Hendrix: Classic or Dud?

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Is he the foremost guitar virtuoso or just someone aurally masturbating. Personally, I'd go with the latter. Just because someone can play the guitar well, or even with their teeth, does not mean they have a talent for making good music, does it? (These appears to be the points most often put in Jimi's defence.)

Bill

Bill, Friday, 15 June 2001 00:00 (seventeen years ago) Permalink

hendrix has a permanent booking in the hotel of dud. there are very little music that can make me grind my teeth in irritation quite the way hendrix does.

hendrix is the polar opposite of everything i like.

so, that'd be dud then.

gareth, Friday, 15 June 2001 00:00 (seventeen years ago) Permalink

Dearie me. Sorry but go back and listen to the entire Hendrix back catalogue. Twelve times.

Venga, Friday, 15 June 2001 00:00 (seventeen years ago) Permalink

Not the 'foremost guitar virtuoso'(I don't believe that's what he intended to be - if he had, he would've been a bit more anal- retentive about li'l things like tuning, etc), and a really terrible lyricist, but people who use the term 'aurally masturbating' to describe any passage that is sans vocal for more than 10 seconds usually are incapable of seeing music as anything beyond air conditioning. Classic for "Third Stone From the Sun" (levez-vous your skinny arms toward heaven and space rock), "Are You Experienced" (they call it acieed), "EXP" (invents the Butthole Surfers)

tarden, Friday, 15 June 2001 00:00 (seventeen years ago) Permalink

Superbly put, Tarden.

The hippy-dippy side of Hendrix tends to obscure the latent punk agg of his best work - he was one ANGRY cat a lot of the time, and for good reason. Shapiro and Glebbeek's 'Electric Gypsy' biog is poorly written but still sad, painful reading - it's hard to think of a major artist who was more misunderstood/misrepresented than Hendrix, and the terrible racism he encountered would've left anybody fuming. Listen to 'The Smashing of the Amps' on David Toop's 'Guitars on Mars' comp, the two version of 'Driving South' on the BBC session disc or (more obviously) 'The Star-Spangled Banner' from 'Woodstock' to hear Hendrix creating noise-rock years before (whoever).

Andrew L, Friday, 15 June 2001 00:00 (seventeen years ago) Permalink

Mmm, how odd, i always find out that Hendrix is Total Classic (tm) when I try to say different. Still if you go behind the opressive Marley-like more-icon-than-actual-music-value you find some gems. Like the afformentioned '3rd Rock from the Sun', that live version of 'Machine Gun'(although that song is more about the uzi-like drumming) and of course "1983 (A Merman...)", still he greatest moment, the "Rock around the clock" of Oceanic Rock, yeah? Notice also how restrained himself there, don't really care for his, wanking on fire solo's.

Omar, Friday, 15 June 2001 00:00 (seventeen years ago) Permalink

Hendrix also = pioneer of sound-as-sound (in a rock context) as opposed to sound-as-vehicle. The Who and the Beach Boys might of been chipping away at this but Hendrix knocked the wall down, for better or worse. I'd hold Hendrix ultimately responsible for IDM, not for Savoy Brown and Rory Gallagher.

tarden, Friday, 15 June 2001 00:00 (seventeen years ago) Permalink

As he said to afternoon-talk-show-host Dick Cavett re "Star-Spangled Banner" - "See, I thought it was beautiful." Big detournement, at the time.

tarden, Friday, 15 June 2001 00:00 (seventeen years ago) Permalink

Totally agree abt sound-as-thing inventions. Classic, because: he was obsessed w/ living underwater. Obsessed. Which is somehow part of the great sadness of the man.

Tracer Hand, Friday, 15 June 2001 00:00 (seventeen years ago) Permalink

"obsessed w/ living underwater": never thought abt this before... Gimme more, Tracer, so I can chase it up and use it.

mark s, Friday, 15 June 2001 00:00 (seventeen years ago) Permalink

* From "1983: A Merman I Should Turn to Be:"

Well, it's too bad the machine that we built would never save us
that's what they say
That's why they ain't comin' with us today
And they also said 'It's impossible for a man to live and breathe underwater forever',
was a main complaint (too bad)


and also

So my love catherina and me
decide to take our last walk through the noise to the sea
Not to die but to be re-born, away from a life so battered and torn.... forever...


* "Bold as Love":

Blue are the life-giving waters taken for granted,
They quietly understand


* "Moon Turn the Tides":

So down and down and down and down
And down and down we go
Hurry my darling we mustn't be late
For the show
Neptune champion games to an aqua
World is so very dear
Right this way smiles a mermaid
I can hear and man is full of cheer.

* "Power of Love":

Yeah, but that old jellyfish
been floatin' around so long
Lord, he ain't got a bone
in his jelly back
Floatin' everyday and every night
Ridin' high is a risk
Sometimes the wind ain't right


Identifying with jellyfish but aspiring to be a merman away from a life "so tattered and torn." After visiting several Hendrix websites to find these lyrics I think I deserve some sort of Purple Heart.

Tracer Hand, Friday, 15 June 2001 00:00 (seventeen years ago) Permalink

Dangit. :(

Tracer Hand, Friday, 15 June 2001 00:00 (seventeen years ago) Permalink

From another ng I frequent:

"Who is the Jimi Hendrix of vocalists?" "Peter Hammill." "Who is the Noel Redding of vocalists?" "Jimi Hendrix."

Joe, Saturday, 16 June 2001 00:00 (seventeen years ago) Permalink

A comparison to Bill Haley as a *compliment*, Omar :) ?

I feel about Hendrix as Chuck D felt about Elvis, I guess ...

Robin Carmody, Saturday, 16 June 2001 00:00 (seventeen years ago) Permalink

You feel that Jimi Hendrix is a "straight up racist [...] simple and plain", Robin ?

What stamps does he appear on anyway ?

Patrick, Saturday, 16 June 2001 00:00 (seventeen years ago) Permalink

No, not at all. Just the "hero to most ... never meant shit to me" bit.

Robin Carmody, Saturday, 16 June 2001 00:00 (seventeen years ago) Permalink

2-5 minutes of brilliance per album does not a total classic make. "the star-spangled banner" is, however, so utterly classic that it nearly justifies all the boredom on electric ladyland. and he gets serious points for setting a guitar on fire. and the fashion statement. oh hell, if the fucker hadn't been so deified i'd call him classic just for those.

sundar subramanian, Sunday, 17 June 2001 00:00 (seventeen years ago) Permalink

Hendrix's long guitar solos aren't what do it for me..its the sheer fluidity with which he plays...effortlessly combining lead and rhythm and the occasional "huh"...listening ,you know he was born to do it..I probably sound like an ad for nike but nevertheless..forget the fucken academics,the offianados...and all you fucken music know it alls...

if you can just get your mind together.........................."

sara Lee, Sunday, 17 June 2001 00:00 (seventeen years ago) Permalink

I had this argument long ago with someone when we were discussing Hendrix v. Clapton. I always felt that Hendrix had no range in that he was always going at peak volume, full tilt, cram as much shit into a bridge as he could. Clapton had his lo-fi setting (that has unfortunately taken hold of ALL of his playing). There is something to be said for knowing when to hold back and when to let go. Not a dud, but not the best.

JM, Monday, 18 June 2001 00:00 (seventeen years ago) Permalink

the folks at the top who say Jimi was a dud are in fact duds themselves. While he was a brilliant, exciting guitar player, he was also a singer and songwriter, a fact overlooked by many... check out 'castles made of sand.' I went to his grave awhile back, and it's suprisingly free of trash and clutter... quite tidy, in fact, unlike Mr. Morrison's digs.

andy, Monday, 18 June 2001 00:00 (seventeen years ago) Permalink

I suppose judging dead rock stars' worth by how tidy their graves are is as good a yardstick as any.

Nick, Monday, 18 June 2001 00:00 (seventeen years ago) Permalink

Yardstick? Broom.

Tracer Hand's well-documented argument re. marine imagery is lovely. Marine imagery is a valuable resource in pop. I also recall Reynolds saying that 'Feel like I'm living in the bottom of a grave' was the forerunner of 'I Know It's Over'.

I like Hendrix a lot. I like 'guitar heroes' and 'virtuosity'; or at least, some of the instances of those things. All-time favourite Hendrix tracks, possibly: the cover of 'Day Tripper', and the extraordinary scorching fast blues of 'Driving South', on the BBC sessions.

the pinefox, Friday, 22 June 2001 00:00 (seventeen years ago) Permalink

three months pass...
Hendrix was, simply, an excellent guitarist and songwriter. His singing wasn't half bad, as well -- generally unremarkable, but he occasionally could dredge up some real fire, like on "One Rainy Wish" or "Voodoo Chile (Slight Return)." As for whoever posted those silly song lyrics; that's like posting some of Dylan's sillier lyrics (from one of his classic albums). I'm not saying that Hendrix was a great lyricist like Dylan; I am saying that you're totally missing the point.

Jack Redelfs, Sunday, 23 September 2001 00:00 (seventeen years ago) Permalink

Hey Mr Defensive-all-of-a-Sudden: I asked Tracer to post those lyrics cuz I wanted to check out the claim that JH "wished we lived underwater", so he did.

mark s, Sunday, 23 September 2001 00:00 (seventeen years ago) Permalink

Ah, but has Dylan ever expressed the desire to be a subaquatic creature?

Billy Dods, Sunday, 23 September 2001 00:00 (seventeen years ago) Permalink

ten months pass...
Here it is guys: Hendrix is a one off. No one that good will ever pick up a guitar again. I read a few of the remarks on this board and the one at the top has got to be a joke. If you're into music or have ever picked up a guitar then you cannot fail to realise Hendrix is the apex of the guitar art.

It's problematic because EVERYBODY thinks he's a don and it's been said so many times it's boring. I know man, everyone goes on about it... But if you put on his albums and listen to every little fucking thing the guy does then it's actually physically impossible to deny the man his due as the best. Ever. Will ever be. If you wanna disagree then a: you are wrong b: you are missing something c: you have no soul.

I'd like to play devil's advocat here and slate the man but you just can't do it. He plays the guitar not like he was born to but like God put another son together and thought "fuck all that religion shit, this one's gonna rock."

And Jimi does rock. Fuck that shit about lyrics, sure Dylan, Lennon, Morrison and even Jagger rip him up there and plenty more, but in terms of making that six stringer sing like a mother fucker, like no could make it sing before or has done since, Hendrix is God. The lyrics don't count here guys, hello. That's not what it's about.

To try to pretend anything else is crap and if you don't believe it, go to any his albums 5 times in succession, so you get into it and start tripping on the same vibe as Jimi. The guy is untouchable. So fucking cool it hurts and out there, and I mean properly out there.

Vai and all the rest of those souless technicalistas might play faster. But they cant write a tune for shit. Jimi, like I said at the start, is a once ever phenomenon.

Roger Fascist, Friday, 26 July 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

I'm new enough here not to know whether that Roger Fascist one was serious or not.

Ray M, Friday, 26 July 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

He seemed pretty intense about the Stones as well. Maybe it's David Fricke posting under his 'punk' psuedonym.

Ned Raggett, Friday, 26 July 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

ha ha. jimi = classic. that "god put another son together" line = classic, for other reasons tho.

dyson, Friday, 26 July 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

bizarro thread - especially for Gareth's post. Gareth, don't you see that some Hendrix tunes are 60's close counterparts to classic Hardcore/Drum & Bass? "Third Stone From The Sun", "Voodoo Chile", "In From The Storm", etc - these have much in common with "Open Your Mind", "Warpdrive", "Angel", etc. 4 Hero's concern & range in particular remind me of Hendrix. but also check side 3 of Electric Ladyland = "Inner City Life/Timeless". even on a thematic level - "Fire" ... "You Got Me Burning Up", "Purple Haze" ... "Weird Energy", "Manic Depression" & "I Don't Live Today" vs. darkside, etc. I realise this is hardly exacting, but I doubt I'm the only one who hears the parallels.

also see Beatles - "Tomorrow Never Knows", "Strawberry Fields Forever", "I Am The Walrus", etc as both formally & often thematically similar to continuum & multisectional 90's dance tracks (plus their 80's predecessors - Chicago, Detroit, NY, UK, Euro etc). this probably belongs on a 90's dance classics thread, though...

Paul, Friday, 26 July 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

Go Paul.

Jimi=greatest rock improv musician. Evah.

Ben Williams, Friday, 26 July 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

I have found it supremely hard to separate him from his cult.

Ned Raggett, Friday, 26 July 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

What cult?

Ben Williams, Friday, 26 July 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

Well, c'mon Ben, you just posted something that sorta summed it up! ;-)

Ned Raggett, Friday, 26 July 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

Oh, I see. Saying someone's really good=cult. Uh-huh.

Ben Williams, Friday, 26 July 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

Ben, read what you wrote again! "Best ever." --> no use in listening to any other guitarist cause you'd know, in your heart of hearts, that they weren't as good. So repeat the frozen text, replay the cadaver. Re-animate that undead vinyl entombed in its cardboard coffin...

Tracer Hand, Friday, 26 July 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

I don't see it that way at all. I don't have to listen to what I consider to be the best all the time, and considering something to be the best doesn't make everything else irrelevant. Sure, all around, he's my favorite--I love the blues and I love abstract sound, and I don't think anybody put those two things together like he did. But there are plenty of guitarists I like other than Jimi. Sometimes I'd rather listen to them than him. And when I do listen to him, I'm not replaying a "frozen text"--quite the opposite. I'm hearing something I didn't catch before, or catching something I did hear in a different way. That's one reason why he's great.

Ben Williams, Friday, 26 July 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

I think the fact that Hendrix gets so much love from the frat boys and Paul Allen's of the world causes him to sometimes get short shrift from the hipsters and cognoscenti. In terms of his impact on the music itself, his importance and influence dwarfs that of the Velvet Underground, for example. So why is it that no one ever questions the Velvet's place in the rock canon, but Hendrix is routinely dismissed?

o. nate, Friday, 26 July 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

Nate calls it wisely, of course, and Ben makes a good point -- he's listening to Hendrix the same way I listen to a certain Mr. Shields. ;-) My problem is that there's that suffocating sense -- not merely from the fratboys and Allens, but built into however 'rock' is considered as a whole, sometimes from critics, sometimes from musicians, sometimes from the business -- that there was but one golden age and certain musicians in it were its prophets. Thus my kicking against the 'best ever' line -- not that I doubt that's what you think, Ben, but I've just heard it so often from so many different sources with little extra to say about it that my own viewpoint (summed up: some good songs, he's NICE and all, that's about it) has to fight to get heard. It's also why Roger Fascist's take is so cartoonish -- THAT is the cult and then some, some pop messiah vision little different from any number of celebrations of people from Sinatra to Britney, but here made grotesque because of its link to The Canon (you might think Hendrix is being dismissed from it, Nate, but I think it's perfectly clear exactly how locked in he is from the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame to the endless reissues to the EMP). If Fascist is serious, he doesn't realize exactly how funny he is.

Paul's take is interesting because a dead Hendrix is so convenient in ways for projection (not that Paul himself is necessarily doing that, it was more the music being compared that struck me). He'd be a jazz visionary, he'd be a dance music maven, he'd be a synthesizist of musics all around the world -- I've heard all these kinds of takes and more over time, and I have to wonder if this isn't so much an attempt to celebrate Hendrix as it is to claim some sort of justification for what one likes oneself using him as a role model for what 'might' have happened. The possibility that he might have turned up like Eric Clapton, say, is often overlooked -- and as much as we might claim he wouldn't, we can't prove it.

Ned Raggett, Friday, 26 July 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

I wouldn't go so far as to easy Hendrix's influence dwarfs that of VU's. I think they created a band template that anyone could and did follow--Hendrix is more of an idiosyncratic one-off. Sure, he changed the way people play guitar, but almost anyone who copied him directly sounds stupid. There are a lot of elements to his music--the pseudo-poetic lyricism, the mostly crappy bandmates, the utter dominance of the guitar--that can't really be assimiliated outside of his immediate context (but these elements are also what make him much more interesting than someone who could assimilate the way he changed guitar playing, like Stevie Ray Vaughn).

Ben Williams, Friday, 26 July 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

I don't think Paul is saying "Hendrix would be a dance music maven if he was still alive"--he's pointing to things that are objectively present in the music he made while he was alive. He was a jazz player (that's why I called him rock's greatest improviser), he did synthesize a lot of different traditions (although I think American, not global, ones), and his use of the studio as an instrument did anticipate electronic dance music to some degree. You don't have to project anything to hear that.

Ben Williams, Friday, 26 July 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

Also, the endlessly-repeated (outside of this discussion, I mean) canon argument basically comes down to "I'm so tired of hearing people say x". Not good enough. (Neither is falling back on the old trash the listener's motives line, either). Either explain why that thing that you're tired of hearing people say is wrong (without simply saying "x sucks"), or offer an alternative, more compelling interpretation.

Ben Williams, Friday, 26 July 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

I don't think Paul is really saying that either (note paranthetical comment above ;-)), but what I've described *is* something I've read/heard/encountered from others. Regardless of what objectively happened or not, end results can often be a bit forced into the frame, often very conveniently so when the earlier figure is conveniently dead or disconnected from the rest of the world, and thus is easier to do the projecting with. Kraftwerk refers to the Beach Boys via "Autobahn" = the Beach Boys invent synth-pop? Using a studio as instrument wasn't only being done by Hendrix, and that isn't the whole part of what's going into electronic dance music (though you do note it's only a matter of degree anyway). Again, I just have this slight unease with all the hosannas, as if there's a validation to be gained specifically BECAUSE it's Hendrix and not someone or anyone else. And to return to Tracer's point a bit back there, all 'best ever' statement are ultimately or should ultimately be conditional -- the day I hear something that transfixes me as much as "Soon" did, then I'll say so, and I have no problem with that. To say that Mr. Shields was the best ever in something and then have done with it just feels weird -- I know what works for me, but I'm not about to quantify that for anyone else other than me! :-)

Ned Raggett, Friday, 26 July 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

I wouldn't go so far as to easy Hendrix's influence dwarfs that of VU's. I think they created a band template that anyone could and did follow--Hendrix is more of an idiosyncratic one-off. Sure, he changed the way people play guitar, but almost anyone who copied him directly sounds stupid.

What was the band template that the Velvet's created? A quartet with guitar, bass, and drums? They were hardly the first band with that line-up. Whether people copied Hendrix directly or indirectly, he changed the way that people thought about the electric guitar as an instrument. And more than any other artist, he ensured that the electric guitar would remain the central instrument of rock music for generations to come. I can't think of anything the Velvet's did of comparable significance.

o. nate, Friday, 26 July 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

Either explain why that thing that you're tired of hearing people say is wrong (without simply saying "x sucks")

It's not wrong per se if they're saying it for themselves -- which they are (one hopes! -- though one wonders the questions about canonicity that goes on in an individual commentator's head, cf Roger Ebert's comment on how he usually says when asked that Citizen Kane is the greatest American film but does so less than because he believes it on all fronts but because it's a convenient and understandable choice). Stepping outside themselves to say it's the same for me as well before I've had the chance to say anything or presuming I will say nothing on the matter in response = sucks. But this is just me being the radical subjectivist again, which shouldn't surprise anyone here. ;-)

or offer an alternative, more compelling interpretation

I'm not entirely sure of what you're getting ahead here, I admit.

Ned Raggett, Friday, 26 July 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

I can't think of anything the Velvet's did of comparable significance.

Why, they made sunglasses and dark clothes look good. Though to be sure Roy Orbison already had them beat.

Actually, I sorta think that it IS the fact that he helped make the electric guitar still the obsessive focus of rock music as conceived that might explain my unease as well -- is there any particular reason why that should have been the case, why it needed to be 'ensured'?

Ned Raggett, Friday, 26 July 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

getting ahead here

'ahead' = 'at.' MY BRAIN HURTS!

Ned Raggett, Friday, 26 July 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

(I should say that I personally like Hendrix much more than VU)

Template created by VU=classic pop song structure vs. abstract noise.

Kraftwerk-->Beach Boys. Uh, what?

Yes, yes, feel free to append "this is just my humble opinion and god forbid I would suggest that anyone else in the world might feel the same way" to everything I say if it makes you feel better.

Ben Williams, Friday, 26 July 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

Actually, don't feel free to append that. I wouldn't bother saying something if I didn't think it might be relevant to someone other than myself.

Ben Williams, Friday, 26 July 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

I apologize, Ben, but here, let me give an oversimplified context on where I'm coming from:

MUCH OF THE WORLD OVER TIME: "Hendrix, the tragically cut short legend, the greatest guitarist ever, the master visionary of rock and roll, etc. etc."

YOUNGER ME: "Mm."

(eventually hears songs along the way, some of the albums, etc.)

YOUNGER ME: "Huh. Er, okay. Some good songs, yes."

(relistens over time)

NOT-AS-YOUNGER ME: "Well, you know, I can see more where others were listening in but still, I don't really want to listen to any of this all that much..."

(more or less the present day)

MUCH OF THE WORLD OVER TIME: "Hendrix, the tragically cut short legend, the greatest guitarist ever, the master visionary of rock and roll, etc. etc."

ME NOW: "Mm."

Ned Raggett, Friday, 26 July 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

hendrix's voice is one of my favorite things about his records. you've got this huge, overwhelming noise -- even the softer hendrix performances are somehow loud -- and right in the middle of it you've got this spacey stoner drawl. he goes quiet where another singer would scream and races his way through lines that most singers would linger over. sometimes he sounds droll and sometimes he sounds like he's in awe, like he can't help standing back from this incredible sound he and his band are making and shaking his head at it. i'm especially fond of the way he sings 'hey joe,' where he just hangs back for most of the performance, playing it cool, letting the band build up momentum behind him, until suddenly he just comes out with 'I SHOT HER!!!'

(The Other) J.D. (J.D.), Friday, 30 November 2012 01:17 (five years ago) Permalink

The craziest thing about Hendrix is all his music was done in 3 or 4 years at the most.

kornrulez6969, Friday, 30 November 2012 03:10 (five years ago) Permalink

Am I the only one in here who really likes his lyrics and voice?
Not mad about most of the lyrics but yeah the voice is a big part of the appeal for me.

Ain't Too Proud To Neg (Mr Andy M), Friday, 30 November 2012 07:36 (five years ago) Permalink

Pleased to see the love for Burning Of The Midnight Lamp itt.

Ain't Too Proud To Neg (Mr Andy M), Friday, 30 November 2012 07:38 (five years ago) Permalink

"I motioned him to come over and witness what was happening. He took a look and then went back into the squad bay and started working again."

HA!

The Jupiter 8 (Turrican), Friday, 30 November 2012 22:25 (five years ago) Permalink

man, the army is so lame, you have to write a statement every time you see a guy masturbating?

tylerw, Friday, 30 November 2012 22:27 (five years ago) Permalink

'Don't Ask, Don't Tell, Just Fill Out Form AR 190-45'

Paul McCartney, the Gary Barlow of The Beatles (snoball), Friday, 30 November 2012 22:35 (five years ago) Permalink

i wonder if when hendrix became famous, sgt private james mattox would tell everyone at the bar that he saw that guy jerking it.

tylerw, Friday, 30 November 2012 22:37 (five years ago) Permalink

'Can You See Me (Jerking It In A Cubicle)?'
'I Don't Jerk Today'
'Third Cubicle From The Sun'
'The Wind Cries "Hendrix! Stop jerking it in a cubicle!"'
'Ain't No Jerking'
'You Got Me Jerking'
'Rainy Day, Jerk Away'
'Still Raining, Still Jerking'

Paul McCartney, the Gary Barlow of The Beatles (snoball), Friday, 30 November 2012 22:42 (five years ago) Permalink

Axis Of Jizz: Bold As Self-Love

The Jupiter 8 (Turrican), Friday, 30 November 2012 22:44 (five years ago) Permalink

i wonder if when hendrix became famous, sgt private james mattox would tell everyone at the bar that he saw that guy jerking it.

― tylerw, Friday, November 30, 2012 5:37 PM (7 minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

"I knew he was left handed before I ever saw the guy play guitar!"

trinidad jokes (some dude), Friday, 30 November 2012 22:45 (five years ago) Permalink

Are You Experienced (In The Art Of The Hand Shandy)?

The Jupiter 8 (Turrican), Friday, 30 November 2012 22:46 (five years ago) Permalink

"Hey James, Where You Goin' With Yo Cock In Your Hand..."

The Jupiter 8 (Turrican), Friday, 30 November 2012 22:50 (five years ago) Permalink

Hey Jim/Where you goin' with your dick in your hand?

Faster than food (Myonga Vön Bontee), Friday, 30 November 2012 22:53 (five years ago) Permalink

xpost!

Faster than food (Myonga Vön Bontee), Friday, 30 November 2012 22:53 (five years ago) Permalink

Hahahahahaha! Priceless! :D

The Jupiter 8 (Turrican), Friday, 30 November 2012 22:54 (five years ago) Permalink

New album of previously unreleased leftovers called People, Hell & Angels coming in March; Amazon has the following rundown:

Earth Blues: Totally unlike the version first issued as part of Rainbow Bridge in 1971, this December 19, 1969 master take features just Hendrix, Cox and Miles—stripped down funk at its very origin.

Somewhere: This newly discovered gem was recorded in March 1968 and features Buddy Miles on drums and Stephen Stills on bass. Entirely different from any previous version fans have heard.

Hear My Train A Comin’: This superb recording was drawn from Jimi’s first ever recording session with Billy Cox & Buddy Miles—the rhythm section with whom he would later record the groundbreaking album Band Of Gypsys.

Bleeding Heart: This Elmore James masterwork had long been a favorite of Jimi’s. Recorded at the same May 1969 session as “Hear My Train A Coming,” Jimi had a firm understanding of the arrangement and tempo he desired. Before they began, Jimi instructed Cox and Miles that he wanted to establish a totally different beat than the standard arrangement. He then kicked off this amazing rendition unlike any other he had ever attempted.

Let Me Move You: In March 1969, Jimi reached back to another old friend, saxophonist Lonnie Youngblood. Before he was discovered by Chas Chandler in the summer of 1966, Jimi had contributed guitar for Youngblood and such infectious rhythm and blues styled singles such as “Soul Food”.

This March 1969 session features Hendrix and Youngblood trading licks on this never before heard, high velocity rock and soul classic.

Izabella: In the aftermath of the Woodstock festival, Jimi gathered his new ensemble, Gypsy Sun & Rainbows at the Hit Factory in August 1969 with engineer Eddie Kramer. “Izabella” had been one of the new songs the guitarist introduced at the Woodstock festival and Jimi was eager to perfect a studio version. This new version is markedly different from the Band Of Gypsys 45 rpm single master issued by Reprise Records in 1970 and features Larry Lee, Jimi’s old friend on rhythm guitar.

Easy Blues: An edited extract of this gorgeous, free flowing instrumental was briefly issued as part of the long out of print, 1981 album Nine To The Universe. Now nearly twice as long, fans can enjoy the dramatic interplay between Jimi, second guitarist Larry Lee, Billy Cox and drummer Mitch Mitchell.

Crash Landing: Perhaps known as the title song for the controversial 1975 album that featured Hendrix master recordings posthumously overdubbed by session musicians, this April 1969 original recording has never been heard before. Jimi is joined here by Billy Cox and drummer Rocky Isaac of the Cherry People to record this thinly veiled warning to his girlfriend Devon Wilson.

Inside Out: Jimi was fascinated by the rhythm pattern which would ultimately take form as “Ezy Ryder”. Joined here by Mitch Mitchell, Jimi recorded all of the bass and guitar parts for this fascinating song--including a dramatic lead guitar part amplified through a Leslie organ speaker.

Hey Gypsy Boy: The roots of Jimi’s majestic “Hey Baby (New Rising Sun)” trace themselves to this March 1969 recording. Unlike the posthumously overdubbed version briefly issued as part of Midnight Lightning in 1975, this is original recording that features Jimi joined by Buddy Miles.

Mojo Man: Jimi lends a hand to Albert & Arthur Allen, the vocalists known as the Ghetto Fighters, whom he had befriended in Harlem long before he achieved fame with the Experience. When the two recorded this inspired, previously unreleased master at the legendary Fame Studios in Muscle Shoals, Alabama they took it back to Hendrix at Electric Lady Studios. Jimi knew just what to do to elevate the recording beyond contemporary R & B to the new hybrid of rock, rhythm and blues he was celebrated for.

Villanova Junction Blues: Long before his famous performance of this song at Woodstock, Jimi recorded this studio version with Billy Cox and Buddy Miles at the same May 1969 session which yielded “Hear My Train A Comin’” and “Bleeding Heart” also featured on this album. Never fully finished, the song stands as an example of the fertile ideas he hoped to harness.

誤訳侮辱, Saturday, 1 December 2012 00:13 (five years ago) Permalink

Hmm, this looks pretty good...lotsa stuff I knew existed & wanted to hear for awhile, like the sessions with Larry Lee and the embryonic Band of Gypsys recordings. Not crazy about the album title though - the title's Hendrix's, the song selection sure isn't.

Faster than food (Myonga Vön Bontee), Tuesday, 4 December 2012 17:07 (five years ago) Permalink

five months pass...

1989 Noel Redding letter about the Experience -- poor guy went broke and stopped playing altogether for a time, barely seeing any royalties from Hendrix records.

Tarfumes The Escape Goat, Monday, 13 May 2013 20:37 (five years ago) Permalink

Redding's autobiography ('Are you experienced?: the inside story of the Jimi Hendrix Experience') is excellent.

go cray cray on my lobster soufflé (snoball), Monday, 13 May 2013 20:49 (five years ago) Permalink

my favourite hendrix song was the result of hendrix sacking redding and doing the bass himself. poor bastard

have a nice Blog (imago), Monday, 13 May 2013 20:50 (five years ago) Permalink

Ooh, found Redding's autobio to be pretty bitter and whiney imho

media conglomerates are pedaling the same product (stevie), Tuesday, 14 May 2013 06:50 (five years ago) Permalink

three weeks pass...

Fall, barometric pressure, just don't fall on me. :(

_Rudipherous_, Monday, 10 June 2013 23:16 (five years ago) Permalink

four months pass...

Enjoyed the American Masters episode last night. Hearing Hendrix speak was somewhat new to me. Sure would loved to have seen those first few Monkees shows.

clemenza, Wednesday, 6 November 2013 15:44 (four years ago) Permalink

Missed the first hour of it, enjoyed the 2nd hour.

curmudgeon, Wednesday, 6 November 2013 15:47 (four years ago) Permalink

four years pass...

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/2/2f/JHendrix_Lifelines.jpg

This collection of Hendrix from 1990 has to be the only collection of it's type that has a narration that goes along with song choices? There has to be toher classical, folk music or jazz music collections that has an audio narrative that goes along with the audio tracks, but I don't know of any. You will often see interview segments added as bonus tracks discussing the album or selection, but that is a different thing than what this Lifelines box set did.

I seem to recall hearing this documentary on the radio as I think they syndicated it out. It wasn't nearly as ubiquitous as that Beatles history radio show, but I am sure the popularity of that one may be why they tried it with the Hendrix material.

earlnash, Sunday, 31 December 2017 12:56 (eight months ago) Permalink

I have the Motown Story box somewhere, where various characters involved in the Motown, um, story, introduce various Motown cornerstones.

"Taste's very strange!" (stevie), Monday, 1 January 2018 12:33 (eight months ago) Permalink

"the eternal myth revealed, vol. 1" is a 14-cd sun ra set with the same approach

bob lefse (rushomancy), Monday, 1 January 2018 14:38 (eight months ago) Permalink

Also the Library of Congress recordings by Jelly Roll Morton.

mirostones, Monday, 1 January 2018 18:12 (eight months ago) Permalink

Also: postage stamps!

_Rudipherous_, Monday, 1 January 2018 18:16 (eight months ago) Permalink

Man those are some far out stamps

mirostones, Monday, 1 January 2018 18:35 (eight months ago) Permalink

Yeah, I always keep those stamps handy, for special friends only.
Amazon description of new collection coming out on March, usual three formats. Re this being in a "trilogy", I enjoyed the first two volumes mentioned here, so looking fwd:

Both Sides Of The Sky presents 13 studio recordings including 10 which have never before been released. All but two of these studio recordings were made during a fertile period between January 1968 and 1970. Jimi's mastery and use of the studio as a proving ground for new songs resulted in a growing collection of extraordinary material. This album completes a trilogy of albums [with Valleys Of Neptune and People, Hell & Angels] presenting the best and most significant unissued studio recordings remaining in the Hendrix archive. The songs include fascinating alternate versions of "Stepping Stone," "Lover Man" and "Hear My Train A Comin'" as well as recordings where Jimi is joined by special guests Johnny Winter and Stephen Stills. Both Sides Of The Sky was mixed by Eddie Kramer, the engineer for all of Hendrix's albums throughout the guitarist's lifetime, and produced by Janie Hendrix, Kramer and John McDermott.

Mannish Boy - The first ever studio session by the group Hendrix would christen as his Band Of Gypsys. Hendrix, Cox & Miles shared a love for the blues as this driving, uptempo reworking of "Mannish Boy" by Muddy Waters makes clear.

Lover Man - Just two weeks before their triumphant New Year's concerts at the Fillmore East in NYC [yielding both 1970's Band Of Gypsys and 2016's sequel Machine Gun], Hendrix gathered with Cox and Miles to cut this dynamic rendition of what had become a favorite concert staple.

Stepping Stone - A totally unique take on this Hendrix favorite, with Jimi showcasing both blues and country styled licks atop a relentless, galloping beat.

$20 Fine -Stephen Stills joined Jimi, Mitch Mitchell and Buddy Miles Express keyboardist Duane Hitchings at this September 1969 session. With Stephen handling lead vocals and organ, Jimi added multiple guitar parts to this rollicking Stills original.

Power Of Soul - This 1970 studio session came three weeks after the Band Of Gypsys concerts at the Fillmore East. While a live version remains one of the highpoints of Band Of Gypsys, Jimi never released a studio version during his lifetime. For this album, we present the mix that Hendrix and Kramer prepared of the complete song at Electric Lady on August 22, 1970.

Jungle - The influence of Curtis Mayfield can be heard here as Jimi expands on the "Villanova Junction Blues" theme he made famous by its inclusion in the 1970 Woodstock documentary.

Things I Used To Do - Jimi is joined for this rendition of Guitar Slim's blues classic by Johnny Winter. Jimi's trademark guitar work and Winter's deft slide playing weaves in and around the foundation set by bassist Billy Cox and Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young drummer Dallas Taylor.

Georgia Blues - Jimi reunited with some old friends from his pre-Experience days. Lonnie Youngblood, with whom Hendrix played in R&B groups like Curtis Knight & The Squires, voiced this superb twelve bar blues neatly underpinned by Hendrix's sublime rhythm and lead guitar work.

Sweet Angel - With Axis: Bold As Love only just released, Jimi immediately turned his focus to recording what would become Electric Ladyland. This gorgeous, instrumental reading of "Angel,", features Jimi on guitar, bass and vibraphone joined by Mitch Mitchell.

Woodstock - Stephen Stills came to this session fresh from having visited Joni Mitchell, who had a new song that Stills was excited to try and record. Long before CSNY's version, Stephen, Jimi and Buddy Miles recorded this amazing rendition.

Send My Love To Linda - A superb new Hendrix original composition recorded with Cox and Miles in the aftermath of their successful Band Of Gypsys performances at the Fillmore East.

Cherokee Mist - Together with drummer Mitch Mitchell, Jimi created this moody, evocative original complete with his playing of a sitar to complement his traditional electric guitar.

Product details

Audio CD (March 9, 2018)
Number of Discs: 1
Label: LEGACY

dow, Monday, 1 January 2018 20:25 (eight months ago) Permalink

holy crap

illegal economic migration (Tracer Hand), Monday, 1 January 2018 20:27 (eight months ago) Permalink

I liked Valleys of Neptune but the tracks on People, Hell & Angels were a little too raw; they basically felt like demos a lot of the time, missing the professional mixes, extra layers of guitar, etc. that finished pieces would have had. Looking forward to this one, though.

grawlix (unperson), Monday, 1 January 2018 20:46 (eight months ago) Permalink

i do have to wonder.. what's taken them this long, if the stuff's any good?

illegal economic migration (Tracer Hand), Monday, 1 January 2018 20:53 (eight months ago) Permalink

i do have to wonder.. what's taken them this long, if the stuff's any good?

― illegal economic migration (Tracer Hand)

first off, there's stuff that's obviously being held back so as not to saturate the market ... hendrix fanatics have been clamoring for the "black gold" tape of acoustic songs for ages, but it's still being held back... second off is that once you quit the alan douglas approach of overdubbing obviously unfinished recordings, your alternate approach is to edit together various takes of unfinished recordings... which takes a hell of a lot of time. also, just finding the best stuff takes time, because hendrix recorded basically everything, much of which was not that great. kind of interested to hear what they're going to come up with for "send my love to linda", which is a song that had a lot of potential that was worked on during a number of sessions but not really completed.

and possibly it is specialist stuff. possibly "valleys of neptune" isn't that great a song, but i like it and i'm glad they finally managed to get the tapes into a shape where a releasable song came out of it.

bob lefse (rushomancy), Monday, 1 January 2018 21:31 (eight months ago) Permalink

That Sun Ra box set sounds like an interesting listen.

earlnash, Monday, 1 January 2018 23:57 (eight months ago) Permalink

i once dreamed that i had found a bootleg of a jimi hendrix - roland kirk live session

illegal economic migration (Tracer Hand), Monday, 1 January 2018 23:59 (eight months ago) Permalink

"That Sun Ra box set sounds like an interesting listen.

― earlnash"

it is!

"i once dreamed that i had found a bootleg of a jimi hendrix - roland kirk live session

― illegal economic migration (Tracer Hand)"

there should have been one... hendrix was a roland kirk fan.

bob lefse (rushomancy), Tuesday, 2 January 2018 01:03 (eight months ago) Permalink

The only jazz muso I've found him jamming with (if this is indeed the participants claimed, and the guitars sound plausible enough; harder to tell about bass and drums), via recent email to a friend:
Oh yeah, may be old hat to you, but recently came across Jimi and McLaughlin jamming: first number is prob "Drivin' South", second might be "Everything's Gonna Be Alright", third is just Ye Olde British-American Blooze, but a spirited shuffle, not too bad of its kind, with Buddy Miles and Dave Holland mostly providing a metronome throughout this extended coffee break https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ki5AfK0sFrs Overall, pretty cool!

dow, Tuesday, 2 January 2018 02:51 (eight months ago) Permalink

As far as the purported trilogy goes, of course it is and is gonna be odds and sods; in his case, I don't mind hearing it all, whether I ever get around to a Best of The Rest folder or not.

dow, Tuesday, 2 January 2018 02:55 (eight months ago) Permalink

The confusing release/re-release/reconfiguration/deletion etc. at least partially comes down to whichever heir has most recently grabbed the wheel; xgau's site is fairly helpful in sorting out a fair amount of all this stuff; I don't always agree with his (sometimes very brief)takes on the music of course, but he's made a good-faith effort.

dow, Tuesday, 2 January 2018 03:00 (eight months ago) Permalink

the hendrix/mclaughlin jam is crap. his jam with khalid of space is far preferable.

bob lefse (rushomancy), Tuesday, 2 January 2018 03:21 (eight months ago) Permalink

Speaking of jamming with jazz players, yes how the hell could I forget Khalid/Larry Young, who played on Nine To The Universe?

dow, Tuesday, 2 January 2018 03:34 (eight months ago) Permalink

This collection of Hendrix from 1990 has to be the only collection of it's type that has a narration that goes along with song choices?

― earlnash

just today i have been listening to the archival release from the avandaro festival which has armando molina doing the same thing. wild shit, btw.

bob lefse (rushomancy), Thursday, 4 January 2018 01:28 (eight months ago) Permalink

For as many times as those later Hendrix recordings have been released, I'm kinda thinking the first two still might be the best ones with The Cry of Love and Rainbow Bridge.

Other than that you got the live shows and there are a few of them that are really worth hearing. Some of the later shows when his band was more of a looser conglomeration probably would benefit being curated down.

earlnash, Thursday, 4 January 2018 01:56 (eight months ago) Permalink

Yeah Cry of Love and Rainbow Bridge were two of the earliest and best (RB finally on CD a few years ago). Also, Hendrix In The West, released in '72 I think, was a party favorite of my gang. Band of Gypsies was different, really groove-strict here, cutting loose(r) there---both suiting the mood and vibe of wartime---but the much later Band of Gypsies 2 was more fluid overall, without getting too loose. Also liked Live At Winterland, Woodstock, Blues, Radio One, among other concert albums, but some of them were expanded later, maybe too much so, at least for home alone non-stoned listening

dow, Thursday, 4 January 2018 15:52 (eight months ago) Permalink

(Well Radio One wasn't a "concert album", it was his BBC sessions, along with the sequel, BBC Sessions.)

dow, Thursday, 4 January 2018 15:55 (eight months ago) Permalink


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