British Right-Wing Pundits

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Could hardly bring myself to read past "This woman did what she had to do. If she allowed herself that ultimate Western accessory depression, then she would just lie down in the sand and die."

ailsa, Saturday, 13 August 2011 05:53 (seven years ago) Permalink

That's actually worse than the parody twitter account suggested it might be.

And at least that had the grace to turn out to be a charity stunt.

Aphex Twin … in my vagina? (Karen D. Tregaskin), Saturday, 13 August 2011 08:04 (seven years ago) Permalink

two months pass...

The knives are out for Herman Cain, as of course they would be. He's personable, he's clever, he's funny, he has a proven business track record, he's small government, he has original ideas, he's post-political, he'd make a way better US president than either Perry or Romney (let alone Obama). But most damningly of all, he's black.
Tags: Barack Obama, Clarence Thomas, democrat, Gloria Allred, Herman Cain, sexual harrassment, Sharon Bialek, Thomas Sowell, Uncle Tom, uppity negro, US presidency

James Mitchell, Tuesday, 8 November 2011 17:45 (seven years ago) Permalink

But the real loathing and resentment will come from the other side. Remember, it was the GOP which campaigned to end the slave trade, not the Democrats.

Delingpole: the Voice of 1865

R. Stornoway (Tom D.), Tuesday, 8 November 2011 17:57 (seven years ago) Permalink

"original ideas" such as insane tax reforms.

good luck in your pyramid (Neil S), Tuesday, 8 November 2011 18:37 (seven years ago) Permalink

I'm sure it's quite possible that the allegations are true. Likely, even. As we know, politics attracts men who are addicted to power; power is aphrodisiacal. Cain would hardly be the first type A individual to make a flagrant pass at an attractive woman. Sure these things must be a huge pain to put up with if you're female. But the idea that such wearisomely routine alpha male behaviour ought to render a man unsuitable for high political office is naive in the extreme: Palmerston? Lloyd George? Bill Clinton?

pick-up/men's rights lingo getting mainstreamed is one of the hidden stories of the last few years imo

goole, Tuesday, 8 November 2011 18:45 (seven years ago) Permalink

this man's slow-but-painful death cannot come quickly enuff imho

The doctor smiled, realizing that he had made his point. (stevie), Tuesday, 8 November 2011 18:50 (seven years ago) Permalink

The fact that 21st century Telegraph bloggers are allowed to tag their posts with "uppity negro" for SEO purposes says something about the whole enterprise, although I'm not quite sure what.

The Telegraph: your top news source for all your uppity negro news.

James Mitchell, Tuesday, 8 November 2011 19:35 (seven years ago) Permalink

lol that's the only article with that tag

goole, Tuesday, 8 November 2011 19:44 (seven years ago) Permalink

‘Farage has only got one ball.’ The last time I made reference to the Ukip leader’s monotesticular status, I got a rocket from an outraged reader. But the reader had missed the point entirely. Nigel Farage’s handicap is a strength, not a weakness. He’s open about it, he’s unembarrassed by it and he’s a better man for it. Yes, Farage may have lost a bollock to cancer, but by God he’s got more cojones than almost any Conservative you could name.

Our Nigel is a Conservative himself, of course. Just one who has been temporarily dispossessed by the mainstream party. When you talk to Farage he’s perfectly upfront about what he considers to be Ukip’s role: to act as the Tory party’s conscience. The moment the Conservatives start behaving like proper Conservatives again — Eurosceptical, small government, low tax, etc — that’ll be it. Most of the 7 per cent of voters who are currently Ukip’s will be straight back into the Tory fold and we’ll have a proper, Thatcherite government again doing the Lord’s work.

Seven per cent! That figure — from the latest YouGov poll — is pretty amazing, isn’t it? It puts Ukip only one point away from the ailing Lib Dems, meaning it’s on track to become Britain’s third largest political party. Yet you’d scarcely be aware of this development, the way it has been ignored by most of our mainstream media.

http://www.spectator.co.uk/columnists/all/7378293/dont-expect-the-bbc-to-tell-you-but-ukip-is-on-the-march.thtml

James Mitchell, Thursday, 10 November 2011 10:49 (seven years ago) Permalink

Sensible policies for a better Britain.

good luck in your pyramid (Neil S), Thursday, 10 November 2011 11:40 (seven years ago) Permalink

We really need a James Delingpole slam thread but he is pretty much #1* on my list of terrible people who are likely to Google their own name and start posting.

*Johann Hari RIP.

Matt DC, Thursday, 10 November 2011 12:35 (seven years ago) Permalink

The moment the Conservatives start behaving like proper Conservatives again — Eurosceptical, small government, low tax, etc — that’ll be it. Most of the 7 per cent of voters who are currently Ukip’s will be straight back into the Tory fold and we’ll have a proper, Thatcherite government again doing the Lord’s work.

fuck me, where does one begin with this? proper Conservatives = Thatcherite? The current gov is not ultra-Thatcherite? Thatcherite government was small? Low taxes = poll tax?

glumdalclitch, Thursday, 10 November 2011 12:37 (seven years ago) Permalink

it's like he makes up everything on the spot without giving it any thought whatsoever!

good luck in your pyramid (Neil S), Thursday, 10 November 2011 12:39 (seven years ago) Permalink

Low taxes = poll tax?

When these guys say low taxes they only mean low taxes for themselves and their friends and family, and if you can come with a tax that is massively unfair to people poorer than them then all the better!

R. Stornoway (Tom D.), Thursday, 10 November 2011 12:54 (seven years ago) Permalink

Rod Liddle had been officially cited for contempt of court after a piece in the Spectator describing the current Lawrence trial as a 'vindictive charade'.

Mohombi Khush Hua (ShariVari), Thursday, 17 November 2011 15:18 (seven years ago) Permalink

Judge has referred it to the AG.

Mohombi Khush Hua (ShariVari), Thursday, 17 November 2011 15:21 (seven years ago) Permalink

yes, the "vindictive charade" of wishing to prosecute those who stand accused of a racist murder. PC gorn mad etc. etc.

good luck in your pyramid (Neil S), Thursday, 17 November 2011 15:29 (seven years ago) Permalink

http://i.imgur.com/2QaIO.jpg

The Triumph of the Will High (nakhchivan), Thursday, 17 November 2011 20:24 (seven years ago) Permalink

two months pass...

Rod Liddle is being "fearless" again I see.

Ned Trifle X, Thursday, 26 January 2012 14:28 (seven years ago) Permalink

he writes what others are AFRAID to write (for fear of sounding like an idiot)

good luck in your pyramid (Neil S), Thursday, 26 January 2012 14:32 (seven years ago) Permalink

Writes what others afraid to read morelikeamirite?

Charles Kennedy Jumped Up, He Called 'Oh No'. (Tom D.), Thursday, 26 January 2012 14:34 (seven years ago) Permalink

he makes Littlejohn read like Swift.

good luck in your pyramid (Neil S), Thursday, 26 January 2012 14:41 (seven years ago) Permalink

"Liddle is a member of the Labour Party"

Charles Kennedy Jumped Up, He Called 'Oh No'. (Tom D.), Thursday, 26 January 2012 14:46 (seven years ago) Permalink

I don't think that prevents him from being right wing.

Ned Trifle X, Thursday, 26 January 2012 15:07 (seven years ago) Permalink

it's compulsory iirc

summer sun, something's begun, but uh-oh those tumblr whites (Noodle Vague), Thursday, 26 January 2012 15:09 (seven years ago) Permalink

"rod liddle is visibly drinking himself to death"

dave cool it (stevie), Thursday, 26 January 2012 19:35 (seven years ago) Permalink

one month passes...

Must fancy a job at Forbes:

Does this mean, then, that Americans are conservative fuddy-duddies while we Brits are bold stylistic adventurers forever at the bleeding edge of trendiness? Up to a point. But the truth is, to paraphrase Stephen Fry, whatever sweeping generalisation you care to make about America, you’ll find the opposite is also true. For example, there’s no doubt that America was glacially slow to pick up on music’s most important development in the past 25 years: dance. In Britain – thanks to acid house and Balearic beats, which soon mutated into warehouse rave and so on – dance music was well under way by 1987. In America, it wasn’t till the mid-Nineties that repetitive beats had begun to penetrate the mainstream.

Part of America’s problem, perhaps, was grunge. The US felt so incredibly chuffed, apparently, to have invented Nirvana (and Pearl Jam and the rest) that it seemed determined to rest on its laurels and go on churning out bouncy, grinding guitar rock for all eternity. The fickle British music scene has never permitted such complacency, not least because of the intense competition between our cities. From Bristol came the dub-heavy trip-hop scene and drum and bass; from Manchester came the dance-rock crossover called Baggy, as well as Oasis; from London, we’ve had everything from the chirpy mockney of Britpop to dubstep. We invent more genres in a decade that the US has managed in its entire musical history.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/music/rockandpopmusic/9140793/Sade-and-two-nations-divided-by-their-taste-in-music.html

James Mitchell, Wednesday, 14 March 2012 05:30 (seven years ago) Permalink

Nothing more cutting edge than Britpop.

Kiarostami bag (milo z), Wednesday, 14 March 2012 06:46 (seven years ago) Permalink

it was lol when Delingpole was namechecking RJD2 in his column a while back

Sylv_ebanks (DJ Mencap), Wednesday, 14 March 2012 08:28 (seven years ago) Permalink

We invent more genres in a decade that the US has managed in its entire musical history.

Of course, because the only genres the US has invented are Dixieland and grunge.

rain came down like water falling from the clouds (snoball), Wednesday, 14 March 2012 09:15 (seven years ago) Permalink

On similar note in today's Telegraph (the printed version, not the website they let Delingpole drool all over):

Eager to endear himself to young voters, Gordon Brown professed himself to be an unlikely fan of the Arctic Monkeys. David Cameron is, however, unlikely to provoke any cruel titters with his more believable choice: Whiskey in the Jar by Thin Lizzy.

“It has one of the best guitar riffs in the history of rock music,” the Prime Minister says, demonstrating some knowledge of the music in question. “I have it on i-tunes or play it when needing a lift.”

Proving that he is a genuinely groovy guy, Cameron is backing Rock the House, a parliamentary music competition founded by my old friend Mike Weatherley.

James Mitchell, Wednesday, 14 March 2012 09:24 (seven years ago) Permalink

Jeez, I thought that Gordon Brown being an Arctic Monkeys fan was debunked a long time ago. Still it's best not to let the facts get in the way.

fun loving and xtremely tolrant (Billy Dods), Wednesday, 14 March 2012 09:53 (seven years ago) Permalink

“We live in an increasingly godless society, where Christians are marginalised, sacked and even prosecuted for upholding their beliefs, yet we are urged to ‘Pray 4 Muamba’” sighed Richard Littlejohn of The Daily Mail. “With a dwindling number of people attending church, millions have taken to worshipping footballers and celebrities instead. In the words of G. K. Chesterton: ‘When people stop believing in God, they don’t believe in nothing – they believe in anything.’”

otm, man. otm.

less of the same (darraghmac), Tuesday, 20 March 2012 16:02 (seven years ago) Permalink

pray 4 muamba not pray 2 muamba, surely?

brokering (pimping) (stevie), Tuesday, 20 March 2012 16:16 (seven years ago) Permalink

God I'm sick of that Chesterton quote.

Fizzles, Tuesday, 20 March 2012 16:18 (seven years ago) Permalink

i believe he added 2+2 together, not an uncommon littlejohn trait- tho i understand that it's quite unusual for him not to get 5

less of the same (darraghmac), Tuesday, 20 March 2012 16:19 (seven years ago) Permalink

The Daily Mail, well known for its lofty disdain for footballers and celebrities.

good luck in your pyramid (Neil S), Tuesday, 20 March 2012 16:21 (seven years ago) Permalink

hang on is Littlejohn claiming to be a christian? cos i have questions

red is hungry green is jawless (Noodle Vague), Tuesday, 20 March 2012 16:22 (seven years ago) Permalink

shoot

less of the same (darraghmac), Tuesday, 20 March 2012 16:22 (seven years ago) Permalink

piers morgan claims to be a christian too so i guess anything is possible

caek, Tuesday, 20 March 2012 16:31 (seven years ago) Permalink

if christ were alive today he would smite young black millionaires too, i guess, i dunno

less of the same (darraghmac), Tuesday, 20 March 2012 16:32 (seven years ago) Permalink

He'd put a stop to all this 'compassionate lefty' business, fako!

Mark G, Tuesday, 20 March 2012 16:35 (seven years ago) Permalink

God I'm sick of that Chesterton quote.

Have it in my head it's a fake or messed-up one? Could be wrong, cba checking – it does have that authentic Chesterton "a-ha" quality that gets up my nose, esp when he does it four times in a paragraph.

woof, Tuesday, 20 March 2012 16:36 (seven years ago) Permalink

believing in 'anything' isn't qualitatively different from believing in god, at least some of the 'anything' might be true

less of the same (darraghmac), Tuesday, 20 March 2012 16:40 (seven years ago) Permalink

well said, Fizzles -- the Chesterton line, real or not, is an irritating smug thing that people say but that is not apparently true.

I have never believed in a god, and I don't believe in 'anything' either, supposing that 'anything' here might mean, say (as I think it does when people spout that line): mysticism, tarot, astrology, alternative medicine and other 'superstitions', or even supposing it means (eg) worshipping the royal family or celebrities.

and the same probably goes for most atheists.

the pinefox, Tuesday, 20 March 2012 16:43 (seven years ago) Permalink

ts: "I believe in nothing" vs "I don't believe in nothing"

Mark G, Tuesday, 20 March 2012 16:43 (seven years ago) Permalink

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hSpCXUhp2uA

the pinefox, Tuesday, 20 March 2012 16:46 (seven years ago) Permalink

Wikiquote agrees with you: http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/G._K._Chesterton#Misattributed

That Littlejohn quote is nuts - as Stevie says, it's praying FOR Muamba, not TO him. I mean, I have problems with the fact that people are suggesting prayers instead of, you know, trained medical assistance, but FFS Littlejohn, you are an ass.

xposts - and yes, the falsely attributed quote is stupid anyway, it's not even attempting to make its conclusion follow logically on from its premises, it's just a piece of dogma.

emil.y, Tuesday, 20 March 2012 16:47 (seven years ago) Permalink

xps (ty emil.y)

turns out i could be arsed. Not Chesterton, but a critic's paraphrase of this from one of his Father Brown stories:

‘It’s the first effect of not believing in God that you lose your common sense and can’t see things as they are. Anything that anybody talks about, and says there’s a good deal in it, extends itself indefinitely like a vista in a nightmare. And a dog is an omen, and a cat is a mystery, and a pig is a mascot, and a beetle is a scarab, calling up all the menagerie of polytheism from Egypt and old India; Dog Anubis and great green-eyed Pasht and all the holy howling Bulls of Bashan; reeling back to the bestial gods of the beginning, escaping into elephants and snakes and crocodiles; and all because you are frightened of four words: ‘He was made Man’.’

Less snappy that.

woof, Tuesday, 20 March 2012 16:47 (seven years ago) Permalink


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