectively foreign aid agencies can deliver aid. -- the border with china being more tightly sealed is also a factor, and also the government going after remittances (and also sanctions trying to hit remittances, too).

XxxxxxxXxxxxxxxxXxxxx (dylannn), Monday, 18 December 2017 17:02 (four weeks ago) Permalink

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sGinGQrofos

infinity (∞), Monday, 18 December 2017 19:20 (four weeks ago) Permalink

not sure if it's been posted before, but a great series of blog posts on a couple of friends who traveled by train from Vienna to Pyongyang. The photos as they travel from Siberia through North Korea down to Pyongyang are fantastic.

Fizzles, Wednesday, 27 December 2017 11:22 (three weeks ago) Permalink

that is super old

p sure we talked abt it a few yrs ago and posted the link

thats rly the best way to see the real nk but very difficult to get in thru there especially now

infinity (∞), Wednesday, 27 December 2017 17:02 (three weeks ago) Permalink

The last New Yorker piece where the guy had gone a few times in previous years and returned not long after some incendiary Trump tweets was really good. Also recounts meeting with NK diplomats in New York.

Nerdstrom Poindexter, Wednesday, 27 December 2017 21:55 (three weeks ago) Permalink

love that blog of photos of the trip from austria to pyongyang, great stuff

ogmor, Thursday, 28 December 2017 01:16 (two weeks ago) Permalink

Looking at that football game above, I wondered briefly which colour uniform was the DPRK until I saw the women in red looming almost a head taller than the Japanese team. That's not a typical characteristic of Koreans compared to Japanese people is it?

attention vampire (MatthewK), Thursday, 28 December 2017 01:59 (two weeks ago) Permalink

South Koreans tend to be slightly taller than Japanese people

I assume this applies to healthy North Koreans, as well. The North Korean men I’ve met have mostly all been around 5’8”-10”, with very few being taller and bigger (fatter)

infinity (∞), Thursday, 28 December 2017 02:26 (two weeks ago) Permalink

The height of the North Korean women I’ve met has varied a lot more, from 5’0” to 5’8”

infinity (∞), Thursday, 28 December 2017 02:29 (two weeks ago) Permalink

Tall Asians: C or D?

XxxxxxxXxxxxxxxxXxxxx (dylannn), Friday, 29 December 2017 15:55 (two weeks ago) Permalink

i want to say something on this north korea thread about oil shipments. i think the situation is interesting not because it shows the chinese are violating sanctions--maybe they are but not with ship-to-ship transfers of refined fuel probably--but the power of the informal economy where i assume this oil is going and the problem of enforcing any of these sanctions. all along the road, it's been the same situation anyways, where the kim regime gets what they need and forces the rest of the population to fend for themselves.

there are much easier ways to violate sanctions-- i mean they could have just ran ships to nk harbors and sold oil and then denied it, too. but there's a pipeline that's exempt from sanctions (because they can't turn it off without damaging it) that runs from the liaodong peninsula to sinuiji and north korean refineries. ship-to-ship transfers of refined petroleum sounds like smuggling-- chinese authorities just seized a few days before this a shipment of smuggled fuel meant for ship-to-ship transfers.

russia is far less enthusiastic about sanctions and still probably aren't thrilled about the huge amount of smuggling by russian ships -- but it's proof i guess that there's big money in smuggling oil right now, especially as sanctions hit. the price of oil in north korea has risen which makes smuggling profitable. if china is defying sanctions they'd be sending it thru the pipeline or running ships. oil is still moving but it's harder for people working in the burgeoning market economy to get it, if the state is getting the small supply, and they've got money to spend on fuel from chinese profiteers, or russian ones.

with established smuggling routes + evidence of a huge operation conducted by smugglers to bring in refined petroleum, it's harder than you might think to shut down fuel smuggling. when you're talking the chinese northeast + dprk + russian far east, lots of people trying to make money off the situation, deep deep corruption... it's hard to say, you know, just stop the boats and enforce sanctions! southern europe has a problem with organized crime bringing in oil from isis, even.

XxxxxxxXxxxxxxxxXxxxx (dylannn), Friday, 29 December 2017 16:09 (two weeks ago) Permalink

Now the regime has decided to let its people invest directly in production, and thus seems to have de facto legalized ‘pseudo-state property.’ If this is true and if the regime does not renege on such commitments, North Korea’s economy could see an investment boom as more private investors feel free to create new, larger businesses, under the cover of the state. That said, without outside support, the necessary longer-term investments in infrastructure will probably not be possible due to a scarcity of funds.

http://www.38north.org/2017/12/pward122117/

i would buy a theory that china is overlooking something like smuggling fuel because it helps keep alive players in the new market economy which are the most effective element there is pushing north korea toward reform.

XxxxxxxXxxxxxxxxXxxxx (dylannn), Friday, 29 December 2017 16:16 (two weeks ago) Permalink

https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/12/29/574508075/south-korea-seizes-ship-suspected-of-at-sea-oil-transfer-to-benefit-north-korea

The Hong Kong-flagged ship was chartered by Taiwanese company Billions Bunker Group and previously visited South Korea's Yeosu Port on Oct. 11 to load up on Japanese refined oil and head to its claimed destination in Taiwan, the authorities noted.

Instead of going to Taiwan, however, the vessel transferred the oil to a North Korean ship, the Sam Jong 2, and three other non-North Korean vessels in international waters, they said.

XxxxxxxXxxxxxxxxXxxxx (dylannn), Friday, 29 December 2017 18:23 (two weeks ago) Permalink

"rare" a/k/a the exact same thing he says every new years pic.twitter.com/kOKvzUgwtO

— Adam H. Johnson (@adamjohnsonNYC) January 2, 2018

ice cream social justice (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 2 January 2018 20:39 (two weeks ago) Permalink

Hope is not a plan except when it comes to not starting a nuclear war, when it turns out it definitely is https://t.co/XVRHtpH1zE

— Jon Schwarz (@schwarz) January 9, 2018

ice cream social justice (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 9 January 2018 19:34 (one week ago) Permalink

It may in fact be the case that North Korea is the biggest threat to US national security, but that's just another way of stating the obvious, which is that 2018 America is the safest country that's ever existed in human history https://t.co/O5aqeQ3lZB pic.twitter.com/Hq5Goq3f1t

— Jon Schwarz (@schwarz) January 16, 2018

ice cream social justice (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 16 January 2018 18:24 (yesterday) Permalink

just wondering. has anyone with decent credentials released an independent and credible estimate of NK's progress toward hydrogen bombs? I know a recent NK test was publically deemed inconclusive in terms of whether it was a fission or fusion device, but government sources about such matters may be tampered with for policy reasons.

A is for (Aimless), Tuesday, 16 January 2018 19:09 (yesterday) Permalink

Kelsey Atherton Ankit Panda and Vipin Narang have writing that’s worth seeking out in that vein https://www.popsci.com/north-korea-working-theromonuclear-bomb

Nerdstrom Poindexter, Tuesday, 16 January 2018 19:35 (yesterday) Permalink

ty. I was aware of most, but not all of the info in that article and the additional info was worth the time spent reading it.

A is for (Aimless), Tuesday, 16 January 2018 19:44 (yesterday) Permalink


You must be logged in to post. Please either login here, or if you are not registered, you may register here.