pitchfork is dumb (#34985859340293849494 in a series.)

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Donald
Oh my God, what just happened at P-Fork
Mon Apr 1 07:08:25 2002
63.167.209.146

I'm not going to spew any elitist bullshit, but Alanis Morrissette, Kylie Minogue? Oh my fucking God. I'll stay for a little while to see if P-Fork still serves my needs, but with today's front page, I'm not counting on it. I understand the career move, but I just don't think it's going to serve me any more.

jess, Monday, 1 April 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

stu Re: Oh my God, what just happened at P-Fork Mon Apr 1 07:41:08 2002 65.92.243.96

I wonder if it's going to serve anyone's needs. I don't think a web- only publication can attract readers interested in Alanis Morissette and Kylie Minogue. To my knowledge, no one actually hunts down information about such artists. People just hear about it on tv and that's it. Let's give Pitchfork a few months, until the corporate contributors pull the plug.

Mitch Lastnamewithheld, Monday, 1 April 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

I am very disappointed. Could they have made it any more obvious? COME ON, PEOPLE.

David Raposa, Monday, 1 April 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

I don't think a web- only publication can attract readers interested in Alanis Morissette and Kylie Minogue.

QUOTE OF THE YEAR.

jess, Monday, 1 April 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

What makes me think that things will be back to normal by tomorrow? ;)

Sean Carruthers, Monday, 1 April 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

I don't know Sean... it would be April 2nd, which would make it one day after...

Andy K, Monday, 1 April 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

You scalawags, you make me laff. Perhaps.

Ned Raggett, Monday, 1 April 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

Speaking of which, HEY NED! My Bloody Valentine are finally releasing their new album!

Sean Carruthers, Monday, 1 April 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

We thought about that as one of the news items.

Dare, Monday, 1 April 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

"i for one will not be returning to this site if you're seriously going to be reviewing alanis. like i can't read that shit everywhere and anywhere? the reason i had pitchfork as my home page was because i could actually find out about the shit i care about. i'm glad you can pay your rent now, it's too bad that you sold out your millions of readers for britney fans in body glitter to do it."

Dare, Monday, 1 April 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

pitchfork as your homepage, classic or dud?

the first thing i thought (after, well, this is no all cure all the time) was that i wished they really had "sold out" (what the fuck, is this 93?), because maybe it would mean LESS GODDAMN PROG.

jess, Monday, 1 April 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

he's calling you out, leone. FITE!

Todd Burns, Monday, 1 April 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

I think I'd rather read about Alanis and Kylie than most of the stuff they normally review.

Sean, Monday, 1 April 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

Their funniest joke came months ago.

Nicole, Monday, 1 April 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

I don't know what all you fools are talking about... I only WISH all of it were true.

Well, the Albini thing practically is...

mr. sparkle, Monday, 1 April 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

We thought about that as one of the news items.

Makes sense, really.

Ned Raggett, Monday, 1 April 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

I don't know what all you fools are talking about... I only WISH all of it were true.

Well, the Albini thing practically is... huh???

Brock K., Monday, 1 April 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

LESS GODDAMN PROG

So, does that mean we'll write about the next Radiohead album, or not?

dleone, Monday, 1 April 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

And that Flaming Lips thing actually is true. I think.

powertonevolume, Monday, 1 April 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

Hein? Is the joke that Pitchfork reviewed some pop musik?? Even their KYLIE review was as dull as www.defra.gov.uk/farm/sustain/default.htm ARRRGHHHHHHHHH!! Then again Pitchfork = dull is a big shocker along the lines of Nelson in COLUMN!!!!!! shocker.

Sarah, Tuesday, 2 April 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

'On' column? 'HAS' column?! I can see him from my bladdy window but does that help my BRANE I think NICHT.

Sarah, Tuesday, 2 April 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

Dom, how much of the Kylie review was farce? "The song exudes a catchiness that belies its inherent simplicity, so reassuring during an era when chart acts sound increasingly baroque and producers race to see who can ape electronic music trends first" sounds at least semi-serious.

Mitch Lastnamewithheld, Tuesday, 2 April 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

that is because kylie is, like sophie ellis bextor, going for a retro- mancuso/levan vibe, with all the classicism inherent in such an endeavour.

gareth, Tuesday, 2 April 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

Actually, I did try to write about that record in the same way I would have for anything else at Pitchfork. I thought the gag would be better if people really thought we were changing styles, and Spin may be full of ads, but at least the reviews aren't jokes! As far as I know, anyway. Dullness wasn't intentional though.

dleone, Tuesday, 2 April 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

best e-mail address ever, eh starbar?

dudley, Tuesday, 2 April 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

Dead right sir. Power shandies all round to the geezer behind it eh?

Sarah, Wednesday, 3 April 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

From: DWilliams@EQRWORLD.com Subject: NO, Just Admit You Like It Up There

You have completed your learning of life's lessons. Now, you suck ass just like all the other bores before you. Kylie, Alanis? Whatever, bitch. I am sure you already have the defense mechanisms in place so, this will mean nothing but, another exercise in...oh, who cares. Looking elsewhere for reality...or maybe I can pretend to be a rubber worm like pitchwhore.com...here big fishie, look, I rounded 'em up for you in a arrel. A whole demographic!

Not Funny

Dare, Thursday, 4 April 2002 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

five years pass...

Y'know sometimes they really are asking for it:

"White Williams issues a debut album layered with impeccable influences-- including Roxy Music, Beck, and T. Rex-- and a sense of calculated disaffection."

Well shit SIGN ME UP.

lukas, Thursday, 1 November 2007 18:57 (ten years ago) Permalink

Yeah, that was a bit of a repellant blurb if I ever saw one.

Z S, Thursday, 1 November 2007 19:01 (ten years ago) Permalink

Wait, are you saying that doesn't seem accurate?

nabisco, Thursday, 1 November 2007 19:10 (ten years ago) Permalink

I read 'White' as 'While' and thought "The Saul Williams album sounds like that?"

Ned Raggett, Thursday, 1 November 2007 19:11 (ten years ago) Permalink

it's more that they used that as their _hook_

x-post

lukas, Thursday, 1 November 2007 19:20 (ten years ago) Permalink

The front blurbs are always stripped/condensed summary descriptions from the review inside -- in this case

His songs are thin and languorous, with impeccable influences and the sort of calculated disaffection that comes from an MFA in design and a good weed connection.

nabisco, Thursday, 1 November 2007 19:46 (ten years ago) Permalink

omg that is horrorshow

The blurb >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> the article quote

HI DERE, Thursday, 1 November 2007 20:18 (ten years ago) Permalink

I assume that's an article quote; nabisco, if you just made that up then SHAME ON YOU.

HI DERE, Thursday, 1 November 2007 20:22 (ten years ago) Permalink

why would a critic ever try to guess where a song comes from?

Mr. Que, Thursday, 1 November 2007 20:23 (ten years ago) Permalink

I'm more bothered by beck as impeccable influence

dmr, Thursday, 1 November 2007 20:24 (ten years ago) Permalink

Wait, are you saying that doesn't seem accurate?

The description of "a sense of calculated disaffection", a combination of words that makes me imagine the shittiest band of all time, followed by "recommended" was repellant for me. I guess I like my disaffection to be natural, not carefully planned, so I would never recommend something like that.

Then again, I've never heard it so what do I know and so on.

Z S, Thursday, 1 November 2007 20:29 (ten years ago) Permalink

b-but someone at pfork said "hm, how can we get people to read this review? I know! we'll mention the artist's impeccable influences and calculated disaffection! that'll reel 'em in!"

RIP satire etc

lukas, Thursday, 1 November 2007 20:34 (ten years ago) Permalink

they could have collaged+mis-used _anything_ from the article, and they collaged+mis-used that

lukas, Thursday, 1 November 2007 20:35 (ten years ago) Permalink

The White Williams album reminds me much more of late 10cc and Bread than of Roxy Music. That bit was like the classic "Let's over-hip our influences" review.

I eat cannibals, Thursday, 1 November 2007 20:54 (ten years ago) Permalink

The description of "a sense of calculated disaffection", a combination of words that makes me imagine the shittiest band of all time, followed by "recommended" was repellant for me.

See, this sounds like the blurb WORKED for you -- i.e., efficiently let you know you would probably not like this act.

I agree, though, it looks kind of weird to have such a neutral-to-disparaging summary blurb on a recommended album.

nabisco, Thursday, 1 November 2007 22:04 (ten years ago) Permalink

I like how they gave the new Babyshambles, which is actually tuneful and a good all around album, a 4.0, but gave the first one, which is dreadful and hard to listen to / bloated, a 7.3,

Yeah, it was definitely TWICE as good as the new one. Fuckin' morons.

Erock Zombie, Friday, 2 November 2007 18:30 (ten years ago) Permalink

ugh, "impeccable influences" is really repulsive.

Hurting 2, Friday, 2 November 2007 18:46 (ten years ago) Permalink

(xpost) was that a parody or are you really getting worked up about an internet score for babyshambles

dmr, Friday, 2 November 2007 18:47 (ten years ago) Permalink

He was worked up?

roxymuzak, Friday, 2 November 2007 18:49 (ten years ago) Permalink

wait, i thought the grading scale was logarithmic. like 5 is twice as good as 4. somebody email ryan schreiber to find out.

elan, Friday, 2 November 2007 19:14 (ten years ago) Permalink

shit, now i need to reevaluate all my purchases of the last five years.

elan, Friday, 2 November 2007 19:16 (ten years ago) Permalink

It's actually modelled after the Richter Scale, hence the superlative designations of various well-reviewed albums as either "Reccomended," "Best New Music," or "Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On."

Alex in Baltimore, Friday, 2 November 2007 19:24 (ten years ago) Permalink

xp not sure it's that controversial, I never revisit them and don't particularly like the authenticity schtick, but at the time I did and they were important to me (I would retell a story I'd read somewhere about how Rubin would push Cash to rehearse the songs again and again until he truly understood them and could deliver them authentically)

niels, Sunday, 8 April 2018 14:21 (two weeks ago) Permalink

I love appraisals structured around ambivalence.

― morning wood truancy (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Sunday, April 8, 2018 7:17 AM (five minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

just kinda sounds like he doesn’t know what to say throughout

flamenco drop (BradNelson), Sunday, 8 April 2018 14:22 (two weeks ago) Permalink

lol anyway i don’t know why this is bothering me so much so i’ll stop

flamenco drop (BradNelson), Sunday, 8 April 2018 14:23 (two weeks ago) Permalink

Beethoven began his career in 1795 and had a hit in 1976

absorbed carol channing's powers & psyche (morrisp), Sunday, 8 April 2018 14:59 (two weeks ago) Permalink

The Man Comes Around is probably the true late-career Cash classic. Plus he wrote it himself iirc?

omar little, Sunday, 8 April 2018 15:04 (two weeks ago) Permalink

Cash is my least favorite of the classic country giants, so I have little invested in preserving his mythos. The best of the American Recordings is the second, thanks to the Heartbreakers imo. Kaleb Horton otm about the inappositeness of the Danzig and Depeche Mode covers.

morning wood truancy (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Sunday, 8 April 2018 15:08 (two weeks ago) Permalink

I’m not huge into Cash either, my entire collection of his music is comprised of Live at Folsom Prison (genuinely great) and the song he sings on Zooropa.

I think post-Folsom and pre-Rubin his career has tons of corn, lots of it bad corn (some great, like that U2 collab.)

omar little, Sunday, 8 April 2018 15:15 (two weeks ago) Permalink

(fwiw I wrote my comment before reading the review, it sure looks silly now that the entire review is about that)

aloha darkness my old friend (katherine), Sunday, 8 April 2018 15:35 (two weeks ago) Permalink

There are like 10 million Johnny Cash records, and save the Sun stuff and the live albums most are just ... Johnny Cash records. I do really like most of the Rubin records, though, for getting rid of the glop, getting tasteful, tactful players in there and doing such a good job honing in on the man's huge voice and personality. I do think too many of the songs are hokey square peg/round hole fits - for every Hurt or Rusty Cage there's a Personal Jesus or something dopey like that - but there are plenty of great country songs (like Sea of Heartbreak) he absolutely nails amidst the contemporary hookups, and there are a lot more of those country/folk/gospel songs than there are those novelty pairings.

My favorite story of those sessions, by the way, was that supposedly Joe Strummer just showed up one day to watch and enjoy the experience, and basically stayed for days, sleeping on the studio floor.

Josh in Chicago, Sunday, 8 April 2018 15:41 (two weeks ago) Permalink

There are like 10 million Johnny Cash records, and save the Sun stuff and the live albums most are just ... Johnny Cash records

This statement is equally true of most of the classic country dudes. There are way, way too many Willie Nelson albums in the world. Same with Waylon Jennings, same with Merle Haggard (though Merle's catalog, overall, is way stronger than any of the others.)

Agree that the second Cash/Rubin album, the one where the Heartbreakers back him all the way through, is the keeper.

grawlix (unperson), Sunday, 8 April 2018 16:20 (two weeks ago) Permalink

I would retell a story I'd read somewhere about how Rubin would push Cash to rehearse the songs again and again until he truly understood them and could deliver them authentically

― niels, Sunday, April 8, 2018 10:21 AM (one hour ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

this is fascinating to me because the thing I dislike most about Johnny Cash's music is that it always sounds like he's not only reading the lyrics from a sheet of paper but also like he's reading them for the first time

Paul Ponzi, Sunday, 8 April 2018 16:22 (two weeks ago) Permalink

xp willie's made more good records than bad, and his good ones are masterpieces. Johnny Cash isn't in the same stratosphere. Willie is an artist, Cash is a cool guy with a cool voice who has made a thousand unlistenable gospel records and whose entire reputation rests on like seven good songs

Paul Ponzi, Sunday, 8 April 2018 16:24 (two weeks ago) Permalink

never heard the story about rubin trying out having the rhcp back cash before, that sounds so bizarre

ufo, Sunday, 8 April 2018 16:39 (two weeks ago) Permalink

it worked for alanis

flamenco drop (BradNelson), Sunday, 8 April 2018 16:48 (two weeks ago) Permalink

I pitched Todd Burns on a feature for Stylus in the late aughts on Cash’s American Recordings era that he dug but I never actually delivered. So I was pleasantly surprised when this came across my Twitter feed this am (I follow Kaleb).

Anyway, I thought the piece was excellent – the ambivalence mentioned upthread was exactly what makes it interesting to me. I loved that he actually concluded that the record was important but not actually great (I’ve always struggled with getting through the whole thing myself). He had some inspired reasoning as to why – that some of the covers are poor fits, sure, but also that it’s virtually an a cappella record in a lot of ways (which he correctly notes made it more of a statement but also a bit of a slog).

In general, I prefer retrospectives that blend analysis with a bit of archaeology – and show their work when necessary. To that end, I enjoyed the slightly nonlinear take here on the competing histories and mythologies (i.e., the public history with Columbia and U2, but also the less well-known Branson debacle, etc.).

Ultimately pitchfork may be dumb but this was a great piece – one that could’ve been pretentious as fuck but wasn’t. Thankfully.

Naive Teen Idol, Sunday, 8 April 2018 16:55 (two weeks ago) Permalink

never heard the story about rubin trying out having the rhcp back cash before, that sounds so bizarre

Iirc Chili Drummer Chad plays on the Rubin-produced Dixie Chicks record. There's a similarly eclectic lineup backing Nanci Griffith on her album "Flyer" (which sort of fits in with the Cash and Emmylou Harris of the era as crossover/hipster resurgent). Flyer (produced by Peter Buck) has U2's rhythm section, some Peter Gabriel vets, Indigo Girls ... I love these sorts of hodge podge all-star session line-ups. Syd Straw's Surprise, that one features everyone from Eno to Van Dyke Parks to Bernie Worrell, though there is that Golden Palominos connection.

Josh in Chicago, Sunday, 8 April 2018 17:35 (two weeks ago) Permalink

hurt was on mtv a fair amount in the early 00s which i think counts

hah as if having your music video on MTV in the early 2000s (during the only non-reality-based programming slot from 5am-630am) counted for anything.

Hazy Maze Cave (Adam Bruneau), Sunday, 8 April 2018 19:59 (two weeks ago) Permalink

Cash is a cool guy with a cool voice who has made a thousand unlistenable gospel records and whose entire reputation rests on like seven good songs

yeah this is one of the dumbest takes ever and likely the audience pitchfork is writing for.

Hazy Maze Cave (Adam Bruneau), Sunday, 8 April 2018 20:03 (two weeks ago) Permalink

Was "Hurt" a "hit?" It was a "hit" video, but that's really not the same thing, is it?

― Josh in Chicago, Sunday, April 8, 2018 11:11 PM (yesterday)

pretty sure Johnny Cash was immortality cemented long before he did a NIN cover

― Hazy Maze Cave (Adam Bruneau), Sunday, April 8, 2018 11:15 PM (yesterday)

this is the exact opposite of the point Kaleb was making though

I found it charming but lol pitchfork the way Kaleb's eyes start darting around the room in panic when he has to try and mention non-outlaw-Americana musics. British punk musicians like... uh... Cabaret Voltaire and Voice Of The Beehive. Noted... uhhh... [misreads Less Than Zero sleeve] Public Enemy producer Rick Rubin. U2 - the very U2 who had, once, previously, made an album.

just noticed tears shaped like florida. (sic), Sunday, 8 April 2018 20:15 (two weeks ago) Permalink

it is always classic to see hipsters dismiss country or gospel, entire careers worth of music, because it doesnt fit some narrative, the last dregs of rockism. like i got news for you buddy, country music and gospel sells millions of records, it doesn't need punk rock cred to be relevant. it has been relevant for millions of people for decades.

Hazy Maze Cave (Adam Bruneau), Sunday, 8 April 2018 20:16 (two weeks ago) Permalink

Rubin is a miracle worker and he encourages Johnny Cash to make the best music of his life. This is the door Johnny Cash walks through to dethrone Hank Williams as the king of country music.

lol this is the stupidest fucking thing ive read in a long time

Hazy Maze Cave (Adam Bruneau), Sunday, 8 April 2018 20:21 (two weeks ago) Permalink

that's meant as a caricature of the standard narrative iirc

Hurt is by far his biggest hit on Spotify/Youtube btw

niels, Sunday, 8 April 2018 20:22 (two weeks ago) Permalink

Great job misreading the essay Adam, well done.

Ned Raggett, Sunday, 8 April 2018 20:24 (two weeks ago) Permalink

lol this is the stupidest fucking thing ive read in a long time

― Hazy Maze Cave (Adam Bruneau),

you realize he subverts this sentence with the following one, right?

Also, Kaleb Horton wrote some of the loveliest and most informed bits about Hag when he died in 2016.

morning wood truancy (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Sunday, 8 April 2018 20:24 (two weeks ago) Permalink

like, he's been steeped in country music longer than ten people on the Pitchfork masthead.

morning wood truancy (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Sunday, 8 April 2018 20:25 (two weeks ago) Permalink

The album is good, but more importantly, it’s a shrewd marketing idea.

pitchfork in a nutshell

Hazy Maze Cave (Adam Bruneau), Sunday, 8 April 2018 20:26 (two weeks ago) Permalink

the most important thing is narrative, music is afterthought

Hazy Maze Cave (Adam Bruneau), Sunday, 8 April 2018 20:26 (two weeks ago) Permalink

how're you doing in that hole you're digging for yourself?

morning wood truancy (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Sunday, 8 April 2018 20:28 (two weeks ago) Permalink

Before U2 and Rick Rubin, Johnny was covered by all kinds of cool people in the 80s and early 90s: Elvis Costello, Social Distortion, Nick Cave, Bongwater, The Mekons, Dead Moon, Blondie, Wall of Voodoo, Dwight Yoakum. The coolest rap record of the 80s, Three Feet High and Rising was named after a Cash line. He's sampled on Paul's Boutique too.

Whiney G. Weingarten, Sunday, 8 April 2018 20:33 (two weeks ago) Permalink

Xpost It went both ways, too, because not only was Johnny Cash covering Bruce Springsteen, he was covering Costello, he was covering Nick Lowe ...

Josh in Chicago, Sunday, 8 April 2018 21:14 (two weeks ago) Permalink

uh trl was still very much a thing in the early 00s? also “hurt” was up for video of the year and mtv still had shows like VIDEO CLASH and ALL THINGS ROCK on its schedule. but i’m sure you feel great about the exacta of being a dick and trotting out the “mtv doesn’t play videos” canard

maura, Monday, 9 April 2018 13:51 (one week ago) Permalink

Paul Ponzi is Shakey no?

droit au butt (Euler), Monday, 9 April 2018 13:58 (one week ago) Permalink

my three year old sings "Hurt" all the time, so it obviously connects with the younger demographic

President Keyes, Monday, 9 April 2018 14:00 (one week ago) Permalink

i dont think so xp

marcos, Monday, 9 April 2018 14:00 (one week ago) Permalink

ok kinda has the cadence but I dunno

droit au butt (Euler), Monday, 9 April 2018 14:01 (one week ago) Permalink

impossible to say for sure until paul ponzi comments on a celebrity death, really

star wars ep viii: the bay of porgs (bizarro gazzara), Monday, 9 April 2018 14:02 (one week ago) Permalink

My challop is that Johnny Cash is not the greatest country singer ever because...he's not really a country singer imo

please sign up for my webinar

The Desus & Mero Chain (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Monday, 9 April 2018 15:18 (one week ago) Permalink

in the same way that Bob Marley isn't the greatest reggae star i concur

vermicious kid (Noodle Vague), Monday, 9 April 2018 15:23 (one week ago) Permalink

was Jesus a Jew?

morning wood truancy (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 9 April 2018 15:27 (one week ago) Permalink

Cash the man was country. But he was maybe more a ... folk artist?

Josh in Chicago, Monday, 9 April 2018 16:00 (one week ago) Permalink

MTV showed videos until the mid-00s at least, and even then MTV2 was still showing like half videos.

flappy bird, Monday, 9 April 2018 16:26 (one week ago) Permalink

i remember watching MTV in 2003-2004 and seeing tons of videos during the afternoon.

omar little, Monday, 9 April 2018 16:29 (one week ago) Permalink

Cash the man was country. But he was maybe more a ... folk artist?

― Josh in Chicago, Monday, April 9, 2018 11:00 AM (one hour ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

yeah i mean like to me, stylistically most of his classic stuff is either really idiosyncratic rockabilly or basically folk music (ira hayes, man in black etc)...

he's really apart from i guess what i consider the main line of country descended from acuff/rose/hank sr/ernest tubb etc, whereas i feel like willie or merle or george jones are way more from that tradition of honky tonk

The Desus & Mero Chain (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Monday, 9 April 2018 17:10 (one week ago) Permalink

i think you trade in your "folk artist" card when they give you your own tv show

Hazy Maze Cave (Adam Bruneau), Tuesday, 10 April 2018 13:25 (one week ago) Permalink

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mVu78DSovhI

Josh in Chicago, Tuesday, 10 April 2018 13:30 (one week ago) Permalink

Honky Tonk is only one strain of country music though. (And Gospel is way more important in country than people like to admit.) Cash was accepted and influential within Country music. (Where do guys like Roger Miller and Marty Robbins and Merle Travis slot in, exactly?) As recently as 10 years ago you had Josh Turner rise to country stardom with a Cash throwback image and sound.

President Keyes, Tuesday, 10 April 2018 13:38 (one week ago) Permalink

stylistically most of his classic stuff is either really idiosyncratic rockabilly or basically folk music

Most of the classic Sun artists/recordings were 'marketed' as country, and recognised as such - rockabilly is really an after-the-fact genre, a bit like film noir. This is a good feature on Elvis' country roots, a lot of which equally applies to Cash:

http://www.elvis-history-blog.com/elvis-country-music.html

Ward Fowler, Tuesday, 10 April 2018 13:49 (one week ago) Permalink

I was thinking of checking out "Wild Wild Country" last night but haven't gotten around to it yet.

Today Pitchfork posted a headline about it and I no longer want to watch this show.

billstevejim, Friday, 13 April 2018 01:02 (one week ago) Permalink

It's pretty good, but not perfect. Check it out. There's a whole thread about it.

Mario Meatwagon (Moodles), Friday, 13 April 2018 03:02 (one week ago) Permalink


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