I want to stop screwing around and actually learn to play the guitar

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I can play your basic chords and mostly figure stuff out from tabs but I since I don't have to play every day I never get any further than this. I want to play more but it just feels so daunting.

Any advice or system to start actually learning to play the guitar instead of crudely copying other people's stuff? Is it just a matter of discipline and playing scales until something clicks?

joygoat, Wednesday, 3 February 2010 04:10 (eight years ago) Permalink

Crudely copying stuff will get you pretty damn far, actually! I could never do well with scales, but basic music theory, understanding chord progressions helped me a lot. Though I'm curious to what people who are actually disciplined at guitar would say.

Nhex, Wednesday, 3 February 2010 04:16 (eight years ago) Permalink

so funny you should start this thread. i've been taking classical guitar lessons for about four years now; just had another lesson tonight. but i still sputter through so much of it, i feel like i know next to nothing, and certainly nothing about how to play rock, jazz, or other (tr: non classical) styles.

Daniel, Esq., Wednesday, 3 February 2010 04:18 (eight years ago) Permalink

I'm not the chops-iest dude around, but I taught full-time for a couple of years. I think you need to come up with some specific goals, find the right teacher, and communicate those goals to your teacher. Also, learning some basic music theory and really understanding it and working to apply it to the fretboard goes a very long way to opening up your playing. All the scales and licks in the world don't matter if you don't understand how to use them. Start off with the lessons at http://musictheory.net to get some basics.

St3ve Go1db3rg, Wednesday, 3 February 2010 14:58 (eight years ago) Permalink

Feel like I should be doing this too. I've been playing guitar for 13 years but never seriously I just strum absent-mindedly on it every day or 2 for a bit. By this point I'm pretty comfortable playing chords/rhythm but I can't play solos/notes very well. In fact I never even learned to use a pick which probably doesn't help.

Colonel Poo, Wednesday, 3 February 2010 15:10 (eight years ago) Permalink

Just another personal observation from an amateur undisciplined guy, but deciding on a specific technique (fingerstyle) has given me some impetus that I didn't have before. Still copycatting/learning from tabs but I feel I'm actually getting somewhere now, like being able to play actual songs, instead of just bashing out chords to no real effect.

take me to your lemur (ledge), Wednesday, 3 February 2010 15:21 (eight years ago) Permalink

*watching this thread closely*

i'm bouncing around from book to book to website right now- playing with a few groups but i feel like the little kid who pretends to read a book out loud(play guitar) but is actually only reciting from memory...

best thing that recently happened to my guitar quest was Xmas- got pushed into learning songs everybody knows, so i actually had to run some specific chords and move my fingers around in new ways.

also, keeping the guitar out of the case was pretty crucial; if its locked up, i keep on paaassing it byyyyy (*pharcyde)- if its out, i pick it up

natlawdp, Wednesday, 3 February 2010 17:46 (eight years ago) Permalink

I have the opposite problem! I will see/hear some crazy guitar trick and wonder how they do that. I had like three actual guitar lessons ever and managed to coax the guy into showing me pinch harmonics on the second lesson and I could tell he felt he was doing me a great disservice.

What is it exactly that you want to be able to do? It seems to me that regular playing stuff seems way more figure-out-a-ble than the stupid screwing around guitar tricks. One thing I'd recommend over playing scales is learning a favorite song, then playing that song in different keys or on as many different starting notes as possible.

Philip Nunez, Wednesday, 3 February 2010 18:46 (eight years ago) Permalink

going to go with the totally pedantic answer here and say go get lessons. i mean take the time to find the right instructor, but it sounds like part of what you need here is the motivation to get disciplined about playing every day, and for most folks the only way that happens is if they have to go back and face somebody once a week and show "progress".

rhea perlman is "horrible" (jjjusten), Wednesday, 3 February 2010 18:50 (eight years ago) Permalink

I am not an amazing guitarist but what I would recommend is: 1) play guitar as often as you can, and 2) try to play with other people, even if they play other instruments.

congratulations (n/a), Wednesday, 3 February 2010 18:50 (eight years ago) Permalink

huge OTM to #2 there

rhea perlman is "horrible" (jjjusten), Wednesday, 3 February 2010 18:51 (eight years ago) Permalink

I keep my acoustic in the living room just hoping it'll force me to pick it up more but man it's hard sometimes especially when I don't feel like everything is ever improving.

The "pretend to read" think is pretty spot on - when I was playing a lot I never felt like I was doing anything other than that, like an actor "speaking" a foreign language in a movie by learning a phrase phonetically. I want to know why certain things sound good together, how to play in a particular key, what notes you can and can't play at certain times and so on. I want to know a little bit of theory, but I don't care about being able to site read or anything.

Playing with other people seems like it would be really helpful but it's hard for me to pull off - I know actually hardcore PhD music professors (oboe, cello, composition, etc) but no good guitar players. The cellist actually played bass in a crappy band we had a couple years ago (I faked the drums) and she was crazy - her pop music knowledge was slim but you could play her a song one time and she'd just play it back to you verbatim. She says that since she was a kid she's just "seen" music when she hears it and instantly knows everything about it. It's kind of amazing.

joygoat, Wednesday, 3 February 2010 19:04 (eight years ago) Permalink

"I want to know why certain things sound good together, how to play in a particular key, what notes you can and can't play at certain times and so on."

I have basically zero knowledge of music theory, but from this tabula rasa POV, you can figure out that what sounds "good" is a pattern, and so long as the notes follow a discernible pattern, they will sound "good"
For example, the basic "Louie Louie" chords sound "good" because there's both an ascending and descending pattern of notes that occur simultaneously, and they happen to occur in such a way that they harmonize, so it's a music equivalent of a pun.

Philip Nunez, Wednesday, 3 February 2010 19:28 (eight years ago) Permalink

"Louie Louie" is GGG CC DDD CC (repeat). Basically a 1-4-5 chord progression that then goes back on itself to get to the beginning again.

might seem normal (snoball), Wednesday, 3 February 2010 19:55 (eight years ago) Permalink

What I started off doing was learning the I-IV-V chords for several different keys (C, G, D, A, and E), and then gradually over time I (terrible phrase coming up) extended my dominion over the fretboard, by learning the chords in between.

might seem normal (snoball), Wednesday, 3 February 2010 19:57 (eight years ago) Permalink

Oh, and gradually patterns, particularly movable chord shapes, will begin to emerge. So instead of thinking "index finger on 1st fret of 1st and 2nd strings, ring finger on 2nd fret of 3rd string, little finger on 3rd fret of 4th string" you'll automatically think "that's F Major", then pretty soon you'll starting thinking things like "if I move that F Major up one fret, that's F#".

might seem normal (snoball), Wednesday, 3 February 2010 20:00 (eight years ago) Permalink

This might also help, as it can be printed out on a single sheet of paper instead of spread over dozens of page of a chord book.
http://www.castaliapub.com/guitar-keys.html

might seem normal (snoball), Wednesday, 3 February 2010 20:24 (eight years ago) Permalink

"Louie Louie" is GGG CC DDD CC
If you take the notes the chords are named after, that forms the ascending part of the pattern, but if you look at the other notes in the same chords,
there's also a descending DDD CC GGG CC. You can play those notes on a bass while someone plays guitar and they will sound "good" together.
These are also the opening chords for Sesame Street and Beat on the Brat I think, so it's extra good times?

Philip Nunez, Wednesday, 3 February 2010 20:29 (eight years ago) Permalink

I don't know when I started recognizing what specific notes I was playing and all that. Never had a lesson, but just knowing, like, this string is E, and if I put my finger here to tune it, that's A, and so on, I just gradually figured it out.

I'm considering paying for lessons lessons for the first time in my life* because I wanna get real about chicken pickin', and I do not know a single person who does that (i.e. the find a friend to play with technique is somewhat out--plus I moved away from my friends I play with). That and I need to learn to play lead shit over chord changes, I have never, never done that.

*(But LATER in life, when job+money happens)

Möbius dick (╓abies), Wednesday, 3 February 2010 20:34 (eight years ago) Permalink

Another interesting song to unravel is Link Wray's "Rumble", especially the little descending twelve solo which is (fanfare) the pentatonic scale in E.

might seem normal (snoball), Wednesday, 3 February 2010 20:44 (eight years ago) Permalink

Yeah IIRC you just start at G on the high E and do pulloffs straight down the scale until you hit bottom.

Möbius dick (╓abies), Wednesday, 3 February 2010 20:48 (eight years ago) Permalink

Not sure if this will format correctly but here goes...

-3-0---------------------
-----3-0-----------------
---------2-0-------------
-------------2-0---------
-----------------2-0-----
---------------------3-0-

might seem normal (snoball), Wednesday, 3 February 2010 20:53 (eight years ago) Permalink

Under the same principle as the ascending/descending patterns in louie louie, I bet you could reverse the direction of that solo so that it is ascending and it would sound OK.
(You'd have to start on a different note though.)
It seems to me that solo'ing is just a matter of getting from note a to note b, and there's a lot of wiggle room for you to do it -- as long as you hit those 'key frame' notes, the listener's brain will accept that it's conforming to some kind of pattern, even if it's a jumbled mess in between.
Take the one-note solo for "I Want to Be Sedated"
I bet you could improvise a credible solo variation using almost random notes so long as you returned to that one note periodically.
(Obviously, the more you can make it conform to a credible pattern, the "better" it will sound)

Philip Nunez, Wednesday, 3 February 2010 21:11 (eight years ago) Permalink

if you can't find other people, what i enjoy and think helps is having a multi track recorder (they are ridic cheap nowadays) that you can strum a chord progression onto and then play notes over top of that on another track trying to come up with what you might be hearing your head

voices from the manstep (brownie), Wednesday, 3 February 2010 21:21 (eight years ago) Permalink

in your head

voices from the manstep (brownie), Wednesday, 3 February 2010 21:21 (eight years ago) Permalink

lol Rumble is one of the songs I'm always playing on my guitar. I probably just need to learn some different songs, I'm always playing the same ones which is probably why I'm so slow to improve.

Colonel Poo, Thursday, 4 February 2010 09:42 (eight years ago) Permalink

Hey, do both!

Mark G, Thursday, 4 February 2010 11:14 (eight years ago) Permalink

joygoat- totally with you there, i've started to stop screwing around and actually learn as well!

80085 (a hoy hoy), Thursday, 4 February 2010 11:18 (eight years ago) Permalink

many of these tips focus on the work the left hand is doing. what fascinates me is the work the right hand is doing in terms of strumming technique, e.g., is the pattern all downstrums; how many strings are being struck on each pass (power-chords, for instance, only allow you to strum three strings, and sometimes you can't start on the low E, which sounds very hard!); the notion of palming or muting the strings; when do you alternate between full strums and picking individual notes; performing those precussive-knocks on the body of the guitar that's done in many latin-styles.

Daniel, Esq., Thursday, 4 February 2010 11:54 (eight years ago) Permalink

Sometimes I make the same vow as in the thread title. But sometimes I've worked at playing something from tab or whatever, and eventually I've got so I'm, you know, pretty sloppy but at least hitting most of the right notes. And I've felt proud, and I've moved on to a different song or just had a day off, and 2 days later I can't seem to play the first one at all. Muscle memory completely gone already.

Is this a normal stage which can be overcome, or is it a sign that guitars/music are not for me?

(I also totally can't recall how to play a song or even what it sounds like if a different song is in my head, so that's a big sign that playing live is always going to be out of the question, I think, but maybe someone else here can go "I used to be like that and now I am rocking stadia nightly")

canna kirk (a passing spacecadet), Thursday, 4 February 2010 12:39 (eight years ago) Permalink

My current guitar-improvement strategy is to learn Slayer songs from online tabs. I can't seem to get my head round solos from tabs though, not that I could play Slayer solos anyway.

Colonel Poo, Thursday, 4 February 2010 13:04 (eight years ago) Permalink

play w/ a drummmmmer. or someone singing or anything, I just know a drummer. I keep my guitar by the computer and pick it up when I get bored/internet crashes. also benefit from paying close attention to good guitar playing, youtube to infinity. I think focusing on little things and messing around w/ & enjoying things I've already learned, esp changing the rhythm, are key for me. playing everything extremely slowly&excellently.

ogmor, Thursday, 4 February 2010 13:17 (eight years ago) Permalink

learn the pentatonic scale. practice it over and over and over and over until your fingers move smoothly and you can do it without looking at the fret board. speed up and try alternating the note order. listen to your favourite song, find the root key, and jam along

anita bonghit (rionat), Thursday, 4 February 2010 14:20 (eight years ago) Permalink

Is this a normal stage which can be overcome

Yes, it's a normal phase that nearly everyone who plays an instrument has to go through. For me, the key was practising the instrument (keyboard) every day. Also the skill of remembering which notes/chords to play is transferable between instruments. When I started being more serious about playing guitar, I found that the practice I'd put in memorising songs on keyboards meant that I found learning guitar chord progressions straightforward.

might seem normal (snoball), Thursday, 4 February 2010 17:24 (eight years ago) Permalink

find the root key, and jam along

I guess to me this is where "learning to play the guitar" has actually already happened. Like if a song is just D, G, and C, what key is it in? will any note that's part of these chords or part of the D, G, and C major scales sound "good" if played at any particular point while these three chords are being played by another guitar?

joygoat, Thursday, 4 February 2010 17:25 (eight years ago) Permalink

Working out the key a song is in is usually a matter of looking at the chords and figuring out which key fits best. A song that uses just D, G, and C is probably going to be G Major, because those three chords are the Dominant (V), Sub-dominant (IV), and Tonic (I) chords of that key. Improvising a solo on top of those chords means playing notes that are in that key, which for G Major are G, A, B , C, D, E, and F#.

might seem normal (snoball), Thursday, 4 February 2010 17:54 (eight years ago) Permalink

^^^ whoops my grammar is a bit off there.
Also these things are not really strict rules, although they can get you in the ballpark. You can throw in notes that are not in that key. It's a matter of taste and personal preference.

might seem normal (snoball), Thursday, 4 February 2010 17:57 (eight years ago) Permalink

im going to be mr broken record here and say again - get lessons. i know its cooler to teach yerself, but thats what i did, and you know what? i regret not taking lessons at some point, a lot.

Jake Gyllenhaal needs more juggalo in it (jjjusten), Thursday, 4 February 2010 17:58 (eight years ago) Permalink

fwiw, learning music theory will likely be very helpful for figuring out which notes not in the key you can throw in where without being unnecessarily jarring, or conversely to be purposefully jarring

PIES! PIES! PIES! PIES! PIES! (HI DERE), Thursday, 4 February 2010 18:00 (eight years ago) Permalink

(xxxpost) arghhh made a mistake!
In G Major, D is the Dominant (V), G is the Tonic (I), and C is the Sub-dominant (IV).

(xpost) I agree with the need for lessons. It's a lot less frustrating to be able to ask a guitar tutor "hey what about this?" and get an answer in a couple of minutes, rather than search on the internet for hours and still not find out. Also having someone who'll give you an objective opinion of your playing is good - your own opinion will vary widely between "I'm great" and "I suck" to be any use.

might seem normal (snoball), Thursday, 4 February 2010 18:02 (eight years ago) Permalink

i will seek lessons... AND SCOTCH.

natlawdp, Thursday, 4 February 2010 18:27 (eight years ago) Permalink

"I've moved on to a different song or just had a day off, and 2 days later I can't seem to play the first one at all. Muscle memory completely gone already."
How different are these songs? I think there's a certain frame of mind where you notice you're doing the same thing in one song as in another song that really helps you remember how to do that part, and I think it's largely unconscious, so if you're very attentively following a tab, it might not stick?

Philip Nunez, Thursday, 4 February 2010 18:33 (eight years ago) Permalink

but tabs are only good for strumming the basic melody of a rock song, right? they're almost never giving you the individual notes played by the guitarist, or the solo patterns, and so forth . . .

Daniel, Esq., Thursday, 4 February 2010 18:34 (eight years ago) Permalink

http://www.beefheart.com/datharp/10com.htm

might seem normal (snoball), Thursday, 4 February 2010 18:35 (eight years ago) Permalink

no that is wrong, tabs show finger placement in respect to string and fret instead of musical notation.

┌∩┐(◕_◕)┌∩┐ (Steve Shasta), Thursday, 4 February 2010 18:35 (eight years ago) Permalink

I've got a really really shit Yamaha acoustic guitar which is nigh-on impossible to play, which I keep around all the time. It's great. I can barely hold a chord on it and now if I pick up a half-decent guitar I'm always amazed at how fluidly I can play.

dog latin, Thursday, 4 February 2010 18:37 (eight years ago) Permalink

Like if a song is just D, G, and C, what key is it in? will any note that's part of these chords or part of the D, G, and C major scales sound "good" if played at any particular point while these three chords are being played by another guitar?

As explained above, this particular example is easy as these three chords all fit into the key of G major. To answer a little more broadly, the way to figure this stuff out is to first learn what notes are in all of the major scales. I can explain that in detail if anyone is interested but it's pretty easy to find lessons on how it works.

Then to figure out which chords correspond to that major scale, you need to harmonize the scale; i.e., stack the notes of the scale on top of each other in thirds. The result is the same for every major scale, and it looks like this: I ii iii IV V vi viidim. So I IV and V are major, ii iii and vi are minor, and vi is diminished. Now you know all of the triads (three-note chords) that can be built using *only* the notes of a given key. These are the chords that are used most often in simple pieces of music.

So for instance, the A major scale goes A B C# D E F# G#. Applying the formula to that scale we get A Bm C#m D E F#m G#dim. Those are all the triads we can make in the key of A major that don't require borrowing any outside notes, aka accidentals. So if a chord progression goes e.g. A F#m Bm E, we could analyze that as a I vi ii V in the key of A.

In terms of playing a solo or writing a melody to fit those chords, the simplest thing to do is just think "I'm in A major" and use those notes in whatever way sounds good. But again to look at it a little more broadly, with any type of chord and melody note, there are two possibilities: the melody is a chord tone, meaning it's one of the notes that's also being played in the chord, or it's a non-chord tone. Chord tones will always be safe to use, generally sound solid and "inside," and can be held out. Non-chord tones are necessary to provide a sense of movement or tension, but generally have to resolve to chord tones.

So for instance, if I'm improvising over the above chord progression, and the current chord is A, C# is a chord tone, so I could hold that note over the chord. D, though, is not a chord tone, despite being a part of the scale. So if I'm playing a D over the A chord, it's not going to sound wrong, but if I hold that D out over the whole chord, as opposed to e.g. moving down to C# or up to E (both of which are in the A chord), it's going to sound dissonant and maybe wrong.

So it's all well and good to just take a scale and play it kind of randomly when you're starting out with improvising. But if you listen to a guitar solo by somebody like David Gilmour, the notes are chosen carefully to go with the chords -- he's moving through non-chord tones, but he lands on the chord tones on certain strong beats, providing resolution and dramatic effect. The solo in "Mother" is a great example of this.

St3ve Go1db3rg, Thursday, 4 February 2010 18:38 (eight years ago) Permalink

no that is wrong, tabs show finger placement in respect to string and fret instead of musical notation.

yeah, i actually knew that. i meant more along the lines of the tabs you see on websites diagraming rock songs, which seem to me -- like the chords above the lyrics -- more about the basic sound of the song, not the intricate notes being played by the guitarist

Daniel, Esq., Thursday, 4 February 2010 18:39 (eight years ago) Permalink

The result is the same for every major scale, and it looks like this: I ii iii IV V vi viidim. So I IV and V are major, ii iii and vi are minor, and vi is diminished.

Whoops, I meant vii is diminished. And if it wasn't clear I'm using roman numerals to correspond to each note in the scale, and major/minor scales have 7 notes.

St3ve Go1db3rg, Thursday, 4 February 2010 18:39 (eight years ago) Permalink

Ah, those are good. It is also touched on Moore, Allan. "The So-Called 'Flattened Seventh' in Rock". Popular Music. Vol. 14, No. 2 (May, 1995), pp. 185-201. Cambridge University Press.

My Body's Made of Crushed Little Evening Stars (Sund4r), Monday, 24 April 2017 16:13 (one year ago) Permalink

Ha, I bought his book during the heyday of those discussions and he mentions that paper several times.

Shpilkes for a Knave (James Redd and the Blecchs), Monday, 24 April 2017 16:32 (one year ago) Permalink

You seem to be over-thinking this guitar playing thing. Are you a keyboard player by any chance?
Ha yes, how did you guess.

Chris, Tuesday, 25 April 2017 10:52 (one year ago) Permalink

Which one of his books, Blecchs? Analysing Popular Music?

My Body's Made of Crushed Little Evening Stars (Sund4r), Tuesday, 25 April 2017 13:05 (one year ago) Permalink

Think the proper title is Song Means, but yeah, that one.

Shpilkes for a Knave (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 26 April 2017 02:05 (one year ago) Permalink

Those are different books - the one Sund4r mentions is a collection with numerous authors.

timellison, Wednesday, 26 April 2017 03:05 (one year ago) Permalink

Okay, start again. Not that one, but the other one whose subtitle is similar to that one's title.

Shpilkes for a Knave (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 26 April 2017 10:40 (one year ago) Permalink

three weeks pass...

Trying to learn "never going back again". The guy in the video tutorial says it's fairly advanced fingerpicking, well I have a few fingerpicking tunes under my belt and I'm not finding it a problem. Then he says the saving grace is that the left hand is pretty easy. Damn, is my left hand that bad? I can't even make the shapes cleanly,

ledge, Saturday, 20 May 2017 09:25 (one year ago) Permalink

... let alone have any hope of switching between them quickly enough. Posting this not out of any vain hope for magic hints & tips, but if I do manage to crack it, as proof that persistence pays off.

ledge, Saturday, 20 May 2017 09:26 (one year ago) Permalink

When I first started learning about bar chords, I thought for sure I would never be able to play something like 'Wave of Mutilation' but the more I tried it, the easier it got. It doesn't happen in the span of one or two practice sessions, but it'll come to you the more you familiarize yourself with the tune.

A smarter man than myself once said, "If you think you've gone too far, just keep going." And I find that's usually a good rule of thumb.

Austin, Saturday, 20 May 2017 20:58 (one year ago) Permalink

"Never Going Back Again" is fairly challenging, I'd say. Definitely a few notches up from "Blackbird" or "Freight Train". I don't know why he'd say that the left hand part is easy; it's less intuitive than e.g. Zeppelin's acoustic songs. I recommend using a metronome really strictly and slowing it way the fuck down, maybe starting at less than half the original tempo.

Tomorrow Begat Tomorrow (Sund4r), Saturday, 20 May 2017 23:06 (one year ago) Permalink

Sorry if that's the kind of hint you weren't looking for. It's just the only I was able to learn or teach it.

Tomorrow Begat Tomorrow (Sund4r), Saturday, 20 May 2017 23:25 (one year ago) Permalink

yeah I do take it slow, although not with a metronome.

my barres are ok for chugging out chords but show their limitations when it comes to fingerstyle. hardest thing in ngba though is one that stretches over four frets, even with a capo on 4 that's ahem a stretch.

ledge, Sunday, 21 May 2017 13:41 (one year ago) Permalink

damn this flagging app keeps posting too early.

ledge, Sunday, 21 May 2017 13:41 (one year ago) Permalink

... & the one where I have to fret the top two strings with my little finger, which is apparently too puny and weak.

ledge, Sunday, 21 May 2017 13:42 (one year ago) Permalink

Pretty difficult tune tbh.

Punnet of the Grapes (Tom D.), Sunday, 21 May 2017 13:45 (one year ago) Permalink

Pretty difficult tune tbh

Aye but I think if I can't get it now I never will. (Where "now' is a period of weeks, probably months.)

A smarter man than myself once said, "If you think you've gone too far, just keep going." And I find that's usually a good rule of thumb

True, I would add "until you know you've gone too far", you can bite off more than you can chew.

ledge, Sunday, 21 May 2017 17:02 (one year ago) Permalink

So did you stop screwing around and really learn to play the guitar?

the last famous person you were surprised to discover was actually (man alive), Sunday, 21 May 2017 17:04 (one year ago) Permalink

If the answer is yes, be sure to come over to Fingerstyle Guitar: Can You Do It?

The Pickety 33⅓ Policeman (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 21 May 2017 17:20 (one year ago) Permalink

I quit screwing around and very slowly learnt to actually play the guitar to a standard where I'm happy to play by myself in front of the TV, still terrified to play in front of anyone else. Now I have a kid and very little time to actually learn to play the guitar.

ledge, Sunday, 21 May 2017 17:38 (one year ago) Permalink

xp I will, shortly. or longly.

ledge, Sunday, 21 May 2017 17:48 (one year ago) Permalink

maybe it's an unhelpful or self-deprecating distinction but I feel like I learnt to play songs on the guitar rather than actually learning to play the guitar? e.g. I don't do scales.

ledge, Sunday, 21 May 2017 17:54 (one year ago) Permalink

Same here.

Punnet of the Grapes (Tom D.), Sunday, 21 May 2017 17:56 (one year ago) Permalink

The 13th chord shape is tough, yeah, but I don't recall if this is ever actually necessary?:

... & the one where I have to fret the top two strings with my little finger, which is apparently too puny and weak.

Are you thinking of the chorus? Is it not possible to use the 3rd finger for the B string and the 4th finger for the high E string?

Tomorrow Begat Tomorrow (Sund4r), Sunday, 21 May 2017 18:14 (one year ago) Permalink

I never paid a lot of attention to that tune, but there are two guitar tracks right?

the last famous person you were surprised to discover was actually (man alive), Sunday, 21 May 2017 18:21 (one year ago) Permalink

xp that's slower for me to make but yeah definitely cleaner once I have. might be easier for me to work on the speed than idk lifting tiny dumbells with my little finger.

ledge, Sunday, 21 May 2017 18:23 (one year ago) Permalink

might be two on the record idk but you can do a v passable imitation with one.

ledge, Sunday, 21 May 2017 18:31 (one year ago) Permalink

what guide/tab sheet are you using? or none lol

Nhex, Sunday, 21 May 2017 18:39 (one year ago) Permalink

https://youtu.be/_rLZ-LIx09I

ledge, Sunday, 21 May 2017 18:43 (one year ago) Permalink

I think I just hear one? Buckingham played it solo when I saw them. (Fairly close to this, and similarly, disappointingly slowed down). Based on a scan of Youtube live clips, he's been playing it with one guitar (using the same fingerings that I think ledge and I are using) since at least '92. This live version from '77 seems to be accompanied with acoustic bass, though, but I think it's actually a little fuller-sounding than the record.

2xp

Tomorrow Begat Tomorrow (Sund4r), Sunday, 21 May 2017 18:44 (one year ago) Permalink

According to recording assistant Cris Morris, this song took a while to record. Said Morris: "It was Lindsey's pet project, just two guitar tracks but he did it over and over again. In the end his vocal didn't quite match the guitar tracks so we had to slow them down a little."

http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=15497

Bit weird though, why wouldn't the tracks be recorded at the same speed?

ledge, Monday, 22 May 2017 08:03 (one year ago) Permalink

Key was too high for his voice?

Punnet of the Grapes (Tom D.), Monday, 22 May 2017 08:58 (one year ago) Permalink

he seems to manage when he's doing it live!

ledge, Monday, 22 May 2017 09:19 (one year ago) Permalink

Interesting. I had assumed they just stereoized one guitar track on the album.

Tomorrow Begat Tomorrow (Sund4r), Tuesday, 23 May 2017 02:34 (one year ago) Permalink

ahh drop d, no wonder i could never sound it out in standard tuning

just another (diamonddave85), Tuesday, 23 May 2017 03:14 (one year ago) Permalink

Started using a metronome. Good tip! Feels like I'm screwing around just that little bit less.

ledge, Wednesday, 24 May 2017 08:05 (one year ago) Permalink

Glad to hear it!

Tomorrow Begat Tomorrow (Sund4r), Wednesday, 24 May 2017 11:59 (one year ago) Permalink

Are you barreling through the whole tune from beginning to end or looping little sections?

The Pickety 33⅓ Policeman (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 24 May 2017 12:52 (one year ago) Permalink

Bit of both, more of the latter. It's good to get a feel for how it all goes together but I know time is better spent focusing on the trickier parts.

ledge, Wednesday, 24 May 2017 13:07 (one year ago) Permalink

five months pass...

I want to stop screwing around and actually learn to play the bass guitar. is it a really bad idea to start with fretless? y/n

it's the style i eventually want to play so in my mind it makes sense to just go for it. i'm quite good at guitar and my playing tends to be more rhythmic than melodic. so even though they're completely different beasts, i'm not going to be a complete n00b when it comes to mechanical fundamentals.

any fretless players here? tips, tricks?

scoff walker (diamonddave85), Wednesday, 25 October 2017 18:57 (seven months ago) Permalink

I'm not a bass player, but why fretless? Just because I associate it with more melodic, floaty styles and fretted with more rhythmic bass playing.

change display name (Jordan), Wednesday, 25 October 2017 19:59 (seven months ago) Permalink

idk it's really the only style i've connected with? i really like the long slides and its "round" sound

scoff walker (diamonddave85), Wednesday, 25 October 2017 20:25 (seven months ago) Permalink

Seems like you could go a lot faster with a fretted bass, but if you really prefer that sound....

Bazooka Jobim (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 26 October 2017 00:47 (seven months ago) Permalink

i say go for the fretless if that's what you really want to play.

na (NA), Thursday, 26 October 2017 14:20 (seven months ago) Permalink

Just get one of these

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJDXxKP6Qxk

change display name (Jordan), Thursday, 26 October 2017 14:25 (seven months ago) Permalink

is there a less cool musical instrument on earth than the chapman stick

proton, neutron, electron and crouton (bizarro gazzara), Thursday, 26 October 2017 14:31 (seven months ago) Permalink

the slide whistle maybe? i'm not sure tbh

scoff walker (diamonddave85), Thursday, 26 October 2017 15:46 (seven months ago) Permalink

the master of the chapman stick

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xc__38ryzZo

Οὖτις, Thursday, 26 October 2017 15:50 (seven months ago) Permalink

hey at least it sounds cool

Nhex, Thursday, 26 October 2017 19:10 (seven months ago) Permalink


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