Canada, hockey and all that

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So does this mean the entire country will take an unofficial national holiday tomorrow because the hangovers will be so intense?

Ned Raggett, Sunday, 24 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

And more seriously -- I suspect it must have felt pretty damn good for y'all up there to take out the US in both contests. ;-) Nice job.

Ned Raggett, Sunday, 24 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

I'm SO pleased that Canada won I'm going to take the day off tomorrow.

JM, Sunday, 24 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Well minus Gretzky's whinning and considering the sorry state of the nhl teams they still have, I am happy for them. They certainly played like they wanted it more.

bnw, Sunday, 24 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

I love Don Cherry showing the coaches giving the Russia the 0 finger two handed quebecois salute after Hendersons goal. Yes, much drinking will be done by all.
Much more Molson Cnadian then usual too.

Mr Noodles, Sunday, 24 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

You should hear the all the noise going on outside here! I was at Gretzky's bar just last night, but I'll bet it's total insanity in there right now. Maple leaf forever baby!

Kim, Sunday, 24 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

I'm already going through Olympics withdrawal.

geeta, Sunday, 24 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

The Cermony isnt till 9 oclock ro something silly like that.

Mr Noodles, Sunday, 24 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

it was a wonderful game, not as great as the world cup in 96 but still pretty excellent. but, come on, canada should have won as practically every player on their team was an ex-mvp it wasn't as if they were huge underdogs. i bet patrick roy feels like an idiot while sitting in his basement here pouting because he was the ninth player selected.

keith, Sunday, 24 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Underdogs or not, breaking a fifty year losing streak is pretty exciting. It *was* a great game. Especially that first period, wow. I was getting worried there for a while during the third. My conscience extends apologies to all the lovely Americans on the board for the horrible things I shouted at my tv during the heat of the moment. :)

Kim, Sunday, 24 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Oh, don't worry, I was hoping the US would go down as well. Did you see that that bastard Cheney was in the audience? I'd rather not give him another chance to get all puffed up.

Ned Raggett, Sunday, 24 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

I did indeed. How convenient for Canada was it that the three syllable "U.S.A! U.S.A!" chant was easily returned as "CAN-A-DA! CAN- A-DA!"... they're just now showing the tremendous crowds in Ottawa up on Parliament Hill, and also all the revellers jumping up and down on top of streetcars here in Toronto. Heh. Idiots. We sure do love our hockey.

Kim, Sunday, 24 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Wow!!! Thank goodness that's over, now I can get some homework done. It was so intense, I just kept diving into the floor and shouting. This feels sooo good, go Canada GO!

Evangeline, Sunday, 24 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Great game! Two formidable teams, but Canada earned it all the way, I gotta say. though Richter (the American goalie) did a pretty amazing job, I thought.

Joe, Monday, 25 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

That was a fantastic game, I love Ice hockey but see all too little of it over here. Was the game really as big as the commentators on our TV (one of them the president of the Salt Lake City side, can't remember the name)were saying? They were saying that it would get more vieweres than both the Superbowl and the world series this year!

chris, Monday, 25 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Ice Hockey is HUGE as a spectator sport at the olympics because it's a Proper Team Sport, ie. otherwise mild-mannered spectators like my mother can yell KILL! at the top of their lungs while watching it, which is impossible with the bobsleigh for example. Also in Minnesota, where there is inexplicably NO PRO HOCKEY TEAM since the North Stars pissed off to somewhere with no snow, it's the sport of choice for boys. Which is why most of the US ice hockey team winds up coming from there (and also why I used to think the mullet was invented there, we called it Hockey Hair in the wayback).

suzy, Monday, 25 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

do they not have electricity where you come from in Minn?

Clearly the Minnesota Wild exist...

JM, Monday, 25 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

I forgot about the Minnesota Wild but that's because I've lived AWAY for 10 years. It took two years for me to find out the Stars upped sticks!

suzy, Monday, 25 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

The Minnesota Wild aren't a hockey team, they're an embarrassment.

Dan Perry, Monday, 25 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

A proper team name should end in 's'. Therefore the Wild does not exist.

Steven James, Monday, 25 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Yeah, like the Manchester Uniteds. or the Boston Red Soxes.

fritz, Monday, 25 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Ned, weren't you aware of the Cheney MO: "Where the camera is, I am"? Though I _did_ wonder what he was doing there. Perhaps his nurse took a break from sitting on his lap....

Nichole Graham, Monday, 25 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

To give Mr. James some honor back, the MU nickname is the Red Devils.

Ned Raggett, Monday, 25 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

I spent several minutes trying to figure out how the Marvel Universe fit into the equation before gaining a clue. God, I'm a geek.

Dan Perry, Monday, 25 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Red Sox = Red Socks. Plus we're talking hockey, not those pansy assed "ball" sports.

bnw, Monday, 25 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

But Canada lost the curling gold. How do they cope with that?

nickn, Tuesday, 26 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Simple. It's curling, not hockey.

Kim, Tuesday, 26 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Dan's right about the MN Wild. Litmus test: does my mother talk about them? Has she shouted at television when they're on enough to make the dog go into barking frenzy? I. Don't. Think. So.

Anyway, one of her customers was on the US Men's Curling Team. She said he was just thrilled to be going as 43 year old guys don't go to the Olympics many other ways.

suzy, Tuesday, 26 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

ten years pass...

40 years ago today:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lMf2fAXPS1Q

My school gathered a bunch of classes together in the grade 6 pod to watch the game together. Sorry to say that I hated all the attention at the time--I was a baseball fan--and was probably the only kid in there not overjoyed.

clemenza, Friday, 28 September 2012 12:33 (five years ago) Permalink

I was reading about that earlier this month. I had no idea it was THAT big a thing.

Ned Raggett, Friday, 28 September 2012 13:49 (five years ago) Permalink

No exaggeration--one of the three or four key moments in Canadian history. Primarily because of the initial shock of losing the first game to the Russians; after five games, we were down 3-1-1. The Canadian team assumed they'd roll over the Russians, and they were in fact up by two goals a few minutes into the first game.

clemenza, Friday, 28 September 2012 14:35 (five years ago) Permalink

I mean that's just a sports and national identity thing that I've never lived through on the level that you're talking about. What DID make it so key? I've read the explanations and maybe I really do just have to be Canadian to understand, but the leap from 'damn this was a crazy shock' to 'right up on there with confederation!' is admittedly hard for me to fully grasp.

Ned Raggett, Friday, 28 September 2012 14:46 (five years ago) Permalink

Part of it also is me thinking "Well this was the 1970s not the 1870s, there was already a Canada for a long damn time!"

Ned Raggett, Friday, 28 September 2012 14:46 (five years ago) Permalink

Very much all about national identity--as you may have heard, we're a modest, self-deprecating country living in the shadow of a behemoth. (Contradicting what I wrote above--hockey is the one thing we're not modest about.) Have you ever seen My Life as a Dog? There's a scene where Ingemar Johansson wins the heavyweight title and the entire village pours into the street in celebration; very similar to that.

I generally can't take the Tragically Hip. The one song of theirs I absolutely love makes reference to the '72 series:

If there's a goal that everyone remembers
it was back in ole' '72
We all squeezed the stick and we all pulled the trigger
And all I remember was sitting beside you
You said you didn't give a fuck about hockey
And I never saw someone say that before
You held my hand and we walked home the long way
You were loosening my grip on Bobby Orr

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PVs_TZOZD0w

clemenza, Friday, 28 September 2012 15:58 (five years ago) Permalink

Haha okay that's nice.

Ned Raggett, Friday, 28 September 2012 16:29 (five years ago) Permalink

I've seen this couple-weeks-after-the-fact doc (included with the complete DVD of the series) in which a coupla newsmagazine-types are interviewing a Grade 8-ish class about the game, and one curmudgeonly kid says he hates hockey and wishes the Russkies won. Now I can't help believing that that kid WAS clemenza!

Faster than food (Myonga Vön Bontee), Friday, 28 September 2012 22:56 (five years ago) Permalink

(My Kindergarten class didn't get to watch the games - dunno what time they were televised, even. I do remember being vaguely aware of the victory several months after the fact, however; and I was no great hockey fan then either, despite owning a Bobby Orr sweater and lunchbox.)

Faster than food (Myonga Vön Bontee), Friday, 28 September 2012 23:00 (five years ago) Permalink

That's funny about the DVD doc--it may as well have been me. I even bet a friend (a quarter or something) and took Russia. One of the minor regrets of my life, the memory of sitting in there with half the school and not being able to share in the euphoria. (I made a big deal out of wanting Russia to win, too, so more than a few people knew of my heresy.) It was my inner Morbius--it's been a long, slow process, but I've mostly killed him off over the past 40 years.

clemenza, Friday, 28 September 2012 23:09 (five years ago) Permalink

'right up on there with confederation!'

Wait, I've never thought of that hockey game this way.

EveningStar (Sund4r), Friday, 28 September 2012 23:29 (five years ago) Permalink

Ned was responding to my contention that it was a key moment in Canadian history--blame me.

clemenza, Friday, 28 September 2012 23:30 (five years ago) Permalink

Is this really considered one of the 5 most important events in Canadian history by that many non-boomers?

xpost!

EveningStar (Sund4r), Friday, 28 September 2012 23:31 (five years ago) Permalink

what are the other candidates

mookieproof, Friday, 28 September 2012 23:34 (five years ago) Permalink

4. First national broadcast of The Great White North

Ned Raggett, Friday, 28 September 2012 23:34 (five years ago) Permalink

3. Timmy Horton desires more coffee with his morning donut.

Ned Raggett, Friday, 28 September 2012 23:35 (five years ago) Permalink

2. A solemn pledge by the entire nation to pretend "Tears Are Not Enough" never existed.

Ned Raggett, Friday, 28 September 2012 23:36 (five years ago) Permalink

1. publication of anne of green gables

mookieproof, Friday, 28 September 2012 23:36 (five years ago) Permalink

1. The mysterious disappearance of Don Cherry (pending).

Ned Raggett, Friday, 28 September 2012 23:36 (five years ago) Permalink

Off the top of my head: Confederation, the October Crisis, repatriation of the Constitution, the Conscription crisis, Newfoundland joining the country, two referenda on Quebec sovereignty, Pearson's Nobel Prize for resolving the Suez Crisis and the birth of UN peacekeeping, the building of the national railway, the discovery of insulin, ...

4xpost OK, Ned wins.

EveningStar (Sund4r), Friday, 28 September 2012 23:37 (five years ago) Permalink

Okay that whole Newfoundland thing still bemuses me. Were there border guards and attack Labradors preventing people from escaping Halifax?

Ned Raggett, Friday, 28 September 2012 23:39 (five years ago) Permalink

Some poetic license...in my demographic (so named), it looms large. Was it important like the War of 1812, or the FLQ crisis? No. But if you've followed the coverage this week, I think you'll agree that remains an extremely resonant benchmark.

Here are the results of a poll (conducted by the very official sounding "Dominion Institute"--they ran a supermarket chain, too) that places it fifth:

http://www.1972summitseries.com/greatestevent.html

clemenza, Friday, 28 September 2012 23:40 (five years ago) Permalink

three years pass...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gvbN-Grj7CY

two years in a row

F♯ A♯ (∞), Tuesday, 24 May 2016 01:36 (one year ago) Permalink

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=68YECPIrrQo

mookieproof, Tuesday, 24 May 2016 01:39 (one year ago) Permalink

that was pretty horrible, yes

i love the liiga

but i can't help but feel happy our team won

F♯ A♯ (∞), Tuesday, 24 May 2016 02:45 (one year ago) Permalink

tbh i'm happy too; i just wish perry wasn't the captain

mookieproof, Tuesday, 24 May 2016 02:51 (one year ago) Permalink

one year passes...

this is doing the rounds today (it does so every now and again though)

https://rarehistoricalphotos.com/canadian-soldiers-hockey-korea-1952/

https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-5qmViyQtuLg/WFtnPnNwEVI/AAAAAAAAMFw/7SMVQprYjX8GeuQSCcf5EpaPhuMbYr9bACLcB/s1600/canadians_soldiers_hockey_korea_1.jpg

a break from the nightmare that was the korean war:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Kapyong

Although heavily outnumbered, the 27th Brigade held their positions into the afternoon before the Australians were finally withdrawn to positions in the rear of the brigade, with both sides having suffered heavy casualties. The Chinese then turned their attention to the Canadians on Hill 677, but during a fierce night battle they were unable to dislodge them. The fighting helped blunt the Chinese offensive and the actions of the Australians and Canadians at Kapyong were important in assisting to prevent a breakthrough on the United Nations Command central front, and ultimately the capture of Seoul. The two battalions bore the brunt of the assault and stopped an entire Chinese division during the hard fought defensive battle. The next day the Chinese withdrew back up the valley, in order to regroup. Today, the battle is regarded as one of the most famous actions fought by the Australian and Canadian armies in Korea.

infinity (∞), Wednesday, 3 January 2018 17:33 (two weeks ago) Permalink


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