New Yorker magazine alert thread

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i used to read the main articles in every issue but let most of my 2010 issues pile up without reading anything.

if you read something good in a new issue of the New Yorker, post about it here.

gr8080, Friday, 31 December 2010 20:24 (seven years ago) Permalink

The review of the new Mao biographies.

Denby's Joan Crawford essay.

Gus Van Sotosyn (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 31 December 2010 20:26 (seven years ago) Permalink

A trick to not letting them pile up: if you're a subscriber, read a couple of articles online at work.

Gus Van Sotosyn (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 31 December 2010 20:27 (seven years ago) Permalink

Man I've thought abt starting this thread a few times

just sayin, Friday, 31 December 2010 20:27 (seven years ago) Permalink

this is why i don't have a subscription

ullr saves (gbx), Friday, 31 December 2010 20:30 (seven years ago) Permalink

Subscription to the print version: $39.95
Subscription to the iPad version: $234.53

http://runawayjuno.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/thumbs-up-low-res.jpg

Katstack Katstack! (Whiney G. Weingarten), Friday, 31 December 2010 21:13 (seven years ago) Permalink

AYYYY WE MAKING INTERNET MONEY

http://www.gifsoup.com/webroot/animatedgifs/490177_o.gif

Katstack Katstack! (Whiney G. Weingarten), Friday, 31 December 2010 21:14 (seven years ago) Permalink

alright enough

J0rdan S., Friday, 31 December 2010 21:15 (seven years ago) Permalink

Anything related to Mexico in the past year's issues has been pretty compelling, mostly by William Finnegan and Alec Wilkinson. The Jane Mayer article about the Koch brothers and the discreet establishment of the tea party is definitely worth reading. This week's Gopnik piece on postmodern desserts is a good read, too.

would like a calmer set (Eazy), Friday, 31 December 2010 21:39 (seven years ago) Permalink

Date and month/description of the cover of the issues you're referring to would be helpful!

gr8080, Friday, 31 December 2010 21:49 (seven years ago) Permalink

George Packer's essay on the decadence of the Senate was illuminating.

Gus Van Sotosyn (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 31 December 2010 21:51 (seven years ago) Permalink

Oh, and, both from around August, the profiles of Gil-Scott Heron and John Lurie.

would like a calmer set (Eazy), Friday, 31 December 2010 21:54 (seven years ago) Permalink

A trick to not letting them pile up: if you're a subscriber, read a couple of articles online at work.

― Gus Van Sotosyn (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, December 31, 2010 3:27 PM (1 hour ago) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

^otm

johnny crunch, Friday, 31 December 2010 21:56 (seven years ago) Permalink

links would be nice too

Ismael Klata, Friday, 31 December 2010 21:58 (seven years ago) Permalink

recent fire:

Joyce Carol Oates, Personal History, “A Widow’s Story,” The New Yorker, December 13, 2010, p. 70

David Owen, Annals of Environmentalism, “The Efficiency Dilemma,” The New Yorker, December 20, 2010, p. 78

johnny crunch, Friday, 31 December 2010 22:00 (seven years ago) Permalink

only abstracts are online for nonsubscribers for those i think

johnny crunch, Friday, 31 December 2010 22:00 (seven years ago) Permalink

Some articles are popular enough to remain accessible to all (e.g. the Packer article on the Senate to which I linked above).

Gus Van Sotosyn (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 31 December 2010 22:01 (seven years ago) Permalink

here's the one abt the koch bros - http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2010/08/30/100830fa_fact_mayer

just sayin, Friday, 31 December 2010 22:01 (seven years ago) Permalink

A thread like this for all (literary/current event) magazines would be pretty cool.

Mordy, Friday, 31 December 2010 22:31 (seven years ago) Permalink

Joyce Carol Oates article devastated me.

John Lurie article blew my mind.

dan selzer, Friday, 31 December 2010 23:09 (seven years ago) Permalink

dessert article was excellent, thanks for the recc

Mordy, Saturday, 1 January 2011 04:14 (seven years ago) Permalink

so john lurie is insane huh

mookieproof, Saturday, 1 January 2011 04:16 (seven years ago) Permalink

The review of the new Mao biographies.

seconded

I can take a youtube that's seldom seen, flip it, now it's a meme (Hurting 2), Saturday, 1 January 2011 08:09 (seven years ago) Permalink

Gopnik's desserts article was like a magazine version of the No Reservations episode in Spain.

Zsa Zsa Gay Bar (jaymc), Saturday, 1 January 2011 09:49 (seven years ago) Permalink

Which is not meant as a negative at all! They make good companion pieces.

Zsa Zsa Gay Bar (jaymc), Saturday, 1 January 2011 09:50 (seven years ago) Permalink

dessert article was good but gtf outta here w/ this

Finally, the server arrives with the Messi dessert, as Jordi fusses anxiously in the background. He presents half of a soccer ball, covered with artificial grass; the smell of grass perfumes the air. On the “grass” is a kind of delicately balanced, S-shaped, transparent plastic teeter-totter—like a French curve—with three small meringues on it, and a larger white-chocolate soccer ball balancing them on a protruding platform at the very end. A white candy netting lies on the grass near the white-chocolate ball.

Then, with a cat-that-swallowed-the-canary smile, the server puts a small MP3 player with a speaker on the table. He turns it on and nods.

An announcer’s voice, excited and frantic, explodes. Messi is on the move. “Messi turns and spins!” the announcer cries, and the roar of the crowd at the Bernabéu stadium, in Madrid, fills the table. The server nods, eyes intent. At the signal, you eat the first meringue.

“Messi is alone on goal!” the announcer cries. Another nod, you eat the next scented meringue. “Messi shoots!” A third nod, you eat the last meringue, and, as you do, the entire plastic S-curve, now unbalanced, flips up and over, like a spring, and the white-chocolate soccer ball at the end is released and propelled into the air, high above the white-candy netting.

“MESSI! GOOOOOAL!” The announcer’s voice reaches a hysterical peak and, as it does, the white-chocolate soccer ball drops, strikes, and breaks through the candy netting into the goal beneath it, and, as the ball hits the bottom of a little pit below, a fierce jet of passion-fruit cream and powdered mint leaves is released into your mouth, with a trail of small chocolate pop rocks rising in its wake. Then the passion-fruit cream settles, and you eat it all, with the white-chocolate ball, now broken, in bits within it.

You feel . . . something of what Messi must feel: first, the overwhelming presence of the grass beneath his feet (he’s a short player); then the tentative elegance of acquired skill, represented by the stepladder of the perfumed meringues; and, finally, the infantile joy, the childlike release, of scoring, represented by the passion-fruit cream and the candy-store pop rocks. I saw Jordi watching us from the kitchen entrance. He had the anxious-shading-into-delighted look that marks the artist.

johnny crunch, Saturday, 1 January 2011 21:22 (seven years ago) Permalink

David Owen, Annals of Environmentalism, “The Efficiency Dilemma,” The New Yorker, December 20, 2010, p. 78

Would not recommend this one! People have been arguing about Jevon's Paradox for a century now, and the article doesn't really advance any significant new ideas. As a primer on the "debate" around energy efficiency, however, it's alright.

hot lava hair (Z S), Saturday, 1 January 2011 23:35 (seven years ago) Permalink

^ totally recommend that

markers, Monday, 3 January 2011 17:15 (seven years ago) Permalink

yeah i read that one the other day, great stuff

ciderpress, Monday, 3 January 2011 17:16 (seven years ago) Permalink

it was interesting, lol scientists

ice cr?m, Monday, 3 January 2011 17:20 (seven years ago) Permalink

i liked this one, seemed like a great premise for movie: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2010/11/29/101129fa_fact_collins

gr8080, Monday, 3 January 2011 20:43 (seven years ago) Permalink

Haven't finished it yet, but I'm digging the Freud, psychiatry, and mental health in China article (subscription needed): http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2011/01/10/110110fa_fact_osnos

Mordy, Monday, 3 January 2011 21:20 (seven years ago) Permalink

The Patel story was amazing.

dan selzer, Monday, 3 January 2011 21:28 (seven years ago) Permalink

yeah needs a good 3rd act tho.

gr8080, Monday, 3 January 2011 21:34 (seven years ago) Permalink

he only contributed a couple of articles this year but i always enjoy atul gawande's stuff: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2010/08/02/100802fa_fact_gawande is probably his best piece this year

they fund ph.d studies, don't they? (Lamp), Tuesday, 4 January 2011 00:11 (seven years ago) Permalink

if anyone subscribes then feel free to webmail me the china/freud article kthx

max bro'd (nakhchivan), Tuesday, 4 January 2011 00:14 (seven years ago) Permalink

I would, but I can't figure out how to turn it into a pdf or another webmail suitable file.

Mordy, Tuesday, 4 January 2011 00:24 (seven years ago) Permalink

just copy and paste the text? or is it a different viewer thing.....no worries if that's the case

max bro'd (nakhchivan), Tuesday, 4 January 2011 00:27 (seven years ago) Permalink

the lehrer article is indeed pretty good and supplies ~evidence~ for my distrust of falsificationism and the inability of some ppl to think of scienctific 'knowledge' subjunctively, tho it does show science self-correcting so i don't read it as a total excoriation of the method

The decline effect is troubling because it reminds us how difficult it is to prove anything. We like to pretend that our experiments define the truth for us. But that’s often not the case. Just because an idea is true doesn’t mean it can be proved. And just because an idea can be proved doesn’t mean it’s true. When the experiments are done, we still have to choose what to believe.

max bro'd (nakhchivan), Tuesday, 4 January 2011 00:27 (seven years ago) Permalink

The recent one on the Vatican Library was pretty sweet: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2011/01/03/110103fa_fact_mendelsohn

I really like Toobin's diptych on JP Stevens and... the other guy.

nakhchivan, FYI, digital subscription gives you access to this weird applet-y, un-C&P text.

nomar little (Leee), Tuesday, 4 January 2011 01:26 (seven years ago) Permalink

Oh, and that review of the new biography on Sergei Diaghilev was A+++++++ and really wish it was available to all humans: http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics/books/2010/09/20/100920crbo_books_acocella

nomar little (Leee), Tuesday, 4 January 2011 01:37 (seven years ago) Permalink

you can c+p articles from an library institutional subscription, but the evan osnos china thing is from the jan 10 issue which is not on the library wires yet. if you can't get it nakh, bump this thread in a week or two and i'm sure someone from what the fuck am i getting myself into with this grad school stuff will help you out.

caek, Tuesday, 4 January 2011 01:46 (seven years ago) Permalink

Lamp, thanks for the Gawande link.

Kip Squashbeef (pixel farmer), Tuesday, 4 January 2011 01:54 (seven years ago) Permalink

ive been using a friends login for the subscriber stuff for a while and the interface is just so poor i dont usually bother to fuck w/it - seems theyd much rather you read the actual magazine - lol

ice cr?m, Tuesday, 4 January 2011 02:09 (seven years ago) Permalink

^agreed. kind of why i started this thread so i knew which actual magazine to pick up and start reading.

gr8080, Tuesday, 4 January 2011 02:13 (seven years ago) Permalink

p interesting follow-up of sorts on the recent duchenne muscular dystrophy activism article -- they just had a spot f/ clay matthews sponsored by cadillac during the orange bowl

johnny crunch, Tuesday, 4 January 2011 03:13 (seven years ago) Permalink

OK a TA I had in college had a poem published a few issues ago, woah.

nomar little (Leee), Tuesday, 4 January 2011 05:57 (seven years ago) Permalink

the whole Jan. 11 issue is worth picking up, the aforementioned freud in china article is amazing and hilarious, and it also has decent articles about belgium and why stieg larsson is so fucking popular

symsymsym, Monday, 10 January 2011 03:53 (seven years ago) Permalink

i know the concept of 'worth picking up' is still valid, even for subscribers, in translating to 'worth retrieving from the well-intentioned pile of unread NYers', BUT in general it's still worth remembering how insanely valuable subscribing to the magazine is when compared to buying a newsstand copy. like forty bucks, for a year, for it to be mailed to your house, which is the cost of like seven newsstand issues.

schlump, Monday, 10 January 2011 11:53 (seven years ago) Permalink

I wonder if it's a UK thing. Combative interviews with horrible people are more the norm here.

Chuck_Tatum, Tuesday, 4 September 2018 13:46 (three months ago) Permalink

well, look at cathy newman's jordan peterson interview for a good example of how that can backfire

my dream is to never be a champion (bizarro gazzara), Tuesday, 4 September 2018 13:59 (three months ago) Permalink

The goal should be akin to Errol Morris' "Mr. Death" movie - force a self-obsessed wannabe maestro rife with hubris and cynicism to find refuge with the only people that will pay his thoughts heed, and then let him and his ideas wither in exile.

...did you say this knowing, unmentioned, that he's the star of an upcoming Morris documentary? (I'm not convinced it's a good idea, either, and the TIFF program description for it is the opposite of tempting.)

wayne trotsky (Simon H.), Tuesday, 4 September 2018 14:03 (three months ago) Permalink

American Dharma, set to premiere Out of Competition at the Venice Film Festival on Tuesday, September 4, is an in-depth, often combative 95-minute interview with Bannon, structured around the subject’s favourite films, including Twelve O’clock High, Chimes At Midnight and The Bridge On The Review Kwai.

hm

Number None, Tuesday, 4 September 2018 14:08 (three months ago) Permalink

¿?

faculty w1fe (silby), Tuesday, 4 September 2018 14:09 (three months ago) Permalink

The Bridge On The Review Kwai

Neil S, Tuesday, 4 September 2018 14:12 (three months ago) Permalink

this is otm really

tbh i think the motivation behind nearly every bannon interview since he's left office has been mostly based on ego/wanting to be the guy who finally nails him, which... is not how the far right works

— Ashley Feinberg (@ashleyfeinberg) September 4, 2018

aloha darkness my old friend (katherine), Tuesday, 4 September 2018 14:15 (three months ago) Permalink

yeah, precisely

my dream is to never be a champion (bizarro gazzara), Tuesday, 4 September 2018 14:17 (three months ago) Permalink

Any publicity is good publicity for a POS who's been clinging to the fringes for forever and could die in deserved obscurity if we'd had the good sense to have never acknowledged them in the first place.

Digital Squirts (Old Lunch), Tuesday, 4 September 2018 14:20 (three months ago) Permalink

xpost I had no idea he was the subject of a Morris doc! I want to hear him hold forth on literally nothing, so ... pass.

Josh in Chicago, Tuesday, 4 September 2018 14:28 (three months ago) Permalink

I get what Feinberg's saying, but I don't really understand why interviewing is incompatible with "how the far right works", or even what that means

I mean, is it the same as saying "journalism doesn't work any more, forget it"?

Chuck_Tatum, Tuesday, 4 September 2018 14:52 (three months ago) Permalink

That's partly the point I made upthread: a lot of my reporter friends were puzzled about the outrage. The only argument that made headway was when I reminded them that Bannon is hemorrhaging readers and is no longer in the White House.

The Silky Veils of Alfred (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Tuesday, 4 September 2018 14:55 (three months ago) Permalink

the trap that a lot of well-meaning people fall into when it comes to debating fascists is assuming that both sides will act in good faith and present their ideas honestly and therefore the fascist will be defeated by facts

that's not how far right discourse works; it's pointless trying to hold them to those standards

the sartre quote about anti-semitism that's been doing the rounds kinda sums it up

“Never believe that anti-Semites are completely unaware of the absurdity of their replies. They know that their remarks are frivolous, open to challenge. But they are amusing themselves, for it is their adversary who is obliged to use words responsibly, since he believes in words. The anti-Semites have the right to play. They even like to play with discourse for, by giving ridiculous reasons, they discredit the seriousness of their interlocutors. They delight in acting in bad faith, since they seek not to persuade by sound argument but to intimidate and disconcert. If you press them too closely, they will abruptly fall silent, loftily indicating by some phrase that the time for argument is past.”

my dream is to never be a champion (bizarro gazzara), Tuesday, 4 September 2018 14:59 (three months ago) Permalink

Man Sartre otm

cheese is the teacher, ham is the preacher (Jon not Jon), Tuesday, 4 September 2018 15:14 (three months ago) Permalink

I get that, but why should journalist's only interview people we expect to reply in good faith? I don't think Remnick's that stupid to expect good faith ("Bannon's not going to burst into tears").

I mean, even though he's no longer in the White House, he's been a key influence on one of the most nihilistic and destructive government's of my lifetime - and he's not as smart as he thinks he is. There's a chance, worth risking I think, that he could reveal something (consciously or unconsciously) that's useful. Or put his foot in it in a way that's unhelpful to the right.

Chuck_Tatum, Tuesday, 4 September 2018 15:27 (three months ago) Permalink

(I wouldn't make the same case about Milo or Cernovich)

Chuck_Tatum, Tuesday, 4 September 2018 15:28 (three months ago) Permalink

useful to whom? for what purpose?

my dream is to never be a champion (bizarro gazzara), Tuesday, 4 September 2018 15:31 (three months ago) Permalink

I get that, but why should journalist's only interview people we expect to reply in good faith?

that's a good point, when it applies to interviewing people who haven't lived public lives and whose views are relatively unknown.

that doesn't apply to bannon. we know what he thinks. he still lives a very public life. he has plenty of other forums to share his interesting views about how we're already in the midst of world war III with islam. remnick is very unlikely to draw out new information that will somehow be the key to the entire current nightmare. as others have said, remnick and bannon are playing different games.

Karl Malone, Tuesday, 4 September 2018 15:36 (three months ago) Permalink

karl otm

my dream is to never be a champion (bizarro gazzara), Tuesday, 4 September 2018 15:37 (three months ago) Permalink

(xpost) I guess - some motivational insight into the way things worked at the White House, of which people were previously unaware?

This is a good point tho

As for "combative" -- yes, I totally believe that an editor who allowed a fact-checker to quit because he was terrified of alt right Twitter knows how to go toe-to-toe.

— Laura Lippman (@LauraMLippman) September 3, 2018

Chuck_Tatum, Tuesday, 4 September 2018 15:38 (three months ago) Permalink

some motivational insight into the way things worked at the White House, of which people were previously unaware?

this is the leakiest white house in history and, again, bannon has no obligation or likely any motivation to offer an accurate account of how things worked during his time there

my dream is to never be a champion (bizarro gazzara), Tuesday, 4 September 2018 15:43 (three months ago) Permalink

actually the point of a festival of ideas is for rich jerkoffs to feel cerebral while bigtimers like you rake in money https://t.co/PQAh09j8Z0

— Owen Ellickson (@onlxn) September 4, 2018

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 4 September 2018 16:39 (three months ago) Permalink

there's a lot of things I want to call Malcom Gladwell

faculty w1fe (silby), Tuesday, 4 September 2018 16:40 (three months ago) Permalink

there's a difference between a standard interview and a prestige interview, virtually always some level of puff piece even if the subject is repulsive by the nature of the beast.

aloha darkness my old friend (katherine), Tuesday, 4 September 2018 16:43 (three months ago) Permalink

The only valid argument I can think of for inviting Steve Bannon as a featured guest at some big public conference is if there's like a dermatological panel on the hazards of poor self-care where he just stands there shirtless as experts point out all of the ways your skin can rebel against you.

Digital Squirts (Old Lunch), Tuesday, 4 September 2018 16:46 (three months ago) Permalink

Just imagine the Sisyphean task of Bannon removing all of his shirts.

Digital Squirts (Old Lunch), Tuesday, 4 September 2018 16:56 (three months ago) Permalink

lol

David Remnick is no longer the editor of The New Yorker. Twitter is, writes @BretStephensNYT. https://t.co/8vk8DiguQl

— NYT Opinion (@nytopinion) September 4, 2018

The Silky Veils of Alfred (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 00:28 (three months ago) Permalink

gtfo lol

faculty w1fe (silby), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 00:30 (three months ago) Permalink

another fine instance of "Twitter" almost always being a dog whistle for "social justice warriors"

aloha darkness my old friend (katherine), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 01:45 (three months ago) Permalink

(as in, whenever someone blames Twitter for something, and it isn't about nazis, that's what they're blaming)

aloha darkness my old friend (katherine), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 01:46 (three months ago) Permalink

can twitter take bret stephens' job too? that would be nice.

Arch Bacon (rushomancy), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 02:08 (three months ago) Permalink

festivals and conferences are times when a profession gets to restate and redefine who they are, who's in the club, what their focus is, etc. - i'd even argue that is their point, above any actual information that gets shared (who actually ends up reading thru any of those presentations afterwards?)

illegal economic migration (Tracer Hand), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 08:51 (three months ago) Permalink

anyway my point being that remnick appears to not understand what these sorts of fests are for

illegal economic migration (Tracer Hand), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 08:52 (three months ago) Permalink

When the New Yorker Festival started, it was just about the music, maaan. Being with friends out in the woods and discovering new bands. Then came the drugs and the costumes and the wacky flags and shit.

Moves like Javert (Ye Mad Puffin), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 10:02 (three months ago) Permalink

festivals and conferences are times when a profession gets to restate and redefine who they are, who's in the club, what their focus is, etc. - i'd even argue that is their point, above any actual information that gets shared (who actually ends up reading thru any of those presentations afterwards?)


Can you write a piece on this and publish it somewhere that’s not ILX because I need to cite it in a future presentation

Paleo Weltschmerz (El Tomboto), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 11:59 (three months ago) Permalink

in the future citing ilx will be best practice

mark s, Wednesday, 5 September 2018 12:00 (three months ago) Permalink

NYT Business section today calls the NYer Fest "fantasy camp for liberals"

Roger Stone has appeared in the past

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 14:12 (three months ago) Permalink

the past, where roger stone belongs

my dream is to never be a champion (bizarro gazzara), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 14:15 (three months ago) Permalink

I don’t read tons of film reviews so my basis for comparison is limited but my god could anyone be more of a useless bore than Anthony Lane?

faculty w1fe (silby), Saturday, 8 September 2018 01:46 (three months ago) Permalink

Like where does he get off using all these fucking similes in a 700 word movie review

faculty w1fe (silby), Saturday, 8 September 2018 01:53 (three months ago) Permalink

P.G. Wodehouse wannabe

Josefa, Saturday, 8 September 2018 02:04 (three months ago) Permalink

one month passes...

is there a way to download the audio of the magazine articles onto my phone? I can’t figure out a way to downlod the audio from the NYer app, and apparently I have to pay to use audim

k3vin k., Tuesday, 23 October 2018 22:54 (one month ago) Permalink

There was an interesting article about color and sculpture in the NY Review also a few months ago:

https://www.nybooks.com/articles/2018/07/19/sculpture-bodies-spitting-image/

o. nate, Wednesday, 24 October 2018 21:20 (one month ago) Permalink

one month passes...

I think Patricia Marx has justified her whole shtick with the robot piece in 11/26

I have measured out my life in coffee shop loyalty cards (silby), Tuesday, 27 November 2018 04:27 (one week ago) Permalink

If they offered a subscription with just archival issues every week, I would sign up.z

o. nate, Friday, 30 November 2018 16:10 (one week ago) Permalink

it would be awesome to be able to access the archives without using that lame viewer

President Keyes, Friday, 30 November 2018 16:29 (one week ago) Permalink

I actually have the complete archives on DVD thing, though god knows if it still works on a modern OS. Having a curated selection each week in print would be worth paying for IMO.

o. nate, Friday, 30 November 2018 16:34 (one week ago) Permalink


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